Glock 43

OK, so a little Googling managed to answer some of my questions.

This is from a couple of different articles:

Most laser sights use a red laser diode. Others use an infrared diode to produce a dot invisible to the naked human eye but detectable with night vision devices. In the late 1990s, green diode pumped solid state laser (DPSS) laser sights (532 nm) became available.

In 2007, LaserMax, a company specializing in manufacturing lasers for military and police firearms, introduced the first mass-production green laser available for small arms. The green laser is supposed to be more visible than the red laser in bright lighting conditions because, for the same wattage, green light appears brighter than red light.

Early laser pointers were helium–neon (HeNe) gas lasers and generated laser radiation at 633 nanometer (nm), usually designed to produce a laser beam with an output power under 1 milliwatt (mW). The least expensive laser pointers use a deep red laser diode near the 650 nanometers (nm) wavelength. Slightly more expensive ones use a red-orange 635 nm diode, more easily visible because of the greater sensitivity of the human eye at 635 nm. Other colors are possible too, with the 532 nm green laser being the most common alternative. Yellow-orange laser pointers, at 593.5 nm, later became available. In September 2005 handheld blue laser pointers at 473 nm became available. In early 2010 "Blu-ray" (actually violet) laser pointers at 405 nm went on sale.

The apparent brightness of a spot from a laser beam depends on the optical power of the laser, the reflectivity of the surface, and the chromatic response of the human eye. For the same optical power, green laser light will seem brighter than other colors because the human eye is most sensitive at low light levels in the green region of the spectrum (wavelength 520–570 nm). Sensitivity decreases for redder or bluer wavelengths.

The output power of a laser pointer is usually stated in milliwatts (mW). In the U.S. lasers are classified by the American National Standards Institute and Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Visible laser pointers (400–700 nm) operating at less than 1 mW power are Class 2 or II, and visible laser pointers operating with 1–5 mW power are Class 3A or IIIa. Class 3B or IIIb lasers generate between 5 and 500 mW; Class 4 or IV lasers generate more than 500 mW. The US FDA Code of Federal Regulations stipulates that "demonstration laser products" such as pointers must comply with applicable requirements for Class I, IIa, II, or IIIa devices.

Red and red-orange

These are the simplest pointers, as laser diodes are available in these wavelengths. The pointer is nothing more than a battery-powered laser diode. The first red laser pointers released in the early 1980s were large, unwieldy devices that sold for hundreds of dollars. Today, they are much smaller and generally cost very little. In the 21st century, diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) red laser pointers emitting at 671 nm became available. Although this wavelength can be obtained directly with an inexpensive laser diode, higher beam quality and narrower spectral bandwidth are achieved through DPSS versions.

Green

Green laser pointers appeared on the market circa 2000, and are the most common type of DPSS lasers (also called DPSSFD for "diode pumped solid state frequency-doubled"). They are more complicated than standard red laser pointers, because laser diodes are not commonly available in this wavelength range. The green light is generated in an indirect process, beginning with a high-power (typically 100–300 mW) infrared AlGaAs laser diode operating at 808 nm. The 808 nm light pumps a crystal of neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (Nd:YVO4) (or Nd:YAG or less common Nd:YLF), which lases deeper in the infrared at 1064 nm. This lasing action is due to an electronic transition in the fluorescent neodymium ion, Nd(III), which is present in all of these crystals.

The Nd:YVO4 or other Nd-doped crystal is coated on the diode side with a dielectric mirror that reflects at 808 nm and transmits at 1064 nm. The crystal is mounted on a copper block, acting as a heat sink; its 1064 nm output is fed into a crystal of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), mounted on a heat sink in the laser cavity resonator. The orientation of the crystals must be matched, as they are both anisotropic and the Nd:YVO4 outputs polarized light. This unit acts as a frequency doubler, and halves the wavelength to the desired 532 nm. The resonant cavity is terminated by a dielectric mirror that reflects at 1064 nm and transmits at 532 nm. An infrared filter behind the mirror removes IR radiation from the output beam (this may be omitted or inadequate in less-expensive "pointer-style" green lasers), and the assembly ends in a collimator lens.

Nd:YVO4 is replacing other Nd-doped materials such as Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF in such systems because of lower dependency on the exact parameters of the pump diode (therefore allowing for higher tolerances), wider absorption band, lower lasing threshold, higher slope efficiency, linear polarization of output light, and single mode output. For frequency doubling of higher power lasers, LBO is used instead of KTP. Newer lasers use a composite Nd:YVO4/KTP crystal instead of two discrete ones.

Some green lasers operate in pulse or quasi-continuous wave (QCW) mode, to reduce cooling problems and prolong battery life.

An announcement in 2009 of a direct green laser (which does not require doubling) promises much higher efficiencies and could foster the development of new color video projectors.

In 2012, Nichia and OSRAM developed and manufactured merchant high-power green laser diodes (515/520 nm) which can emit green laser directly.

Regards.

Mark

Formerly known as ML

Dorsai posted:

Green lasers will always cost more.  The laser is actually red.  To make it green, it goes through a filter that changes the wavelength.  The beam loses power in the process, so to keep the same output, it has to be a higher power when it is emitted.  A higher powered laser plus the filter to change the frequency makes it costlier to build and therefore more $$ from your pocket.  Also, not as long a life on the battery.

Yeah, pretty sure that's not how lasers work. 

Beren412 posted:
Dorsai posted:

Green lasers will always cost more.  The laser is actually red.  To make it green, it goes through a filter that changes the wavelength.  The beam loses power in the process, so to keep the same output, it has to be a higher power when it is emitted.  A higher powered laser plus the filter to change the frequency makes it costlier to build and therefore more $$ from your pocket.  Also, not as long a life on the battery.

Yeah, pretty sure that's not how lasers work. 

Yep,  start off with the red 808nm diode and add an Output Coupler mirror reflecting 532nm.  Here is a DIY http://laserpointerforums.com/...-crystals-42495.html

 

IN NEED OF A GUN WHEN I CAN'T reach for 911 

I've had my G43 since last fall and have 565 rounds through it.  Almost all of those the TLR-6 was mounted.  I really like that light, and I generally prefer SF over Streamlight.  It's certainly not a 500 lumen light, but this gun isn't for going hunting for armed people - it' a BUG and a house gun.  The entire package still fits in my pocket as well or better than my J-frame.  I also have the HD sights and the Taran Tactical +2 and +1 extensions - no issues with those either.  Agree with the others here about trigger finger placement.  It takes some adjustment for most folks because of the size and thin profile of the weapon. 

Now I just need Alessi to make an ankle holster for the G43 with the TLR-6. 

Beren412 posted:
Dorsai posted:

Green lasers will always cost more.  The laser is actually red.  To make it green, it goes through a filter that changes the wavelength.  The beam loses power in the process, so to keep the same output, it has to be a higher power when it is emitted.  A higher powered laser plus the filter to change the frequency makes it costlier to build and therefore more $$ from your pocket.  Also, not as long a life on the battery.

Yeah, pretty sure that's not how lasers work. 

Getting the green light is the hard part, according to Crimson Trace Senior Product Design Engineer Jon Rievley. "A green laser basically starts out like a red laser, except it starts with an infrared, invisible laser at with a wavelength of 808 nanometers (nm). That light is then shined into a secondary crystal laser yielding a wavelength of 1,066 nm. Finally, that laser is shined through a frequency doubler, which changes it back down to roughly 532 nm," he said. "That wavelength is easier to see, but harder to achieve. Instead of a single process to get a single laser, it takes three steps, more space and 10-times more energy to produce."

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Mark

Swear allegiance to the flag Whatever flag they offer

Never hint at what you really feel

Teach the children quietly For some day sons and daughters

Will rise up and fight while we stood still

 

Joined:  2/24/2003                          Location:  Nevada, USA

Mark, thanks for the great answer to the green laser questions. If I might add a short answer to the same, and also in Mark's, green (approx 530 nm) looks brighter because the human eye absorbs it better/best. 

When we were working on light based less than lethal many moons ago, we aimed at that green (flashing at about 14hz) to try to swamp the optical system without causing permanent blindness. Figured out that works, but bright white does just as good or better because the eyes will naturally shut and turn away, achieving the same goal.

Just got my 43, Have mounted trijicon HDs to match its bigger brothers and a TLR6. 

Does anybody make a pocket holster specific for this combo? I bought an UM pocket holster that will work but was just wondering. 

Also bought a kydex OWB for the combo but ain't sure Im gonna keep it. 

“Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send me!’”
"Fuck the know it alls.They don't have to do it, and don't have the balls to do it"

Pat Rogers.

BKS posted:

Just got my 43, Have mounted trijicon HDs to match its bigger brothers and a TLR6. 

Does anybody make a pocket holster specific for this combo? I bought an UM pocket holster that will work but was just wondering. 

Also bought a kydex OWB for the combo but ain't sure Im gonna keep it. 

I have the Lasermax nylon holster and it works for pocket carry with the TLR-6.  I also had Detroit Holster make me kydex pocket holsters (right and left) with the TLR-6.  Very happy with both options.  I typically use the Lasermax around the house in shorts and the kydex in street clothes.

ETA: 

http://www.detroitholster.com/store/product/john-r/

https://www.lasermax.com/produ...ories/pocket-holster

Well I guess I got a broken one. I cant get the laser anywhere close to the center of the light or the sights. 

 

“Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send me!’”
"Fuck the know it alls.They don't have to do it, and don't have the balls to do it"

Pat Rogers.

The more I shoot my 43.... The worse the trigger feels....heavy and takes much concentration to NOT pull way low left

 

"Without training they lack knowlege, without knowlege they lack discipline , without discipline they lack victory"

 

“Go as hard as you can, for as long as you can, and then quit.”

arcticlightfighter posted:

The more I shoot my 43.... The worse the trigger feels....heavy and takes much concentration to NOT pull way low left

 

Ghost Edge connector and don't look back .  .  .

“There are two ways to do most anything- right . . . and again.”  Pat Rogers

Mark7 posted:
arcticlightfighter posted:

The more I shoot my 43.... The worse the trigger feels....heavy and takes much concentration to NOT pull way low left

 

Ghost Edge connector and don't look back .  .  .

I may have to try it. Im getting better with the trigger but holy crap its heavy. Dont know about the Ghost for a BUG for work but Im going to try it.

 

side note, Vickers +2's seem to work pretty well.

"Without training they lack knowlege, without knowlege they lack discipline , without discipline they lack victory"

 

“Go as hard as you can, for as long as you can, and then quit.”

I just shot my friend's Glock 43 last week for the first time. She really likes it  and has been carrying it for several months off duty. I really liked it a lot. Shot very reliably and felt much better than my Glock 26 or 27. Because I'm a gear whore, I'm gonna have to save up for one now.

I do agree on the trigger though, definitely a lot heavier than the standard stock Glock trigger. Does anyone know why Glock made it this way?

SEMPER FIDELIS

Logic suggests that they anticipated a significant portion of the owners would not follow instructions and just shove it in their pocket or purse and they wanted to make it harder to blow your nuts off.  Smart move.  I haven't tried any of the aftermarket springs/connectors, but I believe they are out there and can reduce the heavy trigger.

I own a Shield.  As I tell others, the outside dimensions of the Shield (with the flush fit mag) and the G43 are almost identical.  The primary difference is the more oval shape and deeper grip of the Shield.  Some (me included) think it feels better than the G43.  Others don't.  Really, that's what it comes down to since they fit in the same envelope.  Which one feels better.  

-------------------------

Mark

Swear allegiance to the flag Whatever flag they offer

Never hint at what you really feel

Teach the children quietly For some day sons and daughters

Will rise up and fight while we stood still

 

Joined:  2/24/2003                          Location:  Nevada, USA

I've owned a Shield or two since they were first introduced. I bought a Glock 43 last fall. The Glock 43 is slightly smaller than the Shield with the 7 round magazine. On paper the differences may be similar, but in reality, the Glock 43 is just smaller enough that I find it extremely difficult to hand on to when shooting. Much more so than one of my Shields.  

Fortunately my wife has smaller hands. She fired a Shield and the Glock 43 side by side. She then thanked me for her new Glock (which prior to her stepping on the firing line was my new Glock). 

I think that they are both excellent guns for what they were intended for. I prefer the Shield, my bride prefers the Glock 43. Like Dorsal stated, I think it really comes down to which gun feels better in the individuals hand. 

 

 

 

Joined: 4-23-04                                          Location: SW Ohio

So I'm picking up my 43 on monday.  Any updates on preferred sights and holsters?  I typically carry my G19 AIWB so staying consistent with that would be ideal.  Also looking for opinions on what size TTI baseplate to get.  Was thinking the +1 or +2  in the gun and the +3 on the reload.  Any other reliability issues?  From what I gather some of the initial kinks have been worked out with the initial release 

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Don't look at me in that tone of voice

 

Rev. Trop
Ordained Dudeist Priest at Dudeism, the Church of the Latter-Day Dude

 

I put the Trijicon HDs on mine. Only problem is now I need them on all my pistols, and that's gonna cost me.

I am currently using a Dale Fricke "Zacchaeus" holster. It is very similar to a vanguard from RCS.  I don't find it ideal, it moves to much for me, just doesn't feel secure.  I am waiting for the Crimson Trace Laserguard Pro to come out before I get a better holster.

______________________________________________________

 

"Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor, and the contrary opinion is wishful thinking at its worst. Breeds that forget this basic truth have always paid for it with their lives and freedoms." - R. Heinlen

 

Joined:  1/30/05           Location: Graham, Wa

I got one, liked it, so got another 43.  After 250 failure free rounds through each, I tried aftermarket slide stops and mag releases.  50 rounds in, I started to get failures to lock back on an empty magazine, consistently.  Did  repeated testing, different ammo, two shooters, consistent failure.  Tolerance stacking maybe, returned to OEM parts and no more failures to lock back. 

Now, both are bone stock.  As a BUG or walking the dog, stock sights are adequate,  though I'm considering  a wide "U" rear sight and plain blade front on the KISS principal.  I'll probably stay with OEM magazines, but that's just me.

Enjoy yours

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“Speak softly and carry a big stick;  you will go far. “

 Theodore Roosevelt

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Joined: 29 May 2008          Location: AZ

350 rds through my 43. No failures. I have a vickers slide release, ghost edge connector, and ameriglo sights (plain black, tritium front with orange HD). I have two plus 3 baseplates with provided springs, two plus 2 baseplates with provided springs, one plus 1 baseplate with OEM spring. Not a single issue with any of them.

I just bought one of the vickers plus 2 baseplates to try out because I sold the TTI plus 1. Only reason for selling was it still was just not enough for me to get a comfortable purchase on the gun. Strictly personal preference, I think they knocked it out of the park with that baseplate. It gets you one more round and the size difference compared to the stock flush plate is almost negligible

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Don't look at me in that tone of voice

 

Rev. Trop
Ordained Dudeist Priest at Dudeism, the Church of the Latter-Day Dude

 

What are the best options insofar as fibre optic sights are concerned? I've got 10-8's on my Glock 19 and 1911. The 10-8 version for the 43 look a little too low profile for me. Are there other, more "high profile" options?

"If you change your mind and decide you want your kids to grow up to be men, not pussies, let me know." SSG Partlow

So I have had my 43 for a while. Last week I ordered a TLR6 and a kydex holster for it. The TLR6 arrived at the beginning of the week and the holster yesterday. I went to the range this morning and every time I pull the gun out of the holster the battery door of the TLR6 opens and the batteries fall out. Anyone else experience this? I loosened the holster and it still does this?

LPD "People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. . . The leader works in the open, and the boss in covert. The leader leads, and the boss drives." - Theodore Roosevelt

lpd5408 posted:

So I have had my 43 for a while. Last week I ordered a TLR6 and a kydex holster for it. The TLR6 arrived at the beginning of the week and the holster yesterday. I went to the range this morning and every time I pull the gun out of the holster the battery door of the TLR6 opens and the batteries fall out. Anyone else experience this? I loosened the holster and it still does this?

Who makes the holster? Is the light mounted correctly? Where is the kydex making contact? Can you heat and reshape the kydex or take a dremel to it?

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Don't look at me in that tone of voice

 

Rev. Trop
Ordained Dudeist Priest at Dudeism, the Church of the Latter-Day Dude

 

I played around with the holster last night after work. A little heat and bending it solved the problem with the holster ( a cheap POS from ebay), but the battery latch still it loose. Ill play with it tonight and then call Stream light on Monday if it doesn't get better.

LPD "People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. . . The leader works in the open, and the boss in covert. The leader leads, and the boss drives." - Theodore Roosevelt

stoner01 posted:

Does anyone have a line on dual mag holders for IWB? I cant seem to find many slim ones.

I used to use one from Milt Sparks when I carried a 3913 off duty; it worked well.

Joined: 10/06/06          Location: SW OH

RE the Streamlight TLR6 battery door. I have sent around 5 of their products back for repair including one of my TLR6 units that had a cracked housing

 

They have always sent me a brand new replacement despite the condition or gow it was damaged. Including one of my SWAT officers TLR lights that took a direct hit to the lens with a sim round. 

"Without training they lack knowlege, without knowlege they lack discipline , without discipline they lack victory"

 

“Go as hard as you can, for as long as you can, and then quit.”

BFG  is out of stock just now, ordered on anyway .  Milt Sparks makes an IWB double pouch, "IPD". They have a delay too, but back a few years ago,  I've used one for 1911 mags , really holds up well.  YMMV

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“Speak softly and carry a big stick;  you will go far. “

 Theodore Roosevelt

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Joined: 29 May 2008          Location: AZ

I've been taking a hard look at the Glock 43 as an alternate carry pistol for warmer weather and with lighter clothing, as well as a BUG is certain situations. It could potentially become my wife's primary also - she has trouble with double stacked grips like the G19.  I'm also looking at the Shield and have watched about a dozen video reviews comparing the two. I've shot both at a local range that has rentals, but I don't think I have enough time behind either to make a decision yet. I want to get my wife to the range to try them, but I think I'm personally leaning towards the G43 because already have a 17 and 19 and feel comfortable with the design.

One thing I'm doing is picking up two G43 magazines to install a Pearce +1 baseplate (for carrying) and a Vickers +2 (spare). I want to try them both in a rental gun to help with my decision. Does anyone have any feedback on those two extensions?  I haven't really seen anyone mention the Pearce +1, but I like the design of the finger rest and the contour that appears to minimize how much length it adds to the grip for concealment.

Does anyone have any feedback on the Glock factory night sights? I believe they're Meprolights? The blue label price with factory night sights is definitely appealing (only adds $50 to the price).

The comment above about magazines not dropping free is concerning, but they seemed to work in the one I rented and others I've handled in stores.

The other mods I'd probably make would be adding the Vickers extended slide and mag releases, which I have on my other Glocks. Sounds like those need to be thoroughly tested in the G43 though.

Dave

I appreciate the desire to ensure your 43 is ready for serious use, but don't overthink what the gun is, or what it can do. For a deep concealment or back-up, I don't think drop free mags are needed, or even desired. I'm not worried about night sights on a pocket pistol that most likely will be used at very personal distances. I'm just saying that the gun as is will do just fine in the intended role. It's not for gunfighting, it's for saving your ass, ideally in 7 rounds or less. Shoot it a bunch before tricking it out.

A coworker has installed an Agency arms trigger ($150) and interesting Trijicon high-vis sights on his. The sights are pretty sweet for close distances. The trigger is ok - the flat face is different and  helps my larger finger fit better in the guard - but the pull was nothing spectacular. 

"It's when you fuck up that you will hear from your peers, not when you are doing your job. We expect people to do their jobs, and don't praise them like six year olds who successfully tied their shoes when they do. " - Fatty

 

If in doubt about the tone of my post, please refer to avatar.

3ACR_Scout posted:

 

One thing I'm doing is picking up two G43 magazines to install a Pearce +1 baseplate (for carrying) and a Vickers +2 (spare). I want to try them both in a rental gun to help with my decision. Does anyone have any feedback on those two extensions?  I haven't really seen anyone mention the Pearce +1, but I like the design of the finger rest and the contour that appears to minimize how much length it adds to the grip for concealment.

I have this one:  http://www.strikeindustries.co...43.html#.WFYhKX1v5Qw

It costs a couple bucks more than the Vickers, but I liked the way it felt for some reason.  I have a couple hundred rounds through mags with those extensions practicing for a GSSF match until I found out I couldn't use them.   Should have maybe read the rules, huh?  Anyways,  they functioned fine. 

Unlike the Vickers they have a finger rest, something I normally don't like much, but for some reason I really like these.

Just a thought.   

Beren412 posted:

This is relavent to my interests since I just bought a Tangodown +2 extension, but for the life of me, I cannot figure out how to remove the OEM plates. 

The base of a Glock mag has 2 things that prevent it from coming off there are tabs on the sides of the mag body, and the bottom locking plate.  Take a punch and depress the locking plate on the bottom and some take some elbow grease to remove.  Visuals here:

http://www.glockmeisterDOTcom/...azineDisassembly.asp

I know some have used a C-clamp to slightly squeeze  the sides of the the mag above the mag plate to  provide pressure helping to depress the tabs while you push the floor plate off.  

You still need to push the locking plate below the floor plate.

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