Never forget who came before you

Far too long without a post in here. Not a family member but a coworker and friend.

Capt Joe G. was a B-47 and KC-135 pilot for nine years before being sent to Vietnam on his second tour. Going from high-altitude strategic aircraft to the other end of the spectrum, Joe flew O-1s as a forward air controller for a year. He was stationed in the delta region of South Vietnam at Canh Tho supporting a small SF base (5th Group). He put together his memoirs a few years back, written from his diary and with thoughts from today added.



This was taken by an observer from the back seat of his O-1. Normally he flew alone but would take up members from the SF unit he supported as well as the occasional ARVN officer. The only armor on the aircraft was a sixteen-inch square of thick steel he sat on. Other than 2.75 WP rockets for target marking his only armament was the .38 revolver and CAR-15 he carried in the cockpit.



I like this picture particularly. Lots of interesting things in it when you study it. The odd muzzle cover is the plastic tube that the spark plugs for the O-1 came in... seems to work pretty well. I'm not sure if he's about to have a magazine malfunction with a 20-rounder or if there was some type of early straight 30-round magazine. He can't remember what the deal was with that.

Joe is an interesting guy to talk to, and has many, many interesting photos of his time over there - airstrikes in progress as well as Ranch Hand defoliation flights, all taken from the vantage point of a FAC. He really only talks about his experiences to other vets, just the kind of guy he is.

Just my $0.02 worth.

 

Steve

 

 

"Damn near everyone is going to be deployed sometime. I'd rather go with a motivated unit that trains hard and takes shit seriously than with some REMF unit with people that do nothing but whine about their GI Bill being fucked up..." - LightScout

 

Joined:  14 Nov 03     Location:  The Concho Valley

I dont have a picture of my Paternal Grandfather, but I do have one of an ME410 trying to blow the B-17, Princess Azul, from the air. He flew over 35 missions, never shot down, and went on to the Aphrodite missions towards the end of the war.



He died in early 2001 after a career flying 707s and 747s for Pan-Am, a short stint at the FAA, and finally as a KC-135 Sim Instructor at American Airlines until literally the day of his death.

Scout Pilot turned Hooker.

THAT is a hell of a photo!

Just my $0.02 worth.

 

Steve

 

 

"Damn near everyone is going to be deployed sometime. I'd rather go with a motivated unit that trains hard and takes shit seriously than with some REMF unit with people that do nothing but whine about their GI Bill being fucked up..." - LightScout

 

Joined:  14 Nov 03     Location:  The Concho Valley

This is my Uncle and my personal hero, he served with the 82nd in WWII Jumping into Holland to secure drop zones for the rest of the division, he was awarded a purple heart and Bronze star, played semi-pro football in Canada after the war and then reenlisted for Korea and made another jump there. During Korea he was awarded a silver star, purple heart, and DSC. He recently passed and will be missed. His DSC citation is being reviewed for upgrade.
Thou art my battle axe and weapons of war: for with thee will I break in pieces the nations, and with thee will I destroy kingdoms; Jeremiah 51:20
quote:
Originally posted by ex-narc:
This is my Uncle and my personal hero, he served with the 82nd in WWII Jumping into Holland to secure drop zones for the rest of the division, he was awarded a purple heart and Bronze star, played semi-pro football in Canada after the war and then reenlisted for Korea and made another jump there with the 187th ARCT. During Korea he was awarded a silver star, purple heart, and DSC. He recently passed and will be missed. His DSC citation is being reviewed for upgrade.
Thou art my battle axe and weapons of war: for with thee will I break in pieces the nations, and with thee will I destroy kingdoms; Jeremiah 51:20
quote:
Originally posted by Nasiriyah110:
THAT is a hell of a photo!


Thanks. They had a war photographer on board for a few missions. I have the original around here somewhere. I meant to say that the picture is of HIS B-17 being attacked.

Scout Pilot turned Hooker.

What a great thread, here is my small contributation.

My Dad was a flying SGT, until they tried to make him become an officer. He said fuck no and went to Pratt and Whitney school, came out as a crew chief on P-47's. He went in on at Sicily and they fought up through the Po Valley. He said it was a hell of a way for a fighter squadron to act. He loved watching and flying in airplanes until he died.

My Uncle Lloyd was a B-17 pilot. He mentioned that he had been shot at and strafed a few times my Uncle Charlie told us about him haveing 5 planes shot up pretty bad. He lost a lot of men, one B-17 he was flying fell apart on landing (it was featured in the 12 O'clock High TV show).

LLoyd loved planes but when his time in Europe was over he flew a B-17 back to the states and in his words "turned in the key, walked out the gate, got on a train went home and never flew again".

My Uncle, Charlie was a P-40 pilot in Burma and had a lot of stories to tell. He was a funny guy that loved to fly and kept flying after the war. He took me up in a few borrowed planes and we had a lot of fun.

I loved sitting there as quiet as a mouse and listen to them hanger flying hoping they wouldn't notice me. I learned a lot sitting there.

My other Uncle was in UDT in the South Pacific. He was in UDT 15 and was among those that did the recon on Iwo Jima a couple of days before the attack. He was wounded on the APD, USS Blessman when the Japs bombed it during the attack.

He's been gone for 16 years, my Mom is finally going to send me some of his things to keep along with my Dads stuff from his time in Africa and Italy.
"Hire the handicapped, they're fun to watch"
Great thread.

I don't have photos of them at this time, but both my grandfathers were in the Army, one young enough that he missed WWII. He was a German linguist, counter-intelligence.

My older grandfather was a mortar infantryman who was deployed to western front, I don't know details about his experience, or whether or not he saw combat. I'm glad he came back though.


They have both passed, and I'll likely never know more than I already do about them.

One of my fathers cousins, my second cousin, was a pilot in Vietnam who was shot down and a POW for 7 years. Afterward, he returned to active duty and retired as a full bird colonel, if I recall. He wrote a book about it, which I have a copy of somewhere.

Couple aunts and an uncle in Air Force for a time as well, not during wars though.

To think I thought I was doing something uncharacteristic when I joined. Turned out I got tricked into carrying on the family tradition.
Truly amazing post...thanks to all of these honorable soldiers. May God Bless Each and their families.

This was my Dad's Father sitting, with the sly wink. He was in the Pacific Theater during WWII. The second is my Mom's Father who fought in France.





Grandpa & Grandma in 1948.
He passed in '07. Grandma in '04. He served from 1943-63 & gaurded the likes of Tojo & Tokyo Rose after Japan's surrender.
Here with a Colt A2 Sporter in 2002.

My father. 20 years USAF 1972-92.This is at Kunsan AB ROK,in 1984 next to his F-16A.

“...The helicopter symbolizes the victory of ingenuity over common sense.”

sadly, i have none of my family and its massive military background. grandfather was in the navy during ww2, other grandfather was in korea with the USAF and vietnam with the US Army (3 tours), uncle was USAF during ODS, great uncle was with Patton from africa to bastogne as a scout (he passed that to myself), both parents USAF, sister US Army.
scouts out!! you cant spell wimp without MP you cant spell lost without LT


Here's a picture of my grandfather....he served with the Heavy Mortar Company, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division; Korea August 51-June 52 as a Corporal.

I have tried to model my life around what this man has taught me. We found out in October that he has lung cancer, doc's gave him up to a year.

"Remember No Matter How Good You Are, There's Always Somone Luckier Or Better Than You"

I have looked at this thread many times and every time I get choked up when I see all these brave men who were in their prime, and think about all they had went through only to come back home and build this country into the superpower that it was. I am lucky enough to still have my father here at home where my wife and I take care of hm and my mother, he is 83 and she is 87 both in failing health and would be in a home if we were not here. I look at his photos from Berlin where he was stationed right after VJ day. He was training for the invasion of Japan. This was truly the Greatest Generation!!! God bless them...

9-11-2001 is my generations Pearl Harbor Never forget, Never give up the fight for freedom.... "To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public ..... It is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.” “Roosevelt in the Kansas City Star”, 14 May 7, 1918 Death to Cop Killer Wesley Clark (aka cocksucker) may he fry in hell



My great great (great?) grandfather was General Daniel Butterfield of Civil War fame - most notable was his writing of Taps.

I find it particularly moving since I work at a military college now and hear Taps played every night.

My grandfather on my father's side retired as a Colonel, his claim to fame was that he was one of General Westmoreland's personal helo pilots during Vietnam.

My father was a career naval aviator, and intelligence officer.
Wish I had, or could still get the Pic of my Grandfather- Family issues, unfortunately. I can remember it sitting proudly in my Grandparents living room, until he died in the '90's from Prostate Cancer. Then, my Grandma did "something" with it. I have no idea what that meant though.

Proud man, and proud Pole. He started off as Polish Cavalry at the start of the war, captured by the Nazi's and sent to a work farm. Escaped, was shot three times during, and was found by the British, and eventually finished off the war fighting for them. Maybe under the Polish Brigade, I don't know. That side of the family was never exactly forthcoming with our history/ancestry, let alone military history. It's sad, but kinda understandable. My Grandmother was OTR from the Nazi's with her first son throughout the war, because she grew up in a predominately Jewish neighbourhood and sounded like them- but was actually Catholic (from what I've read, which isn't much, Hitler didn't like the Catholics much either). God knows, and forbid, what the hell happened out there to her and her son. She met my Papa just after the war. I've found his name being awarded the "Virtuti Militaria", it's at the same level of a Victoria Cross or MoH. I have no idea if it really is him, but our last name is not very common, though his first is. It would be wonderful if I could ever get that photo of him, or even confirm he was awarded it.

I miss my Papa, he is the first person I think of on Remembrance day. Though he passed when I was a teenager and never really new him that well, I'd like to think we have common bond now and we understand each other more now. Though he wouldn't have liked it, he would have been proud to see me in uniform.
Captain Vesa Alakulppi, US Army



C CO, 2ND BN, 3RD INF RGT, 199 INF BDE

Born in Rovaniemi, Finland April 23 1941. KIA May 14 1968, South Vietnam.

He was posthumously awarded the Silver star because of his actions on the day he was killed.

He would have been my cousin from my mother´s side, if he were still alive.



And then my biggest hero, who made me the man i am today, my father.

He served as a Fighter pilot in the Finnish air force. Unfortunately, he passed away unexpectedly at the age of 54, last week.

My maternal Great Grandpa and Grandma. Grandpa Ben served with K Co, 147th Infantry Regt, 37th Infantry Division in the Meuse-Argonne. Photo is circa 1919.





His son, William. I don't know alot about his service, but he was apparently stationed at Wright Patterson AFB.




And another, in New Mexico




My paternal Grandpa Norman, who served in the Army in WWII.




A write-up from a platoon buddy of his;

MEMBER OF THE 807TH TANK DESTROYER BATTALION. SERVED 1943-1946. 1944-1945, WAS IN CONSTANT COMBAT IN THE EUROPEAN THEATER OF WAR.
MEMBER OF COMPANY B; WAS A 3-INCH ANTI-TANK GUN CREW MEMBER AND AFTER THE RHINE CROSSING WAS ONE OF THE CREW OF A M-18 HELLCAT TANK DESTROYER TANK. SURVIVED THE WAR.

(second from right)



And, my Pop. Around 1966, in his Fire Dept. Dress...




___________________________________________
“Perhaps I did not change the world. Perhaps there is still injustice in the world. But there will be a child who will live because men left the security they enjoyed in their home country to come to his. And this child will learn in the new schools that have been built. He will walk his streets not worried about whether or not his leader’s henchmen are going to come and kidnap him. He will grow into a fine man who will pursue every opportunity his heart could desire. He will have the gift of freedom, which I have enjoyed for so long. If my life buys the safety of a child who will one day change this world, then I know that it was all worth it.”       - SGT William Stacy, USMC

Joined: 12/7/04        Location: Texas
Jackedco, I think I can help a little with a couple of pics.
#6, with ship. The light pole to the left of the pic looks like light poles that were used near the locks on the Panama canal. I've seen then in old pics and found some in the jungle near the Gatun locks when I was there. The ship looks like it could be raised up in one of the locks.

#8, looks like it could have been taken at Mare Island Naval Base in CA. There is a wooded park across from the main barack building. The park has old cannon, torpedoes, etc on cement displays. There is also a bandstand there, like the one in the background .
Looks like he didn't like his tie too tight.

Dave

"Keep that cheap, wail'n slut quiet!" A.J. Maggott

Found this picture the other night while going through old photo albums.



My grandfather, T-4 Virgil Harper, 80th Recon Troop, part of the 101st in WWII.

Grandpa Harper was also awarded the Bronze Star for his actions during the Bulge.

And if you're wondering- yes, the sense of humor has been passed down from generation to generation.

______________________________

Trust in God --and press-check. You cannot ignore danger and call it faith. - Duke

My great uncle served as an infantryman in the 32nd Infantry Division during WWII and my grandpa retired as a LTC from the Army Reserve although he never had any active service. I wish I had more info about their service but both are deceased so it's a bit hard to find.


Grandpa Keith standing in Rome sometime very shortly after it's fall, he was a carpenter and draftsman so it was only natural that he ended up as a Combat Engineer. He participated in Operation Torch, Husky, and Avalanche. Was at Monte Cassino for the bridge buildings across the Rapido river. Unfortunately I never was able to meet him as he passed before I was born. Oh on a side note, since he was a draftsman and carpenter they put him to work in North Africa finding mines, rendering them safe, destroying them and then drawing how he managed to do it. I guess I'm carrying on a bit of a family tradition.

Please note: not an aspiring inner city "yout" trying to turn my life around...  one "g" two "oo's" like NPH's 80's era TV show.  

 

If you have to ask your buddy if you are on fire, you are four to five seconds behind the "stop, drop and roll" power curve.

quote:
Originally posted by EODDoogie:since he was a draftsman and carpenter they put him to work in North Africa finding mines, rendering them safe, destroying them and then drawing how he managed to do it. I guess I'm carrying on a bit of a family tradition.


Thats cool as hell.

______________________________

Trust in God --and press-check. You cannot ignore danger and call it faith. - Duke



This is my Grandfather who served aboard the USS Saratoga CV-3. He died when I was very young so I never got to hear any stories from him, but I've gone to some of the reunions and met a lot of awesome guys that were onboard the same timeframe. Those are some tough guys right there.
quote:
Originally posted by ElbowsNC:
My great great (great?) grandfather was General Daniel Butterfield of Civil War fame - most notable was his writing of Taps.

I find it particularly moving since I work at a military college now and hear Taps played every night.


Didn't know him the first time I saw this. After shooting with him, I swear to God the General looks exactly like Elbows, but with more hair on both his face and his head.

- The unadventurous existence of a well-behaved citizen, engaged in earning a moderate living in a humble capacity, leaves completely unsatisfied all that part of his nature which, if he had lived 400,000 years ago, would have found ample scope in the search for food, in cutting off the heads of enemies, and in escaping the attentions of tigers.



My Grandfather Edward Ray Mayo Sr. Served in the Air Force. Unknown dates, he never would talk about it. He was born on 07-18-1935 and passed on Sat June 25th, 2011. I learned today that I was given his M1 Carbine that he kept next to his bed. He was one of my biggest role models growing up and I'm going to miss him.

_________________________________________________________

 

(1*)

 

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell

My paternal Grandfather, Michael Egan: Couldn't serve in WWI because he didn't have US citizenship yet. Instead he opted to work for the war effort in an airplane factory.

My Father, John Egan: Volunteered, U.S. Navy, 8 December 1941, discharged 18 December 1945. Combat vet of the South Pacific, served as a radioman/tailgunner in an OS2-U Kingfisher on the U.S.S. California (BB-41). Plane was forced down during invasion of the Phillipines, where he spent three days in the jungle, working his way to the invasion beaches. A proud veteran, and my life-long hero.

My paternal uncle Michael Egan, US Army, ETO WWII, not alot known by me about his service.

My maternal uncle Jack Kane, U.S. Navy Intelligence, WWII, later wooed postwar by the FBI during his service with the San Francisco Police Department.

Maternal uncle Joseph Kane, US Army ETO, WWII. Battle of the Bulge veteran, great guy. Died, 2002.

Maternal uncle Robert Kane, USMC PTO, WWII. WIA South Pacific, later died in 1974 as a result of wounds suffered in combat. War has a long reach...

I was fortunate to meet and know all of them except my Uncle Jack. As a result, I spent my youth growing up feeling like I was living among giants and heroes. Every last one of them were humble gentlemen, well deserving of the freedom they protected.

'Sit Terra Levis Tibi.'

Pat


My Grandfather, CPT Albert B Head Sr. in formation, second from the right, The day before the Invasion of Normandy. He was a Company Commander with 4th ID, and received the Bronze Star and Purple Heart at Utah Beach, June 6th, 1944.

This is the only digital photo I have of him, but I have a ton of originals which I might have to scan. My family has a long history of service (we are Sons of the Revolution, with family documented at Cowpens, Camden, and Kings Mountain. All of my brothers and I are Infantrymen) - to include a great uncle who left the US in 1914 to fight with the British in WWI - he then transfered to an American regiment when the Doughboys arrived in 1917.
__________________________
"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

-John Stuart Mill

http://marshall-hereistand.blogspot.com
My family has fought in every war this country has been in, but Micajah Frasher's story is one that's always had a special place in family lore. The following is in the National Archives. It's part of a deposition written in 1836 in support of his application for his Revolutionary War Service pension. I guess he figured it never hurts to drop some names when needed.

"I, Micager Frazeur of Rock Creek, Jackson County, State of Missouri, was born the 25th day of December, 1753, in the county of Albemarle, VA, and when a youth moved to Amherst Co., VA, where I grew up and was drafted into the service of the United States and marched to Albemarle Barracks under Captain Richard Ballinger, which place was commanded by Colonel Taylor, where I remained one month and was discharged and returned to Amherst Co. Not long after I returned home, I enlisted under Benjamin Taliferro for 18 months and marched under command of Captain Samuel Cabell from Amherst Co. down James River by Richmond to Williamsburg where he joined General Marques De Lafayette who was engaged in battle by the British and the morning when the British left in their vessels down the river.

Shortly after we got to Williamsburg several companies of us went under command of Major Willis Cabell down to Amelia County to Hood's Fort, which was commanded at that time by Colonel Dabney. I also saw Major Hardiman there and at different times I saw Colonel Merriweather and General Lafayette. We were marching to the Flowery Hundred then back to Hood's Fort, then to the Flowery Hundred, etc. Before the expiration of my time, I was taken sick with yellow fever, and was very ill, and a relative of mine procured a furlough from General Lafayette for me and took me home, where I remained until I recovered and not long afterward I was drafted for 60 days and marched from Amherst County under Captain Dawson to Williamsburg and to Hood's Fort and to the Flowery Hundred and was under Colonel Dabney; and at the end of 60 days I was discharged and returned home. And after that I was drafted again for 3 months and I served in the same part of the country I had been before, and at the end of the 3 months I was discharged and returned home, where I remained about one year. Then I removed to Wilkes County, North Carolina, where I remained about two years, in which time I went to Amherst County, Virginia, where I married.

Then moved to Pittsylvania County, Virginia where I remained about three years, then I moved to the western part of Virginia in a county on the Sandy River, where I remained about twelve months, when I came to the County of Jackson and State of Missouri.

All the discharge I ever had burned in the conflagaration of a dwelling house; and I do not know of any person near me who can testify to those facts. I hereby relinquish every claim whatsoever to a pension or annuity except the present, and I declare that my name is not on any pension roll of any agency or state."



My better half has a bit of a connection to the Revolutionary War as well. Her second cousin had a teeny bit of a role in it from what I hear.

Joined: 1/19/2010   Location: West Virginia

Thought I would update my entry a bit:

My Grandfather passed away on 7 August 2011 after losing the battle with Lung Cancer that had spread. There's not a day that goes by I don't miss my best friend, but I am honored to of had him in my life. My Grandfather was drafted into Korea, then when he returned home to Kansas he continued as a farmer. This man had so little but gave so much.

This is one of his last pictures, he wanted to go on one final train ride. My Grandfather enjoyed trains, often wished he had became an engineer.

My father, has served in the Kansas Air National Guard since the early 1980's. He's currently still there....

This picture is from one of his deployments to Oman, the Miami Dolphin Cheerleader stopped in!

I've served in the Army & was deployed to Iraq in 2003-2005. I later transferred to the Kansas Air National Guard, was neat serving with my father. I was selected to return to the Active Duty Air Force where I've been serving for the past 4 years. I am preparing to separate for the final time, my last day in uniform is the 31st of October!

Me firing an AK47, prior to deploying with an Army Team as an Air Force member, this was a nice honor.

"Remember No Matter How Good You Are, There's Always Somone Luckier Or Better Than You"

Here's a shot of my Mother's maternal grandfather, Capt. (I think) Robert Somerville, USACE. I don't know a lot about him off the top of my head, other than he was a native-born Scot (Glasgow) who emigrated to the States in the early 1900's. I kind of remember Grandmom saying he was a railroad man and did a good bit of work in Russia on the trans-Siberian railroad but I can't remember if that was before or after WWI.

There really isn't a huge military tradition in my family--I did my bit but before me you have to go back to the gent in the photo, then to the Civil War (distant relatives on both sides of that one, mine for the Union, Mrs. JV's on the other side), and before that to my 5th- or 6th-great grandfather who was on General Washington's raid across the Delaware on Christmas, 1776.

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"Now with more death power!"

 

Joined: 3/22/09     Location:  'nooga

Great post. My grandfather was a SeaBee in the Pacific in WWII and my father flew on USMC medivac in Vietnam. My thanks and respect to these men and all others mentioned here and serving today.

People push you to your limits, but when you finally explode and fight back, you are the asshole!

My Unlce, Marine Infantry During the Vietnam War. He's on the right with a sweet stash.

My Brother. 13B E-6. Old picture at his Purple heart ceremony.


My self, My Dad and my brother a year ago at a wedding.


God bless! I'm having a hard time getting photo's to work. Alright I got the pictures working. The pictures are a little old from my brother he got pinned last month but no new pics.
Instrument Of War.

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