Never forget who came before you

Amazing thread!

Sadly only a couple pictures of my grandpa - still with us in his mid 90s, still volunteering on Honor Flights. Says he'll be the last WWII vet alive (10th Air Force/Army Air Corps) I believe it.

His 'wall of fame', complete with kukri machete (given to him during his capture/detainment in Burma), and his medals...Distinguished Flying Cross is the one he's most proud of.



Cattle drive in his mid 70s...the man is a beast!


Approaching their 70th anniversary...

"Do not pray for easy lives.  Pray to be stronger men" - JFK

For as long as I can remember I have had this box. My fathers side of the family have never respected anyone let alone their elders, I suppose it's for the best that I stay as far away as possible. But I digress, the family story is that Donald, my great grand father, died in WWII due to friendly fire. I'm not sure anyone on my fathers side ever thought twice about him so I submit these pictures to honor a family member I never knew.





Sorry, having trouble with the images.

"May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one."

quote:
Approaching their 70th anniversary...

That's so cool.

LIG, hang on to that and take care of it (I have no doubt that's exactly what you're doing). That's a treasure right there.

Those of us who know must save those that don't from those that think they do.

"If you count 'three', mister, you'll never hear the man count 'ten'".-John Wayne as Sean Thornton in The Quiet Man

My anger will be aroused, and I will kill you with the sword; your wives will become widows and your children fatherless.-Exodus 22:24

Lostingermany, that is one hell of a second post. We all don't know much about you yet but this effort and rememberance speaks volumes.

Here is a tip of the glass to Pfc Schneider, Donald J. and to you for never forgetting.

Respectfully,

RD

 

.......................................................................................................

For those of you who believe history began when you were born, educate yourselves. ~ Pat Rogers

Adversity can shape and perfect us, and horrible adversity can make us champions. ~ Maskirovka

 

Joined: 26 Aug 2008           Location: The Libitard Center of Oregon

Note: If you see "edited" assume it was to adjust for fat-finger typing.

quote:
Originally posted by RidgeDog:
Lostingermany, that is one hell of a second post. We all don't know much about you yet but this effort and rememberance speaks volumes.

Here is a tip of the glass to Pfc Schneider, Donald J. and to you for never forgetting.

Respectfully,

RD


Thank you for the kind words, As soon as I saw this this thread I knew it was a good place to start with him. I have been looking at those ancestry.com commercials and thinking about spending some money to find out more about him. Are there any military registries I can search for more information? Or is that a military only thing? Thank you either way.

"May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one."

quote:
Originally posted by McYogi:
I posted this picture in the ANZAC Day Memorial thread a while ago, but I had been emailed the picture and didn't have any more info on it.

I got hold of his record this morning. The man on the right is Oscar Ohare Solvander. My great-grandfather. He is on the beaches of Gallipolli in that photo.

He was a machine gunner with 7th Wellington Infantry Battalion.

That's of some importance to me, because almost a hundred years later, I'm in that exact same unit (7th Battalion, Bravo Company, here in Wellington) doing the exact same job as he did.



That is a fantastic photo and an even better story... I suppose high rates of fire run in the family. A tip of the hat to your great grand-father.

"May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one."

quote:
Originally posted by McYogi:
I posted this picture in the ANZAC Day Memorial thread a while ago, but I had been emailed the picture and didn't have any more info on it.

I got hold of his record this morning. The man on the right is Oscar Ohare Solvander. My great-grandfather. He is on the beaches of Gallipolli in that photo.

He was a machine gunner with 7th Wellington Infantry Battalion.

That's of some importance to me, because almost a hundred years later, I'm in that exact same unit (7th Battalion, Bravo Company, here in Wellington) doing the exact same job as he did.



That is absolutely, utterly awesome mate!

=======================
Forward!
Where we are, where we belong, where we should be.

  

Location: Back in Bris-Vegas, wondering at the bright lights of the big smoke

One of my greatest role models, my Grandfather, passed away last night. I never truly knew how much he meant and how much I could learn until he departed from this world.

Harold Davis enlisted at age 16 during WWII in the Navy, deployed to the Pacific, but they found out his age and kicked him out, so he went to the Army recruiter at 17 and signed up for the Air Corps. He flew as part of air crews over Germany multiple times, and was part of the flight crew that brought judges over for the Nuremberg trials. He got out after a few years, married his sweetheart -my grandmother- and started a family. When Korea started, he jumped back in to the service and continued working in and around planes. After he got out, he got a job manufacturing aircraft and worked on almost every fast attack plane that the US military has, he even helped improve the F16's ejection seat system.

He sent all 4 kids through college, including my mother, and when each of his 12 grandchildren were born, started a college investment fund for each of us. When I was born, he bought a bottle of 18 year single malt scotch, and when I was just about to head off to college, he invited me over for Texas Hold 'Em night with his Army buddies, where he slammed the bottle down on the table and told me that I was going to finish the bottle and like it by the end of the night. He and his buddies helped out, thankfully.

Whenever anyone asked how he was doing, he would respond with "well, I'm sober, but that can be fixed"

I hope that I am 1/2 the man he was. Safe Travels, Grandpa.
quote:
Originally posted by chickenfuker:
One of my greatest role models, my Grandfather, passed away last night. I never truly knew how much he meant and how much I could learn until he departed from this world.

Harold Davis enlisted at age 16 during WWII in the Navy, deployed to the Pacific, but they found out his age and kicked him out, so he went to the Army recruiter at 17 and signed up for the Air Corps. He flew as part of air crews over Germany multiple times, and was part of the flight crew that brought judges over for the Nuremberg trials. He got out after a few years, married his sweetheart -my grandmother- and started a family. When Korea started, he jumped back in to the service and continued working in and around planes. After he got out, he got a job manufacturing aircraft and worked on almost every fast attack plane that the US military has, he even helped improve the F16's ejection seat system.

He sent all 4 kids through college, including my mother, and when each of his 12 grandchildren were born, started a college investment fund for each of us. When I was born, he bought a bottle of 18 year single malt scotch, and when I was just about to head off to college, he invited me over for Texas Hold 'Em night with his Army buddies, where he slammed the bottle down on the table and told me that I was going to finish the bottle and like it by the end of the night. He and his buddies helped out, thankfully.

Whenever anyone asked how he was doing, he would respond with "well, I'm sober, but that can be fixed"

I hope that I am 1/2 the man he was. Safe Travels, Grandpa.


Folks like your Grandpa are truly one of our country's greatest national treasures, and we're losing them so quickly these days. I am deeply sorry for your loss.

Godspeed, Mr. Davis, and thank you for your service and your devotion to your family.

"I always wanted to be a priest or a fireman; now I'm both." - Fr. Mychal Judge, OFM; 11 MAY 1933 - 11 SEP 2001

"It's morning again in America." - Ronald W. Reagan 1984 re-election campaign



My uncle Pfc. Werner Milton, 31st Division infantryman, being congratulated by Maj. Gen. Calrence A. Martin, commanding general of the "Dixie Division". He was awarded the Bronze Star for his part in repelling a pre-dawn Banzai attack in central Mindanao (Philippines). To quote the Army news release "The fighting left 72 dead Japs when the smoke of the battle had cleared away. Pfc. Milton & three buddies knocked out an enemy machine gun during the fanatical attack."

Uncle Werner, my father & his parents got out of Germany as Hitler was coming into power - not popular to be a Jew in Germany at that time. Changed their name from Mielzynski to Milton at Ellis Island, as did many other immigrants with hard to pronounce last names. Settled in Memphis Tennessee as there was a family there who agreed to sponsor them & help them find jobs. For some reason Werner got drafted & my dad did not.

I never met my uncle as he moved away after returning from the war. My dad tried many times to find him but was not successful. He said that Werner was a changed man when he returned - likely PTSD but they had no name for the condition back then.

 


Joined: 6SEPT2012 from Benton, Illinois Website: www.Precision.Works

Chief Tecumseh "So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart"

Some history on the 31st ID "Dixie Division" in WWII ...

In late 1943, the Division was activated and prepared to move out to enter the war. In January, 1944, the Dixie Division boarded transport ships at Hampton Roads VA and shipped out. Their destination was the Pacific Theater of Operations.

After a brief training stop in Oro Bay, New Guinea, the Dixie Division was sent into action. The 124th Regiment assisted the 32nd Division in the vicinity of the Driniumor River, New Guinea while the 155th and 167th were sent in on the Wakde-Sarmi camaign. During the course of these battles, the Regiments of the Dixie Division killed over 4,000 Japanese soldiers, wiping out 2 entire Regiments and broke the back of the Japanese 18th Army

In September of 1944, the 31st Division consolidated and invaded the island of Morotai, Southeast of the Phillipine islands. Over the next seven months, the 31st Division fought on Morotai, killing the Japanese defenders 2 or 3 at a time. The difficult fighting only further prepared the men of the Dixie Division for their next mission. The invasion of the island of Mindanao, the southern most island in the Philippines.

The 31st Division stored ashore at Mindanao, meeting very little resistance. As the Division pushed north, with the 124th Regiment on point, they met stiff resistance from the head-high cogongrass. While they struggled to continue the advance, the Japanese took the advantage and opened fire on the Americans. For six hours, the battle raged only to be concluded when the Americans had completely routed the Japanese forces. As they neared the Maramag Airstrip Number 1, the Americans encountered stiff resistance from Japanese forces who had dug in under the roots of trees. For the next 7 days, all 3 battalions of the 124th fought to eliminate the fanatical resistance.

Shortly after the Japanese were driven from the woods, the 155th Regiment took point. After meeting light resistance, they came upon a group of Japanese soldiers sunning themselves next to a stream. The lead company opened fire and killed 96 of the soldiers catching them completely off-guard. No other Japanese came to their aid because the American rifle fire was drowned out by the roaring stream.

After securing Mindanao, the American forces continued on to liberate the rest of the Philippine islands. The men of the Dixie Division had fought in places where the only resupply available was by air drop. Yet they continued to fight and defeated an enemy that was greater in numbers and had more time to prepare for the battles. In December, 1945, the Dixie Division returned home and was deactivated on December 21, 1945 at Camp Stoneman, CA and returned to National Guard duty.

 


Joined: 6SEPT2012 from Benton, Illinois Website: www.Precision.Works

Chief Tecumseh "So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart"

My maternal great-grandfather was an infantry private in WWI. I have his company picture from LaSuze, France hanging on the wall of the office in my house.

My paternal grandfather was a Company Commander in WWII, leading a company of Norwegian-Americans in France, Belgium, Germany, and Norway.

My maternal grandfather was a Korean war vet in the Navy and was a Seabee. He was so poor when he grew up that the Navy gave him dentures when he enlisted.

My Father is a Vietnam-era vet (he was never sent to Vietnam). He was a US Army Signal Corps Officer (reserves).

My Uncle is a career Marine, who retired in 2000 as a Master Gunnery Sergeant with 36 years in service. He volunteered for enlistment in the USMC so that he could choose what he was going to do, vice getting drafted and getting stuck in something. He grew up so poor that he showed up to Parris Island with carboard in his shoes to cover the holes.

My Aunt was a Sailor for about 8 years. She grew up dirt poor in South Dakota, and learned to drive in the Navy. She drove Admirals and Captains around her base.

I guess I come from a family of poor folks that aren't afraid of hard work. I was glad to enlist in Sep. 2001. I worked my way up the ranks, and I was a Company Commander in Afghanistan.

I'll be proud to display my Bronze Star Medal on the shelf next to my Grandfather's and my Uncle's.

My Grandpa. Served as a 81mm mortarman during and after WWII.

 

During WWII he served somewhere in Eastern Switzerland, leaving behind his family in Thorgovia. Which was declared non defendable in case of a german invasion. So the soldiers would move to the reduit in central Switzerlands mountains, while their families would be left behind.

 

After the war he returned to his homeland, married and became a farmer. In his sparetime he enjoyed targetshooting with his K31. Some years before his death he passed me his K31, which I later returned to his son, who should have gotten it in the first place.

 

He wasn't a soldier, but a citizen. I miss him. Still remember how proud he was of me when I showed up at a family reunion in dress-uniform right after being promoted to NCO.

My grandfather was a top turret gunner and flight engineer on a B17 during WWII in the 8th Air Force.  He just had his 91st birthday last week so I've been thinking about him a lot lately.  Here's picture of him (far left) and his bomber crew right before taking off for England in '44.

 

 

He went on after the war to serve a few years in the Air Force Reserves, marry my Grandmother, graduate as a mechanical engineer from Purdue University (where he was when he first joined the Army, and raise a wonderful family and had a small farm.  Especially after reading his journals from the war I dare say I've got a lot to live up to in life.

My Grandfather's service leaves me speechless.

The highlights:

  • Began as a Private and ended up commanding his unit.
  • At time of his promotion to Major, was the youngest parachute group field officer, just 26 years old.
  • Four times wounded.
  • Bronze and Silver Stars.
  • Accepted surrenders of German 4th and 21st Armies.
  • Four invasions, nine campaigns, and 307 days of combat.
  • Saw combat at/in Kasserine, Salerno, Cassino, Anzio, D-Day, Nigmegen, the Ardennes, and Berlin Occupation.

He met my Grandmother, a nurse and WAC Captain in Berlin; they had six children.

 

 

He's the tall blonde-haired gentleman on the right.

 

Here's the source of most of what I know, a newspaper article from 1990. He died in 1992.

 

 

I've been in touch with his former driver and he has been mentioned in a couple of books.

 

"It's when you fuck up that you will hear from your peers, not when you are doing your job. We expect people to do their jobs, and don't praise them like six year olds who successfully tied their shoes when they do. " - Fatty

 

If in doubt about the tone of my post, please refer to avatar.

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