.50 Cal Carriage, Employment and Sustainment

Hey all, given that this is a predominately American board and you are the most experienced users of the .50 cal I was hoping to pick your brains for any info you might have on the use of the .50. My reserve unit is one of the ones selected for the Direct Fire Support task and we've been given .50 cals and are starting to run courses to train up a platoon. Long term plan is to give us G-Wagons, but for now we're stuck loading them in the back of a truck and humping it and the ammo to a defensive position.

Myself and some others have been going through info we can find online on machine gun use, carrying and using them from WW1 to current day and any country we can find to further build our knowledge and see what useful stuff we can pull and add into our own training/fire back up to the infantry school to possibly incorporate into the publications and future training. 

Our current platoon organization is 4 sections of 2 guns, with a crew of 4 per gun. Since we have no vehicle for it we're really just looking at using it on the defensive at the time being. Anyone have any experience from training or operations, or know where we can look for info? We have a bunch of older publications and reports from WW1 and WW2, but we're looking for whatever we can get our hands on to help expand our knowledge base.

 

Freedom is a gift, not a right, so here we stand and here we fight

Original Post

I participated in manpacking a .50 a long time ago.  I distinctly remember it wasn't any fun.  However, I doubt I really have any firsthand knowledge of particular value.

More and more, it seems that non-traditional smaller vehicles (ATVs, 6x6 John Deere, Polaris, etc) are being used to move mortars and heavy sustainment loads.  Maybe look to those for ease of movement.

I know in A'stan, we, with some Afghan border police, moved a Mk 19 into an overwatch position that completely surprised some assholes.  I don't think the gunner got any on target (shots were well over 1200 meters), but running that little Ford Ranger around with the GL and a bunch of ammo was really fun, and it went places you wouldn't expect it to.

Tankersteve

In Yorktown, VA.          Joined August 2008

Gov't Civilian, after retiring from active duty in 2015. 

 

'One's own open sore never smells.'  - Haitian proverb

Have you checked this one out?  Apparently it’s open source, I just pulled it up on my phone without an ID.

https://www.marines.mil/Portal...ions/MCTP%203-01C%20(Formerly%20MCWP%203-15.1).pdf?ver=2016-08-02-094831-553

"A pirate is not the sort of a man who generally cares to pay his bills...and after a time the work of endeavoring to collect debts from pirates was given up."

          -Frank R. Stockton

Thanks for the link Gunner, I actually downloaded  that a short while ago after finding it elsewhere on here. Looks mostly similar to stuff we already have in our publications but I'll definitely take an in depth look to see what/if anything is different.

 

tankersteve posted:

I participated in manpacking a .50 a long time ago.  I distinctly remember it wasn't any fun.  However, I doubt I really have any firsthand knowledge of particular value.

Any advice on taking readings off the T&E mech? We use the C2 sight which is pretty easy to use, especially at night my so far brief experience (2 week HMG gunner course) with the T&E mech makes it seem like a big pain in the ass. A few of us have talked about maybe applying chalk or something else to the numbers on the mechanism and the traversing bar to make it easier to read at night.

Also, any chance you remember what kind of ammo load you were carrying dismounted? All our practical experience from people we know who used these guns in the past were mainly vehicle mounted on M113s or RG-31s, or static in a FOB. Bit of a different situation than what we'll be doing for the time being.

GPMG with C2 sight

ATVs or some other vehicle would be bomb, but impossible to achieve. We have no resources or say in getting something like that. Our unit vehicle fleet is a handful of civilian trucks and transit vans, a couple of MSVSs and maybe a milcot (militarized Silverado).

Freedom is a gift, not a right, so here we stand and here we fight

As I remember, with Alice frames, we had the pack trays to carry 2x boxes of ammo per bearer.  Two ammo bearers who rotated their load to others.   Ours was really an exercise in moving the gun, tripod, and 4 boxes of ammo.  We didn't have sustainment loads.

Markings on the T&E - sounds like you are on the right path.  I'm sure others will have some cool luminescent TTPs.

Tankersteve

In Yorktown, VA.          Joined August 2008

Gov't Civilian, after retiring from active duty in 2015. 

 

'One's own open sore never smells.'  - Haitian proverb

there is a section on the T&E in the US Army TC 3-22.240 (medium machine gun) and

TC 3-22.50 (Heavy machine gun).  you can also try contacting your Infantry school and the US Infantry school (you might have an LNO there)  to get copies of the machine gun theory classes.  (The one I took at OBC was taught by an Allied SGM).   

  Unfortunately, must of my experience with the M2 was free gunning in the sandbox.  The only recommendation I can make is to practice making range cards.

 

___________________________________________________________________

I'm either dead right, or horribly wrong. Either way the results should be entertaining.

 

"Shoot the MOTHERF$%^ER until he changes shape or catches fire"  the PAT ROGERS

tankersteve posted:

As I remember, with Alice frames, we had the pack trays to carry 2x boxes of ammo per bearer.  Two ammo bearers who rotated their load to others.   Ours was really an exercise in moving the gun, tripod, and 4 boxes of ammo.  We didn't have sustainment loads.

Markings on the T&E - sounds like you are on the right path.  I'm sure others will have some cool luminescent TTPs.

Tankersteve

Repack ammunition to those 'double depth' .50 cans (60mm round cans?): better can/round mass ration to carry on a pack frame.

Have seen M2 HB strapped to a bamboo carry pole: makes a 2 man carry (shoulder or waist) over uneven ground easier/faster.

Look at the tripod: can you attach carry handles/straps improvised from rifle slings?

Modify a light pack to be the CES kit: C2 sight box, oil can, tools, cleaning gear etc.

What are you doing for aiming posts?

I wouldn't worry about transport. The whole idea of tasking these reserve units  was so that the reg force units wouldn't have to man these positions ;direct fire , mortars , pioneer [ huge mistake  IMHO]. You aren't going to be operating in a vacuum .Whatever  "parent" unit you get attached to will provide logistical support.

 Just concentrate on maintaining proficiency in your drills.

Eat til you are tired sleep til you are hungry

firemission4mortars posted:

I wouldn't worry about transport. The whole idea of tasking these reserve units  was so that the reg force units wouldn't have to man these positions ;direct fire , mortars , pioneer [ huge mistake  IMHO]. You aren't going to be operating in a vacuum .Whatever  "parent" unit you get attached to will provide logistical support.

 Just concentrate on maintaining proficiency in your drills.

"Will" or "Should"?  I haven't worked with the Canadian forces in a while, but in the US forces sometimes the support of attachments slips through the cracks.  While I agree that crew drills are where the majority of the training time is best spent, it might not be a bad thing to be able to self transport.     

___________________________________________________________________

I'm either dead right, or horribly wrong. Either way the results should be entertaining.

 

"Shoot the MOTHERF$%^ER until he changes shape or catches fire"  the PAT ROGERS

In Korea in the 80s we took the .50s off the ring mounts on our 2.5 Ton trucks and broke them down into 4-man loads:  receiver; barrel and a can of ammo; tripod, T&E and a can of ammo; and two cans of ammo.  These were humped in packs, on frames, or over shoulders, as only foot infantry can.

Fellas were amazed to watch headquarters dogs hump those bitches up and down the yamas (hills and ridges) just like toting mortars.  Even more amazing was watching half-inch death raking over a target from the support line.  Add another dude and you hump in the TVS-5 Starlight or a thermal.

"Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition."

Image result for dismounted .50 caliber

Seyek posted:

Any advice on taking readings off the T&E mech? We use the C2 sight which is pretty easy to use, especially at night my so far brief experience (2 week HMG gunner course) with the T&E mech makes it seem like a big pain in the ass. A few of us have talked about maybe applying chalk or something else to the numbers on the mechanism and the traversing bar to make it easier to read at night.

Maybe luminescent sight paint?

I put this (https://www.truglo.com/accesso...brite-paint-kits.asp) on the sights of one of my pistols and was thoroughly underwhelmed with it, but I pulled it out of a toolbox that had been sitting in the shop for a few years. Fresh stuff might work better, or someone may know of a better product. I’d try thorough degreasing and then lining the marks on the traverse bar and T&E with this. 

Learning has occurred. Life is good. 

Glow tape is always gonna be brighter than glow paint. Get clear electrical tape to keep it on places like legs of the tripod, etc. 

You can write on GITD tapes. So, can label parts of the T&E adjustments to turn to the right azimuth and elev in the dark. 

It will glow through paper, so if you really wanted, you could laser print a new azimuth ring, maybe on weatherproof sticker and glue it on top of a glow-taped ring.   

Simpler and if your handwriting sucks: they make GITD labelmaker tapes. Someone over there with a desk has a label maker, and you can probably get them to buy some glow tape for funzies around the office, and use a bit of it for your purposes. 

Keep UV keychain lights as part of everyone's personal kit, and somewhere in the gun kit, to brighten up the glow tapes. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

In Korea in the 80s we took the .50s off the ring mounts on our 2.5 Ton trucks and broke them down into 4-man loads:  receiver; barrel and a can of ammo; tripod, T&E and a can of ammo; and two cans of ammo.  These were humped in packs, on frames, or over shoulders, as only foot infantry can.

 

That is the equipment breakout I remember.  Not fondly, either...

Tankersteve

In Yorktown, VA.          Joined August 2008

Gov't Civilian, after retiring from active duty in 2015. 

 

'One's own open sore never smells.'  - Haitian proverb

Linz posted:
tankersteve posted:

As I remember, with Alice frames, we had the pack trays to carry 2x boxes of ammo per bearer.  Two ammo bearers who rotated their load to others.   Ours was really an exercise in moving the gun, tripod, and 4 boxes of ammo.  We didn't have sustainment loads.

Markings on the T&E - sounds like you are on the right path.  I'm sure others will have some cool luminescent TTPs.

Tankersteve

Repack ammunition to those 'double depth' .50 cans (60mm round cans?): better can/round mass ration to carry on a pack frame.

Have seen M2 HB strapped to a bamboo carry pole: makes a 2 man carry (shoulder or waist) over uneven ground easier/faster.

Look at the tripod: can you attach carry handles/straps improvised from rifle slings?

Modify a light pack to be the CES kit: C2 sight box, oil can, tools, cleaning gear etc.

What are you doing for aiming posts?

Might be able to get 60mm ammo cans, the 60 is retired but cans might still be around. We're more likely to just use the current can or just haul the belts in a pack to save the can weight. No C2 sights for these, there's no where to mount one though I'd love a new tripod with a C2 over the current tripod and T&E mech. Pole isn't a bad idea, if we're going into a defensive we'll have 6 ft pickets we could use if it makes carrying things easier.

Skedco litters are a good idea. Never thought of it, and we have them in the system so it might be possible to get a couple. We already have toboggans for the winter time for our arctic tents we'll likely be using to carry these too when there's snow out.

Luminescent paint for the T&E mech is a good idea, I'll see if we can get some to try out. Or glowtape.

firemission4mortars posted:

I wouldn't worry about transport. The whole idea of tasking these reserve units  was so that the reg force units wouldn't have to man these positions ;direct fire , mortars , pioneer [ huge mistake  IMHO]. You aren't going to be operating in a vacuum .Whatever  "parent" unit you get attached to will provide logistical support.

 Just concentrate on maintaining proficiency in your drills.

Drills will be our focus, but we're putting in the effort to make sure we know how to use them, move them, and support them, and as far as we've been made aware we're supposed to be able to provide a self sustaining machine gun platoon. I doubt that'll be the end result, but it's what we've got to work with so far and while we've had great experiences with the reg force before we've also had some less than stellar experiences. We want to make sure we're as ready as possible to do our job with minimal or no support, and if we can come up with useful experiences that can be passed back up to the school all the better.

 

 

 

Freedom is a gift, not a right, so here we stand and here we fight

Consider an M3A4 Hand Cart replica.

Here is a cart with a water cooled Browning .30 machine gun.

Soldiers from the 505th PIR showing the proper way to push and pull a cart.  Up to four Soldiers can move the cart.

This is my welding project.

These can be made by weldors, like me, so it isn't that hard.  The wheel axles needed to be machined smooth but that was the only thing I contracted out.  Cost is probably less than $600 if you research your materials.

Get bigger tires than these if you are going cross country.  19" front motorcycle wheels are ideal.

 

 

 

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Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"It makes no difference what men think of war," said the Judge.  "War endures. As well ask men what they think of stone.  War was always here. Before man was, war waited for him.  The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner.  That is the way it was and will be.  That way and not some other way.” Cormac McCarthy, "Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West"

Not bike tires? I'd think the very large diameter and reduced total weight would help. Get the fattest you can though.

One group I worked with used a cart (more like the size of a stretcher cart, with the bike tires but same idea) for a lot of equipment moving. Sorta brilliant, but it has a hard limit to what load it can take over what terrain. DO practice with it, and get used to what that is, and to hooking up other troops to pull; tugging is not horsepower on the wheels, and lots try to drive them like they are driving a car. Not the same thing. 

Removable wheels is nice to stow it, for repair, and just to keep it from rolling away sometimes. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

No .50 experience but always wondered why deer carts (specifically made to go offroad with heavy loads, and fold up) never got used. Moving a M2 or a Mk19 on foot would be a lot easier.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So low speed, i'm in Park.

"I could stand to hear a little more.." Jayne

Training is brief. Death is forever. PAY ATTENTION.

Joined: 6/14/03 1:02 PM

We used a lot of luminescent tape for T&E and other adjustments. 

At Polk we made use of wheeled stretchers and various carts for moving guns around. A cart would be pretty money if you could pull it off because you can leave the gun assembled, but not knowing your AO and other factors, not sure if it would be practical. 

 

Seyek posted:
Linz posted:
tankersteve posted:
 

Repack ammunition to those 'double depth' .50 cans (60mm round cans?): better can/round mass ration to carry on a pack frame.

Have seen M2 HB strapped to a bamboo carry pole: makes a 2 man carry (shoulder or waist) over uneven ground easier/faster.

Look at the tripod: can you attach carry handles/straps improvised from rifle slings?

Modify a light pack to be the CES kit: C2 sight box, oil can, tools, cleaning gear etc.

What are you doing for aiming posts?

Might be able to get 60mm ammo cans, the 60 is retired but cans might still be around. We're more likely to just use the current can or just haul the belts in a pack to save the can weight. No C2 sights for these, there's no where to mount one though I'd love a new tripod with a C2 over the current tripod and T&E mech. Pole isn't a bad idea, if we're going into a defensive we'll have 6 ft pickets we could use if it makes carrying things easier.

Skedco litters are a good idea. Never thought of it, and we have them in the system so it might be possible to get a couple. We already have toboggans for the winter time for our arctic tents we'll likely be using to carry these too when there's snow out.

Luminescent paint for the T&E mech is a good idea, I'll see if we can get some to try out. Or glowtape.

firemission4mortars posted:
 

 

 

C2A2: Somebody does.

Litter: have heard of someone taking a surplus litter, folding and replacing the canvas with clamps/strapping to hold the assembled gun, tripod & spare barrel- but not seen it myself.  This makes for a 4 man carry (what the US manuals recommend breaking the lot onto) plus a can of ammo on the back of each  person.  With the canvas gone, you could add additional hand straps to the middle of the poles for extra helpers or to assist in getting it out of a vehicle.

Pole carry: assembly is heavy enough without factoring in a 6 foot star picket: try bamboo.  Light, bit of flex, very strong & you can use for camnet support over your gun position.  Seen a 81mm mortar crew do the same.  Helps to have a bit of extra padding on your shoulder harness.

Spare barrel: Forgot to ask if you have to factor that into your load or not.

Those 'double fifty' cans are great but not easily available where I am.  I try and score one each US trip.  Also great for bulk 7.62x51mm link of a fixed position or vehicle: put a divider down the middle & you have lots of easy feeding link in an environment proof container.

Also...the Austrians use M2 variations in the ground role: How do they do things?  How do they move them around in snow?

Took me a bit, but who's old enough to remember their service in the Spanish Civil War or whenever this was issued? 

The Mount, Wheeled, Machine Gun M1. 

I suspect none in the system, but it's a cute design. Just an axle and trailing arm with a couple brackets: 

Yes, seem to be a couple sub-variants. Love how the MG is mounted with the tripod, so can be brought to fire immediately, or be dismounted on the tripod pretty fast. Etc.

Bet a modern one of these could be made to fold up smaller than a deer cart, maybe small enough to be a barely-packable load itself, so you could portage it over wheel-impassable areas, then still have the cart on the other side. 

http://www.smallarmsreview.com....cfm?idarticles=1994

 

The book above revealed to me (aside from the toboggan): 

Naturally, finding M4-anything that is not an AR is impossible with simple googles. Good luck. 

 

Nothing there either as I have to get back to work, but this is fun: 

https://www.forgottenweapons.c...17-machine-gun-cart/

And, comment they were in service at least CONUS into the 60s. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

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1168 posted:

If you have relatively even ground, make use of Skedco litters. 

We tried that once, and quickly had a trashed Skedco full of holes and a very dirty M2: 

Zero out of Five Stars, would not recommend

How far are you expecting to hump them? I'd think that'd play in ammo count...

Hopefully you guys can upgrade the Tripod and T&E like what we're using on the M2A1, it's a game changer (that fixed headspace is nice too). 

 

 

PRAISE THE FALLEN

SSG Kevin Roberts KIA 7-May-08         SPC Peter Courcy KIA 10-Feb-09

1Lt Nick Dewhirst KIA 20-July-08          PFC Jason Watson KIA 10-Feb-09

CPL Charles Gaffney KIA 24-Dec-08

 

Joined: 2/21/04          Location: Seattle,  WA

shoobe01 posted:

Took me a bit, but who's old enough to remember their service in the Spanish Civil War or whenever this was issued? 

The Mount, Wheeled, Machine Gun M1. 


Nothing there either as I have to get back to work, but this is fun: 

https://www.forgottenweapons.c...17-machine-gun-cart/

And, comment they were in service at least CONUS into the 60s. 

If you were going the cart method, find some second hand 'Walk Around The World' carts that someone is selling cheap.

Trouble is...what type of terrain & vegetation are we talking about?  Have seen a couple attempts to carry M2 84mm & rounds on carts...but most failed because of trees or uneven ground.  Hence the old WW2 'Jungle Cart' was pretty narrow & had bicycle size wheels.  This, however, looks usable...plus cheap & easy to make:

Related image

Related image

 

We (USMC war fighting lab and 3/7 ) experimented with deer carts, wagons and such along with crew serves out in 29 palms several (now that I think about it many.......oh shit I'm that guy now.....) years ago..... it ended poorly..... With gun crews carrying their shit and still dragging the empty cart through the sand and loose rock.  Those carts pictured up thread look better than the things that we were provided with though, and I'm sure that in a area with better ground they are more usable, but the carts that we were provided for the experiments turned the weapons platoons and weapons company into a trail of tears on any movement we tried to conduct during that exercise.   

While assigned as a Instructor at IOC / TBS from 2005 to 2008 we used to do a delay and defend exercise where we would agress the IOC platoons as they conducted a Movement to Contact Exercise. In order to fuck with their OODA loop we would position a M2 crew of 4 dudes on one of the flanks in order to try to get them to reorient in that direction. After a few bursts achieved the chaos we sought, we would pick the whole system up on the tripod and shoulder carry it through the woods. It worked but I probably would not want it to be my first COA..... This was a complete system and roughly 500 link.

Dragged one of those things into position through the swamps of AP Hill IOT conduct an attack on student positions at night as well, same portage method, still not fun.

Best way we found to move one quickly at Infantry Unit Leaders course was dismounted and on top of our rucks, I like the suggestion of purpose set up packs for quick movement, esp. if you are also not carrying rucks already. 

"If you are not prepared to use force to defend civilization, then be prepared to accept barbarism."         - Thomas Sowell

"A Republic, if you can keep it" - Ben Franklin

 

LOCATION: Jacksonville NC

JOINED:  Feb 2012

     

Came back to add that while it should be common knowledge it seems forgotten relatively quickly in my organization that sustaining fire support is a all hands evolution, Meaning that if you go foot mobile with heavy gun crews attached everyone is carrying extra ammo, shits heavy and the  gun crews cannot possibly carry enough to sustain a fight for any amount of time. You want Heavy Gun support then you gotta carry some link to the drop off point, then you got make sure you pick it back up if you move again, rinse, repeat..... 

"If you are not prepared to use force to defend civilization, then be prepared to accept barbarism."         - Thomas Sowell

"A Republic, if you can keep it" - Ben Franklin

 

LOCATION: Jacksonville NC

JOINED:  Feb 2012

     

Re:Skedco

“We tried that once, and quickly had a trashed Skedco full of holes and a very dirty M2: 

Zero out of Five Stars, would not recommend”

Fair enough. They worked ok for mortars on a DZ. I’ve only seen it used on short, level areas with the M2. 

A swing and a miss!

1168 posted:

Re:Skedco

“We tried that once, and quickly had a trashed Skedco full of holes and a very dirty M2: 

Zero out of Five Stars, would not recommend”

Fair enough. They worked ok for mortars on a DZ. I’ve only seen it used on short, level areas with the M2. 

A swing and a miss!

I was in a D Co (Heavy Weapons) and our CO had the bright idea (that clearly hasn't died) that we needed a means of humping a M2/tripod/ammo. We tried the Skedco during a training op and seemed it to be going well over various terrain, including a bit of dirt road with some rocks, until we stopped and checked our load. We were in the middle of congratulating ourselves when we noticed that the receiver and tripod had created "hot spots" that were now huge holes. And with those holes came a shitload of dirt, rocks, and debris. We managed to hastily clean it up, assemble, and fire to complete the mission but it wasn't exactly ideal. 

So I guess it does work, but that Skedco will sleep with Jesus afterwards...

BTW after our proof of concept, the CO never brought it up again (hint-hint)

Not to be a party pooper (too late), but SBF needs a lot of ammo generally, and a box of .50 weighs about 35lbs. Even at 450-550 RPM you'll burn through a bit. So 4 dudes humping kit, personal weapons, a broken down M2 / tripod, and enough ammo to be effective is... problematic. 

PRAISE THE FALLEN

SSG Kevin Roberts KIA 7-May-08         SPC Peter Courcy KIA 10-Feb-09

1Lt Nick Dewhirst KIA 20-July-08          PFC Jason Watson KIA 10-Feb-09

CPL Charles Gaffney KIA 24-Dec-08

 

Joined: 2/21/04          Location: Seattle,  WA

We rented UTVs for the 18 months or so our G Wagons were out of commission. I would bet your RQ has enough contracting experience to dig up 8 of them for the 5 or so monthly exes you will do that require manoeuvre. Our were dropped off at the Armoury 4 to a flat bed trailer and we pulled them with Milcots. You will have to get drivers qualified through MSE Safety but it can be done in weekend. 

CAE5 posted:

I've heard the North Vietnamese transported a lot of loads on bicycles.

They did.  With loads of up to 600 pounds.

Historiana : Case Study : Different perspectives on the Cold War

Still do.

shoobe01 posted:

Took me a bit, but who's old enough to remember their service in the Spanish Civil War or whenever this was issued? 

The Mount, Wheeled, Machine Gun M1. 

A little before my time.

shoobe01 posted:

Naturally, finding M4-anything that is not an AR is impossible with simple googles. Good luck. 

 

Nothing there either as I have to get back to work, but this is fun: 

https://www.forgottenweapons.c...17-machine-gun-cart/

And, comment they were in service at least CONUS into the 60s. 

Go here: 

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=+amm...images&ia=images

The search term was "ammunition cart M4".

And here: 

https://www.lightfighter.net/t...utility-cart-replica

Yes, shameless self-promotion.

shoobe01 posted:

Not bike tires? I'd think the very large diameter and reduced total weight would help. Get the fattest you can though.

One group I worked with used a cart (more like the size of a stretcher cart, with the bike tires but same idea) for a lot of equipment moving. Sorta brilliant, but it has a hard limit to what load it can take over what terrain. DO practice with it, and get used to what that is, and to hooking up other troops to pull; tugging is not horsepower on the wheels, and lots try to drive them like they are driving a car. Not the same thing. 

Removable wheels is nice to stow it, for repair, and just to keep it from rolling away sometimes. 

 I have not seen pictures of bicycle tires on carts.  Too light and easily bent.  

Balloon Designs Pictures: Balloon Bicycle Tires

Fat bike tires, 26" x 2.6", were originally designed to ride on snow.  $40-$150 for the tires alone.  The rims are $100 up.  I like the idea tho.

The advantage of motorcycle tires is that they are rated for highway use and much more solid.  You can design your cart to be towed behind a vehicle.

 

 

 

....

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"It makes no difference what men think of war," said the Judge.  "War endures. As well ask men what they think of stone.  War was always here. Before man was, war waited for him.  The ultimate trade awaiting its ultimate practitioner.  That is the way it was and will be.  That way and not some other way.” Cormac McCarthy, "Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West"

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