I held off as long as I could fighting the 6.5 Creedmore craze that has swept the country for the last 10 years, and finally ended up with one in a trade I couldn't refuse.  A fellow member here put a gun to my head and made me do the deal.........

Anyway, I ended up with a Savage model 10 with a Super Sniper fixed 20 on it. Allegedly this thing has 5R barrel.   I think a Harris swivel-o-matic under the front.

My question is- is Sellier and Bellot brass worth a darn for reloading? They have 140 grain ammo on sale at Sportsman's Whorehouse for dirt cheap and figured I better start stocking up on brass.  This is a whole new caliber for me, and it just won't be right if I don't stockpile a couple thousand rounds.   I have a press ready to go and enough various powders to get a good start, it's just I am a little behind in brass.

 

 

Original Post

If you are going to keep some just in case I would. Have shot some of their ammo and it was okay. I did not reload it. If I’m going to spend the time I want it loaded right.  If you are going to reload precision then I stick with something Hornaday brass. Even that varies by weight some.  It is for that reason I weigh each piece of brass and cull the odd ones. All my precision brass is in batches that are within 1 grain. If you do buy a bunch of S/B weigh each loaded cartridge and group them together, you will have better consistency. Have fun. 

If you haven't already, read through the posts at Sniper's Hide. It can be a little arfcom at times, but there's some excellent reloading info, especially for the 6.5 Creedmore. I will add, S&B is not at the top end of brass from what I've read.

ETA: While I do not reload 6.5, Lapua brass seems to be the go-to brand.

---------------------------------

It's not that life is so short, it's that you're dead for so long.

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

"I was raised in a place called America...
It's gone now, I wish you could've seen it"
- a WWII vet

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

I don’t have any experience with the 6.5 ( I run a 260) or the S&B, but if brass and accuracy are what you’re after alpha or lapua brass are where you should start IMO. If you want to shoot it first prime or hornady in that order for quality. I think S&B could be an ok alternative for when you are taking a buddy shooting that isn’t expecting much other then getting to shoot a cool blaster particularly if it’s gas, or for when you don’t want/care about keeping your brass. I’ve done the whole weight sort, match prep cheap stuff and just don’t feel like it’s worth the time personally to end up with marginal brass that will still loose pockets after 2-3 firings. If it’s a gas gun that beats the brass up, maybe. Anymore I pretty much just go to lapua from the get go and don’t worry about it. 

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Originally Posted by DocGKR:

       
This is why LE in some areas would be better served with belt fed weapons and flame throwers...

       

Joined: 5.23.2009
Location: WA/ Canadian border

Not sure how I missed this thread originally. I've been loading for the 6.5s little, speedier brother for a while, and much the same applies....
Hornady brass has been good to me. Every now and then I have a case that the primer pocket lets go a little early, but that usually only happens in the 6-8 firing range. The overwhelming majority has made it 8-10 before I got bored of tracking it. 
I can't speak to the quality of the S&B 6.5 brass, but given how cheap you can get the (rather excellent) Hornady 140gr factory ammo, that's the route I'd suggest. Not sure how experienced you are on reloading, but realize that a load worked up for the S&B brass may or may not be safe in Hornady - and vice versa.
For reloading, look at H4350 (NOT IMR, etc - only Hodgdon) and Reloder 16. I use H4350, but I will be looking hard at RL16 at the end of this PRS season, as H4350 can be a bit of a pain in the dick to get. You really have to have money sitting in the bank and be ready to jump all over it when you find it locally or can order it online in quantity. IMR 4451 is also supposed to be solid now, but I had an early lot with serious temperature sensitivity problems.
For primers, I have honestly had the best luck with Russian primers - Wolf or Tula (same crap). Just that switch in primers dropped my Standard Deviation (SD) significantly. I can count on two fingers the number of times in the last 2.5 years that I have seen an SD of 10 or higher on my hand loads, and I honestly think the Russian primers are a big part of that. They are also tighter in the primer pockets, giving a little better logevity before the brass is toasted.
If you can't find Russian primers (and good luck with that...), then I'd look at Federal GMM primers or CCI BR primers. From the PRS folks I have asked in the past, it seems to be a tossup between those two if they're not still using a hoard of Tulas.

Finally, one thing to watch for on the Savage - they have a reputation for cutting throats too short in their chambers, which can lead to over-pressure and extraction problems. The 3 I have seen in personal all got fixed by Savage at no charge, but it is definitely something to watch for. All the ones I have seen were far shorter than SAAMI spec, to the point of jamming factory loads well into the lands. Hopefully yours was cut correctly.

William,

I’m a 6.5CM newbie as well.  I can reload but I’m sort of at the point where if really good Hornady  ammo is available and plentiful (and it is), I’m going with it.  I do not compete anywhere so I don’t need to wring every bit of accuracy out of it.  Between my rifle and Hornady ammo, I have banging plates covered for sure and that’s all I do.

For me, If brass is the question, Lapua is the answer but I am sure there are others out there as well.

-------------------------

IT'S A COLT.  THEY'RE LIKE THE HK OF GUNS.

HRH (Ret.) The Most Reverend Consig

Stupidity is not a skillset.

 

 

 

 

 Joined: 28 Nov 2004: 0037hrs        Location: The worst run state in the U.S

Bill, Idaho posted:

Now that you mention it, I have noticed a couple of times with this S&B ammo I had a pretty hard time yanking them out of the chamber. 

I wonder.......

Take a sharpie and blacken the hell out of the projectile - especially the transition from the curved nose of the bullet to the straight shank. GENTLY insert the round directly into the chamber by hand, then close the bolt. Extract the round and carefully catch it. You're trying to avoid rubbing off any of the sharpie ink. If you're jamming the bullet into the lands, you will see it in the sharpie - it will look like little rectangular rub marks with narrow gaps of black ink between them. If the case rotated in the chamber, it'll just look like a solid ring of missing ink. Factory ammo shouldn't be doing that. If you have an OAL gauge like the Hornady one, you can also measure OAL using the gauge and the modified 6.5 Creedmoor case. Once you know the OAL for a given bullet to your rifle's lands, that will give me a good idea of what the chamber looks like.

 

Consigliere posted:

William,

I’m a 6.5CM newbie as well.  I can reload but I’m sort of at the point where if really good Hornady  ammo is available and plentiful (and it is), I’m going with it.  I do not compete anywhere so I don’t need to wring every bit of accuracy out of it.  Between my rifle and Hornady ammo, I have banging plates covered for sure and that’s all I do.

For me, If brass is the question, Lapua is the answer but I am sure there are others out there as well.

Lapua is nice, but expensive. It's also only coming in small rifle primers, which is an annoyance for me since I have piles of large rifle. Personally, I don't see the Lapua brass being worth double the price of the Hornady, especially when you can get once fired Hornady or Prime for 30-40 cents each on places like the Hide.

 

$.02 here.

The Lapua is the best brass hands down; however, with small primers only as mentioned above.  A test done comparing sr to lr primers in 6.5 revealed a little more inconsistency with sr. Not a comprehensive test by any stretch,  but some powders need more ass in the primer to reliably ignite than others. Throw in cold temps and this is magnified. I am using Hornady brass, cci br primers with RL16. My sd's hover around 8. Anytime you can get/stay below 10, it's a winner.  And it's not temp sensitive in the least. Comparatively speaking of course. 

soulezoo posted:

$.02 here.

The Lapua is the best brass hands down; however, with small primers only as mentioned above.  A test done comparing sr to lr primers in 6.5 revealed a little more inconsistency with sr. Not a comprehensive test by any stretch,  but some powders need more ass in the primer to reliably ignite than others. Throw in cold temps and this is magnified. I am using Hornady brass, cci br primers with RL16. My sd's hover around 8. Anytime you can get/stay below 10, it's a winner.  And it's not temp sensitive in the least. Comparatively speaking of course. 

I'm using Hornady brass, Tula LR primers, and H4350 in 6 Creedmoor. With both Berger Hybrids and Hornady ELD-Ms, I routinely get 4-8SDs and ES in the 10-15 range. I also don't gbet nearly as upset about lost brass at matches with Hornady as I would with Lapua. 

rdouglas posted:

One thing I started a few years ago is weighing each case. You get much more consistent groups when the cases all weigh the same. 

What is your goal in terms of group size at 100, though? If you're going for benchrest level consistency (sub-.2MOA) then yeah, it's probably worth it. In my case, I shoot PRS, so it's hard to justify the time and cost of weight/volume sorting brass when I am already getting groups in the .3-.4 range. It's rare for me to see a target where I am wishing my gun was printing in the .1-.2 range at a PRS event.

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