Bryson, no problem. I don't know if the pockets were made specifically for the 60mm rounds or not but it was a perfect fit. On a side note, those low density personnel were always exempt from SQD/PLT equipment or ammo since their loads were considerably more than the standard shooter.

As for the water treatment, whether iodine, UV, or alien ray guns, to be 100% sure you really need some physical filtration. Were we taking (slight) chance? Probably, but never had one single incident, and that's what was issued-so that's what we took. And as I mentioned before it worked better (for me personally) than the bleach treatments used in hooah school.
It probably helped that you were using "cleaner", moving water sources and not standing water or wells, so we're not really comparing apples to apples. Vet Medic, I think you made the right call to use filters in your case. Filters aren't going to be appropriate if you can't afford to stay at/near your water source and pump a Miniworks filter though.

Has anyone used the gravity-fed filter systems? Seems like you could fill up your dirty water bag, bring it with you to your patrol base, and have it running while you tend to your other work.

 

Know what you know; Know what you don't know. -Paul Petzoldt

I haven't been back to Benning in probably five years, but last I knew it had closed down. Probably just as well, I'm a little too old (and married) for the same kind of shenanigans that were the norm there back in the 90s. Interesting place indeed.
Krax, I've used the Platypus gravity fed filtration system extensively. See it here. It allows me to filter 4L of water in the space of about 2 minutes. It worked extremely well. Combine that with a MIOX or something equivalent and I think you've got a very workable system.

The only drawback I've found with these is if you aren't careful you can burst the bladder.

Common sense: so goddam rare, it should be a super power.

Ian, have you used it in a work environment? Would you say that the water reservoirs in the Platypus system are more likely to burst than other hydration reservoirs?

This dude pieced together his own. Try to ignore the lisp: DIY Gravity Filter

 

Know what you know; Know what you don't know. -Paul Petzoldt

Yeah I used them for about a month of continuous training up at the Mountain Warfare Training Center. Out of 4 that we had in my platoon, one burst, and one had problems with the valve. Out of my company there were 4 that burst. With a reasonable amount of care taken, they were sturdy enough. You just couldn't beat the shit out of them.

I wouldn't say that they are any more likely to burst than any others, but to my not-so-well-calibrated eyeball, they didnt feel as durable. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend them.

Common sense: so goddam rare, it should be a super power.

Some random thoughts after reading through this thread:
Just reconfigured a Bug-setup. Have a half full ILBE. And natural instinct was "What am I missing".
Needless to say I acquired a lot of gear when I was in the Corps that never found its way back to supply. But the end state of my bug back is simple: Survive, Live.
Some food, Camelbak Clear, and a Katadyn hiker pump are my water our. Yes I still have iodine tab's kicking around. Ammo, some food....

I think back to Marjah 2010. 200 rounds of 50 cal ammo, on top of my personal load out (USMC 03 in a CAAT platoon-dismounted). M4, 203, it adds up. My medium ruck was full of 50 cal ammo and 40mm, and a pair of socks, and a ranger roll. Slept in a hole for a couple days in cold weather, and got close with my team. Survived. But walking was pain in ass.

Reading through this thread proves the point; a bivvy and poncho go along way, with a change of night clothes. Goretex is light and warm. Staying dry IS warm. A beanie is lightweight and
also keeps you warm.
I Think back to my company packing list's and gear inspections - spare pairs of boots that simply got fucked-up creases in them because thy were pushed into your pack with a foot. 2 sets of spare cammies. Thousand pairs of socks.
In combat it was ammo, water, 2 stripped mre's, a extra pair of socks, and a frog warm layer. Yeap, feet got wet in the canals and it was very cold nights.
My 15 man section carried 2 50's , 240, and jav that cold February night. Needless to say ,the 2 KM's we moved was fucking painful.

Go figure, we went to MCMWTC after the deployment, and learned how to live light and fight light.

Oh, and update: Fuck the ILBE. Back to medium alice.

 

I'm re-reading Nick Vaux's Take That Hill and he makes mention that while shaping the assault on Mt Harriet, 42 Commando finally received it's "large" packs (pg. 151 in the softcover edition). Earlier though, on pg. 136, he mentions use of a Norwegian patrol pack, in lieu of the issued patrol pack.

Throughout the chapters after the San Carlos landings, Vaux makes reference to using sleeping bags, but if they weren't carried in the larger bergens, does anyone know how they were carried?

The Falklands War would be the only modern fight where I could see the maxim of "better to have it and not need it" holding true for a dismounted fight. Even then I don't think it warrants a dogmatic insistence on general issue of large rucks across the force. Put another way, if the USMC had to make that landing in 1982, it would have gone in with medium ALICE most likely, and maybe large ALICE.

Question for the group...Would the Corps have been dramatically unprepared for that landing with a medium ALICE?

The medium runs 2,350 cu. inches and the large, 3,800.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

Sir,

I remember moving our sustainment load out to the tracks before we crossed the border in 2003, We had people falling out on that little 600 m movement, Made an impression on me because every conditioning hump or range movement I'd been on prior to that(stationed in the stumps ATT) was always with the full MOLLE system with almost all of the CIF issue stuffed into it, supposedly to make weight, I do not ever recall being told or taught only to bring what was needed or being allowed to deviate from the packing list, which was everything.

Obviously I've been through the entire run of USMC packs in the last decade plus bought some of my own, At first it seemed like larger was the way to go, but if you have to carry that thing you are not going very far, recently I've been using a SPEC OPS enhanced ruck (same size as a ALICE MED with MOLLE on the sides and quick release buckles)in CB mounted to a surplus ALICE frame, If it cannot fit in this size of pack for a three to 5 day OP then it does not need to go. I think this is the perfect size of pack for what we do in the Infantry.

Obviously those with different mission sets will require different tools but part of the problem is I do not think that anyone actually trusts our Loggies to be able to do their jobs. In a landing or initial push type situation you are not going to need all those layers all the time, your going to be at at least 50 percent in your defensive positions and while on the move, who needs a bag. When I worked at TBS supporting the IOC classes we would have the LT's at AP hill in JAN hot bagging, It lightened the load and enabled people to be able to move quickly on the flanks during sweeps, move other supplies and also be able to switch out the load so that not anyone person became too fatigued. If the operation is properly planned out then after securing the objective, those sustainment packs can be brought in either by the CO gunny, or sling loaded or convoyed in, were going to be bringing in supplies anyway right,

Once it's time to leave or move we get all that stuff picked back up or lifted out.

I think the Idea of having large nestable packs and thinking that the troops are going to be able to move all that stuff all the time is unrealistic, All of these current huge packs we have are just FOB suitcases and honestly make it even harder to plan for the MEU missions that we are supposed to be able to support.

Just one more example before I get off my soapbox - During the 2009 13th MEU CERTEX my company was tasked to conduct a NEO at the dock facility at SEAL beach NWS, We were the designated boat/truck company (not sure exactly how you are a boat company with out zodiac's but that's a different rant) We were loaded up in our LCU and pulled into the port facility, Intel had failed us again as there was a large ship docked directly in front of the ramp we were supposed to put in at so after circling around for a while we pulled up next to the pier an the sailors moored us in.

Here's the problem, this was supposed to be a 4 hour operation, Fighting load, 1 emergency chow, Camelback , and perhaps a light warming layer right? Wrong, people were worried about contingencies, getting left on the beach being hungry, running out of water, being cold at night, so for a four hour mission our guys ended up taking their main packs ashore with warming layers, 3 day DOS, full sleeping systems, breach kits, all sorts of things, we were turtled unable to move, much less climb out of the LCU and up onto the dock to set up security.

In the end I think that the MED Alice is the perfect size for what we do, and that trusting and training with our logistical support elements to bring in timely support will cover all of those longer durations.

If the SQD leaders, Plt Sgts, Co guns, and Bn Staff's trained to do these things I think it would help out a lot, It could be integrated into the end of PLT attack ranges, Consolidation on the objective perhaps, instead we just endex at that point

"If you are not prepared to use force to defend civilization, then be prepared to accept barbarism."         - Thomas Sowell

"A Republic, if you can keep it" - Ben Franklin

 

LOCATION: Jacksonville NC

JOINED:  Feb 2012

     

Just thought about it on my way to DFAC 5 here on LNK for the morning eggs -If you are still in the Camp Pendleton area go down to Ares Armor and ask to take a look at the prototype pack they made that nests with their combat pack, Its a Med ALICE size that mounts on the ALICE frame, I don't think they have ever offered it on their website though. I think that that would be about perfect for what the regular infantry would need.

"If you are not prepared to use force to defend civilization, then be prepared to accept barbarism."         - Thomas Sowell

"A Republic, if you can keep it" - Ben Franklin

 

LOCATION: Jacksonville NC

JOINED:  Feb 2012

     

All excellent points above. Vaux's account reminds me of the fallacy of strapping a standardized load on our backs, walking 25 miles on unimproved roads and calling it a day. The Royal Marines didn't have many roads to move over. It was usually sopping wet, marsh-like ground, strewn with boulders and crags, and they typically moved at night.

You guys who've had to move in NE AFG know the work involved. The planning factors we have thrown out there for years in CONUS training tend to leave a lot to be desired compared to how it will actually go down.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

quote:
Originally posted by senorlechero:
rcb: does the spec ops recon ruck have a storm collar?

Another plus to the medium ALICE is that you attach the MSS carrier from the MOLLE pack easily, and they're cheap.


It does not - but as usual they are relatively easy to have sewn in, It does seem to have more material in the drawstring area than the normal ALICE packs though.

"If you are not prepared to use force to defend civilization, then be prepared to accept barbarism."         - Thomas Sowell

"A Republic, if you can keep it" - Ben Franklin

 

LOCATION: Jacksonville NC

JOINED:  Feb 2012

     

quote:
Originally posted by senorlechero:
Good to know, I'll be sending my medium ALICE to TT then.

How many channels of MOLLE are on the sides? And are you running any pouches for mission essentials there?


4 across and 4 rows high at the bottom, then shifts to 3 at the top, I don't normally have things mounted to the sides but, have put some of the issued canteen pouches on there before, plenty of room to attach med or large utility pouches if you needed the extra space, Top flap has molle on it as well If you wanted to attach a pouch and use it like a claymore pocket. as well as the bottom if you wanted to attach something there as well, But at that point you would be back to the same issue as before, too much space and the weight that goes with it.

"If you are not prepared to use force to defend civilization, then be prepared to accept barbarism."         - Thomas Sowell

"A Republic, if you can keep it" - Ben Franklin

 

LOCATION: Jacksonville NC

JOINED:  Feb 2012

     

I finally found the time to rally my full 72-hr gear list together and load it up in a SOURCE "Double D" 45L that I've had for some time in prototype and production form. I'm still wrapping my review of the pack, but I'm more convinced than ever that 45L capacity, with a beavertail, is all that an infantry rifleman needs for a three day op across the temperate climate zone. With tweaks, the loadout should suffice for slight dips into slightly colder and warmer temps. Configuration changes should allow emma gees, mortarmen, and assaultman to be similarly prepared.

Something with greater capacity becomes an invitation for METT-TS&L abuse and ignorance.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

It's definitely on the way. It was overcast enough today to get a few good photos. I just need a couple highlighting how the packs integrates with armor, and I'll post it up in the format 22F has used for so many great reviews.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

quote:
Originally posted by jcustisredux:
I'm re-reading Nick Vaux's Take That Hill and he makes mention that while shaping the assault on Mt Harriet, 42 Commando finally received it's "large" packs (pg. 151 in the softcover edition). Earlier though, on pg. 136, he mentions use of a Norwegian patrol pack, in lieu of the issued patrol pack.

Throughout the chapters after the San Carlos landings, Vaux makes reference to using sleeping bags, but if they weren't carried in the larger bergens, does anyone know how they were carried?

The Falklands War would be the only modern fight where I could see the maxim of "better to have it and not need it" holding true for a dismounted fight. Even then I don't think it warrants a dogmatic insistence on general issue of large rucks across the force. Put another way, if the USMC had to make that landing in 1982, it would have gone in with medium ALICE most likely, and maybe large ALICE.

Question for the group...Would the Corps have been dramatically unprepared for that landing with a medium ALICE?

The medium runs 2,350 cu. inches and the large, 3,800.


I've done about as much scouring of the 'net and printed sources I could find, and I still haven't found satisfactory answers to the questions I tried to answer above.

Does anyone have a line on an approach to take to make comms with a member of 40, 42, 45 Commando, or 2 Para, 3 Para who made the foot movement to Stanley?

Right now the Falklands is the only conflict I been able to think of where the terrain, Wx, and limited logistics might make the case for general issue of 60L+ rucks, but some of what I have read suggests that marches with full loadouts were not always successful and most times the troops did not have their large bergens with them anyway. I'm trying to confirm/deny this sort of info and get more granularity on what happened.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

I used to work with a bunch of ex 2 Para dudes, myself being from 4 Para - from memory, much of what they marched with was ordnance for mortars, machine gun ammo and grenades.

Pers kit wasn't the highest priority.

-------------------------------- Freedom - Isn't Free My only worry about death is that my wife will sell my gear for what I SAID I paid for it..... My greatest worry about life - is that she'll find out what I did pay for it.....

quote:
Originally posted by jcustisredux:
I'm re-reading Nick Vaux's Take That Hill and he makes mention that while shaping the assault on Mt Harriet, 42 Commando finally received it's "large" packs (pg. 151 in the softcover edition). Earlier though, on pg. 136, he mentions use of a Norwegian patrol pack, in lieu of the issued patrol pack.o

Throughout the chapters after the San Carlos landings, Vaux makes reference to using sleeping bags, but if they weren't carried in the larger bergens, does anyone know how they were carried?



The main pack in use by the British Infantry in 1982 was the '58 Pattern Large Pack. The pack was designated 'large', but in reality had the capacity of a modern day assault pack. SOP at the time was for the sleeping bag (which was duck down) to be placed in a black rubbish bag and strapped to the lid of the large pack. This was very unwieldy and often lead to sleeping bags being brought forward by transport after the foot move had occurred.

When the decision was made to send the task force south, a rapid acquisition was made of civilian packs, primarily the Berghaus Cyclops Roc pack. This pack was state of the art at the time and already had a niche following within the Royal Marines. So many were required for the task force that Berghaus ran out of olive green packs and some task force members deployed with blue colour packs.

Other issue packs in use at the time were the Artic Bergen (another pack where the sleeping bag was stored externally), the SAS / Para Bergen and the GS Bergen. All were butyl nylon, with external steel frames. The SAS / Para Bergen and the GS Bergen used the same frame as was used to carry the Clansman series of radios.

I'm sure your research / reading has mentioned it, but the movement of packs during the Falklands War was achieved by a number of means, including helicopter, BV206 and at one point, commandeering a farmer's tractor and trailer.

If you want to talk to a Royal Marine veteran from the war, or want some more detailed material, the Royal Marines Museum may be able to help you out.

www.royalmarinesmuseum.co.uk

The museum shop also sells a book called 'The Yompers', written by a bloke who was with 45 Cdo during the war.
That's great information. I'm going to check on that book, as well as the museum.

Thank you.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

Mac,

 

Good thing you resurrected this.  In the time since I posted that line of questions, the light bulb went on and I smartened up to remember that the Marine Corps of 1982 would have fought the Falklands totally different than the Brits did, and would have relied heavily on Assault Amphibious Vehicles, as well as gone heavy with jeeps for a variety of uses, including heavy CSW employment.  

 

Having BVS and Scimitars as the only tracked platforms that were loaded in the holds of the ships impacted ground mobility a ton, and makes a case for a platform that can scoot in/out of a ship under its own power and then maneuver inland once ashore.  IIRC, the Brit logisticians had a hell of a time trying to get the right stores out of ships and ashore, especially when juxtaposed against the need to move dismounted personnel places as well.

 

USMC planners would have also likely scoured the country for every Lrg ALICE pack and pushed them to the task force as it prepped to head southwest.  That, or the unit commanders would have requested them.  That kinda also makes the case to just use an "expedition" sized pack during training and ops, instead of switching out at the last minute due to changing circumstances

 

If we took away AAVs, and only had medium ALICE, we would have still relied heavily on M151 jeeps and trailers to haul components of existence loads around.  Marines would have likely rolled extra warming layers in with their green slug sleeping bags, then into the waterproof bags.  Those would have probably been moved around the same way the Brits did, and not with the infantryman's carried load because extra ammo, food, and water would have required a place in the pack while tripods, mortar rounds, etc. would have been strapped on the top where sleeping bags normally rode.

 

It would have still been a big juggling act if AAVs were not available, and the M151s would have been overstretched. Extra quantities of ammunition have to move somehow.  We would have prosecuted the fight in pretty much the same way as it played out, even at the individual level.  Since we don't have quite the same universal experiences in coping with crappy weather, I think we would have fought a little more slowly, but with the same final result.

 

From points made about additional carried ordnance and equipment, I need to amend my 72-hr load description made earlier:

 

This still leaves room for a mission-essential item like 100 rds of belted ammo, an APERS mine, biometric or surveillance device, BA5590 battery, 60mm mortar round, or C2 tool.

 

We need packs that can also carry a tripod, rocket (LAW or AT4 type), and mortar ammunition, and do it well since those items are the most taxing if they become dynamic loads 

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

I can't recall if I've read that Scots Guards AAR. Is it online in an elecctronic format?
I too have had to scour a lot of sources to pick up snippets on how the Falklands went down.

As for planning being the domain of higher level folks, that's clearly part of the problem and reason why we continue to fail at remembering history.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

Yeah, that's not working and basic poking at it in case of typos isn't working. Are you hosting it at your dropbox account or did you find it somewhere else? 

 

Found this while trying to search for it. May be interesting: 

 

Reassessing the Fighting Performance of Conscript  Soldiers during the Malvinas/Falklands War (1982)(*)
  Alejandro L. Corbacho
  Department of Political Science
  Universidad del CEMA, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.ucema.edu.ar/public...d/documentos/271.pdf

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Both your link to the source website and this link I pulled from it work for me:  

http://dl.dropboxusercontent.c...0of%20Tumbledown.pdf

Edit: Sorry, that's broken now because Dropbox couldn't leave well enough alone. Now copied it to here: 

http://centralwar.com/download...0of%20Tumbledown.pdf

 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Those links to the AAR remind me that I have pretty much done a shit job at finding ways to ensure my past units' histories are similarly documented.  A a case in point, there are several Marine Corps history publications that recount the first engagements before we crossed the berm into Iraq in 2003, and they are all 180 degrees out from what really happened.  Someone tried to piece together what went down by sifting through yellow canary message pads.  It's only been recently that oral histories have been documenting what has happened, but they are at best relegated to company and platoon commander level.

 

We have terabyte upon terabyte of data sitting on servers at Leatherneck, in CIDNE, CPOF, etc., and it will never be mined properly.  Even the battalion command chronologies are typically full of such half-cocked, get-it-done-now-and-turn-it-in writing that they cannot capture what really happens at the company and platoon levels.

 

To some degree, instead of focusing so much on getting Johnny and Joe a resource to read books for their kids either Skyping or making a CD, we also need to invest in recording the oral history as soon after the fight as possible, and finding some way to be smarter about the classification process so the lessons and history can be more portable, fluid, and relevant.

 

 I'm thinking sort of like an AAR, but with a mix of reality show  "confession" room thrown in, because even when a unit conducts a debrief/hotwash, there is a lot being lost.  It takes everyone going  through what happened, from their viewpoint, to get a true sense of how things unfolded.  The recent online release of "For the 25" is one example of what I'm thinking about, and is probably the first time that some of those guys have had the chance to piece together how their tour went.

 

We shouldn't have to rely on helmet cam footage and the window of time when the next Logan Stark gets into a professional writing program for this stuff to happen.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

...we also need to invest in recording the oral history as soon after the fight as possible, and finding some way to be smarter about the classification process so the lessons and history can be more portable, fluid, and relevant.

At the dawn of the modern Internet era, there were some promising moves in all sorts of domains, even the military, to do this. Then... Well, I don't know. There was for example a very cool project that interviewed a few hundred people (mostly small unit commanders no less, and which included logistics guys and foreign units) from the 1990/91 Gulf War which:

1) Was mostly not completed. Indexed, but 90% not transcribed and the audio recordings weren't posted.

2) I can't even find now. So, that seems to have just died. 

 

And much the same happened elsewhere. Sites are dead, or moribund. Collections with good info, no less. I think we decided that this is a lot of work and we'd rather just auto-save Facebook posts and stuff like that. 

 

If security concerns could be solved, it would be really, really cool to simply record every bit of tactical radio (and the position data, text messaging, video feeds, etc.) shared over all networks, and then at least it would be recorded accurately instead of being recollections. But good luck with getting that built and funded. We don't pay for enough transport assets, or preserve core competency in any other fields. We clearly do not believe in leaning our lessons and spreading proven knowledge, in general. OTOH, long live LF.net! 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Because I like resurrecting old posts, can anyone link or post a link to the Scots Gaurds AAR pdf

____________________________"Train for Peace, not war it is safer" Canadian Forces Light "You are on your way to visit death and destruction upon a village full of mouth breathers who would rather fuck their buddy than their uneducated toothless wife and who's most glorious moment in thier worthless lives is when they dance three circles around a meteorite and then cast stones at an imaginary devil. Ahhh, the simple pleasures", To quote GG

Boy that one I cannot find online yet. Saved a copy years ago (as this happens, so now am paranoid), so just posted to our website for you all to have: 

http://centralwar.com/download...0of%20Tumbledown.pdf

 

As an example of things disappearing, still cannot find that Gulf War oral history project. Just a super, super lame one from Frontline where they interview the big commanders and a few obscure little guys whose story has never been told like Andy McNab 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

This forum is unique in that individual foot soldiers can post their own personal, un-filtered experiences.

Official sites like the Army Center for Lessons Learned and the old Infantry forums were designed and filtered to reflect party line and doctrine.  Instead of empowering Joes, Joe just went back to doing and wearing/carrying what mainstream Army told them was good for them.

Asymmetric Warfare Group has had potential to do good things as TRADOC's "Napoleon's Corporal," but the Army is slow and ponderous, and bureaucratic inertia may as well be a physical law.

I don't believe Ranger battalions still do cyclical training to jungles since middle east / Horn of Africa / Maghreb combat has been deserts.  Maybe arid mountains because of Afghanistan.

Three-day combat loads are no longer doctrinally pushed since hard armor plates and  (unofficial) adoption of MRAPs for troops (in-theater) without Strykers or Brads.

Old-fashioned foot soldier yomping/humping/tabbing was forced on the Falkland Commandos and Paras.  Smaller national forces require improvising. 

Large expeditions (Afghanistan) in land-locked areas where we don't have over-flight or overland transit rights complicate logistics due to politics.

Our wonderful second- and third-line gear forums here reflect thought in how we try getting the monkey off the football, re-configuring what's available and what's possible within the physical limits of a 135- to 165-pound Soldier moving over hills, dales, mountains, swamps, rivers, and streams anywhere on the planet with arms and malice in our hearts.

The 3-Day Pack should have replaced the WW1/WWII haversack and supply trains, but as mentioned in this thread and others we put more into a Soldier's load expecting him to move faster, farther, longer, and fight harder with a heavier load both weight- and heat-wise.

 

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