Sage Dynamics RDS Handgun Instructor

Muncie Indiana May 21-23 2019

 

Gear:

STI Tactical 4.0 HOST 9mm

STI 20 round magazines

Longs Shadow Crestone 2 holster

Trijicon RMR 06 gen 2

Federal AE 147gr training ammo and Federal HST 147gr

Duty belt (Bianchi nothing fancy)

 

Training/Experience

LE 17 years

One of Department FI’s

I have been using a Trijicon RMR on duty since 2015

-First G1 RMR07 on a G3 Glock 22C using a RCS Balor

-Second G2 RMR07 on G4 Glock 17 using a RCS Balor

-November 2018 switched to G2 RMR06 on STI Tactical 4.0 HOST

-Attended Modern Samurai red dot 2 day class

-Have attended numerous other trainings where the red dot was not the focus of the class

 

Class/Misc.

Started with 20 students. Mostly Indiana LE with at least one fed. I didn’t come with them, but there were three of us from Illinois.

Prior to this class I had my RMR zeroed at 10 yards. Last Saturday I switched to a 25 yard zero because I knew SD advocated that. I had no problems with zero the entire class. We shot from 3 yards to 25 yards during the class.

Round count: 823 Federal AE 147gr and 50 Federal HST 147gr. (Final Qualification)

 

TD1

Training day 1 was held at the MTAC facility in Muncie Indiana. This day was all classroom with PowerPoint and discussion. It was not a death by PowerPoint and we had some good discussions. I don’t want to sound like a dick or an expert, but if I would have missed this training day I would not have been lost. Like many here I have read everything put out by Sage Dynamics and watched almost all of his YouTube videos. Most of what he has said I had already heard from him, Modern Samurai, and Tactically Sound Training Center.

 

With that being said I am glad it was part of this class. TD1 was a short day and I was able to get a few things at Wal-Mart before getting a good dinner. I also do not sleep to well when I stay at Hotels. I was able to catch a short nap.

 

TD2

Training day 2 started with a steady rain. I had already treated my optics the night before because I looked at the weather forecast. Temperature was in the low 70’s so it wasn’t bad. I have been using RainX to treat my optics lately. I have Cat Crap and have used it successfully for some time. I don’t find it hard to order it, but I wanted to find something that anyone can easily get. RainX is available at the dozen or so gas stations in my jurisdiction, Wal-Mart, Rural King, and a few other places. I wanted to find something that any Patrol Officer could purchase on shift if needed.

 

Because I treated my optic I had no problems with the rain and I do not recall any of the other students having problems. SD brought one of his Agency Glock 17’s with the Aimpoint ACRO mounted to it. The closed emitter on the ACRO is not affected by rain like the other MRDS’s. I have an ACRO arriving Tuesday and I am sure I will like it, but the RMR is in my opinion the best option for duty use currently. I have firsthand experience with the RMR’s durability and have read others experience with the RMR. Once others start getting higher round counts on the ACRO my opinion will probably change.

 

Topics of TD2

Proper grip

Proper draw

Diagnosing grip efficiency with DOT behavior

Recovery of DOT in recoil

Building competency under stress

 

Topics of TD3

Strong hand and weak hand shooting

Close contact shooting

Occluded optic shooting

Pistol malfunctions

Qualification

 

Most of TD3 was spent moving up and down the range from the 3 yard line to the 25 yard line.

 

This class was geared towards firearm instructors that will have to teach MRDS to new Officers or current Officers who either adopt a MRDS or are mandated to carry them. I believe most of the students were current FI’s. I also believe that MRDS’s will continue to be adopted. Portions of the FBI, CBP, and the US Marshals are in the process of adopting MRDS’s. Houston PD is probably the largest municipal PD to allow MRDS’s.

 

The last portion of TD3 was the qualification. The qualification did a good job of covering portions of everything that was taught. The qualification consisted of 50 rounds and went from 3 yards to 25 yards. I used duty ammunition to complete the qualification. A USPSA style cardboard target was used. The head and established A zone were clearly defined. The B zone was clearly defined. Out of the 50 rounds, a minimum of 40 rounds had to be within the B zone. If all rounds were in the A zone you would master the qualification. The second class for scoring allowed you to have all but 4 rounds within the A and B zones.  

 

Half of the class made this second class. I had 5 out and missed earning patch by 1 round. When I was firing my last round I knew I shanked it. The shooter to my left was showering me with HOT brass during the two days of training. Most of the time it just annoyed me, but wasn’t a big problem. However that last piece of brass flew the right way and down my neck and into my shirt causing me to shank the last round I fired. It sucks, but in reality I should have fired the other 49 rounds better so I will get over the butthurt.

 

When this class comes back to Indiana or another venue close I will defiantly be back. Not only to become better myself and crush the qualification, but to continue my education in instructing. This class was paid %100 by me. The class tuition, ammunition, pistol and magazines, lodging and food, gas, and a couple days of vacation. I don’t say that to brag or garner sympathy. I say this because if I didn’t find value in the class I would have left requesting a refund. This class was not a beginner’s class for MRDS optics and their use. You should have some time behind them before attending and be proficient.

 

I don’t think Aaron Cowan said this to blow smoke up our skirts. I think he was truly honest. Aaron Cowan stated that as a whole this class was comprised of solid shooters. We progressed through the material fast and did so at all distances. I saw the other student’s targets and I agree.

 

When MRDS’s are discussed on Facebook/IG/Twitter, etc. there always seems to be a couple people who say they think they are cool, but would never use one for duty. They also always mention fogging of the optic and mud blocking the emitter as reasons why they would not use a MRDS for any serious purpose. We have already addressed treating the optic with Cat Crap or RainX to prevent most problems with fogging optics. One student had an issue I had never seen before.

 

The berm we were shooting at had been rained on for a couple days. Occasionally a piece of mud would fly back towards shooters on the line. One piece of mud flew back and landed on the emitter of a student’s gun. Not a highly likely issue in my opinion, but one you should consider.

LPD "People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. . . The leader works in the open, and the boss in covert. The leader leads, and the boss drives." - Theodore Roosevelt

Original Post

On your description of the USPSA target used for the qual course --  the "B" zone on that target is the outer part of the head. Were you shooting all head shots?

**********************

arm yourself, because no one else here will save you . . .

 

he found faith in danger, a lifestyle he lived by

 

Assemble the Kingsmen

It’s hard to explain. I should have taken a picture of my target, but I didn’t. Basically from the shoulders up was considered an A zone. There were “Head” shots required in the course of fire as well. A small area from the neck to the A zone was considered a B. Approximately an inch. Basically everything in the A was the best you could do. Everything in the B and A was the second best. I had 45 shots within the A and B zone. I had 5 shots outside the B zone. You needed 40 shots within the B zone or A zone to pass. I passed but I was 1 shot away from the second tier. Again not complaining as I had 49 other shots I should have shot better on. I was happy with my shooting, but I still have room for improvement 

LPD "People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. . . The leader works in the open, and the boss in covert. The leader leads, and the boss drives." - Theodore Roosevelt

lpd5408 posted:

It’s hard to explain. I should have taken a picture of my target, but I didn’t. Basically from the shoulders up was considered an A zone. There were “Head” shots required in the course of fire as well. A small area from the neck to the A zone was considered a B. Approximately an inch. Basically everything in the A was the best you could do. Everything in the B and A was the second best. I had 45 shots within the A and B zone. I had 5 shots outside the B zone. You needed 40 shots within the B zone or A zone to pass. I passed but I was 1 shot away from the second tier. Again not complaining as I had 49 other shots I should have shot better on. I was happy with my shooting, but I still have room for improvement 

Thank you for taking the time to write this up. Are you applying rain x the same way as cat crap? Would love to have you up to Minneapolis in September if you're looking to go again!

In Valor There Is Hope

I think Cat Crap is a better product. I prefer the paste. I apply both the same way, with a Q tip to both sides of the optic window. The side I see and the Target/bad guy side. I’m doing this weekly unless weather dictates I do it more often. That’s just work guns/optics so it’s not a huge time burden. Range guns and test guns get it whenever. 

We experienced rain and in the low 70’s to sunny sauna weather later in the day. I had no issues with water dots of fogging. Come to think of it I experienced no problems with gear or ammunition. You might pay a little more here and there, but having good gear at the start definitely helps learning.

SCSU74 I discussed this a little bit on another medium. This course was not a learn to shoot a MRDS equipped pistol. It was assumed that the students had some familiarity before class started. 

Some drills were done at the beginning to establish a course base line. That progressed quickly because almost everyone was shooting good.

This was more of a Teach the Teacher or Train the Trainers class. How to read the students we will have in the future and how to get them spun up easier and with less ammunition and time. It was discussed early that time and ammunition will still be something to contend with in LE even if MRDS’s are adopted. 

Some of the stuff I learned by forced learning may not work on the Department time and dime. 

Policy and SOP was also discussed and I’m working on a few things in that regard with my PD. As an example in your Department qual is there a string or two of fire where the RDS has to be turned off and iron BUIS’s used? It doesn’t have to be an entire qual that way just a string or two. 

Obviously techniques like the guillotine method or ghost ring method will have to be discussed prior.

Another nugget. Do you have trouble finding the dot? This question is for everyone. It’s so simple even a caveman can do it. On a Glock think back plate to nose. On any other pistol rear plate or hammer to nose. Not actually touching the nose. As the back plate hammer etc comes into view the dot will always be in the same place.

It goes back to your hand eye coordination  

LPD "People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. . . The leader works in the open, and the boss in covert. The leader leads, and the boss drives." - Theodore Roosevelt

lpd5408 posted:

I think Cat Crap is a better product. I prefer the paste. I apply both the same way, with a Q tip to both sides of the optic window. The side I see and the Target/bad guy side. I’m doing this weekly unless weather dictates I do it more often. That’s just work guns/optics so it’s not a huge time burden. Range guns and test guns get it whenever. 

We experienced rain and in the low 70’s to sunny sauna weather later in the day. I had no issues with water dots of fogging. Come to think of it I experienced no problems with gear or ammunition. You might pay a little more here and there, but having good gear at the start definitely helps learning.

SCSU74 I discussed this a little bit on another medium. This course was not a learn to shoot a MRDS equipped pistol. It was assumed that the students had some familiarity before class started. 

Some drills were done at the beginning to establish a course base line. That progressed quickly because almost everyone was shooting good.

This was more of a Teach the Teacher or Train the Trainers class. How to read the students we will have in the future and how to get them spun up easier and with less ammunition and time. It was discussed early that time and ammunition will still be something to contend with in LE even if MRDS’s are adopted. 

Some of the stuff I learned by forced learning may not work on the Department time and dime. 

Policy and SOP was also discussed and I’m working on a few things in that regard with my PD. As an example in your Department qual is there a string or two of fire where the RDS has to be turned off and iron BUIS’s used? It doesn’t have to be an entire qual that way just a string or two. 

Obviously techniques like the guillotine method or ghost ring method will have to be discussed prior.

Another nugget. Do you have trouble finding the dot? This question is for everyone. It’s so simple even a caveman can do it. On a Glock think back plate to nose. On any other pistol rear plate or hammer to nose. Not actually touching the nose. As the back plate hammer etc comes into view the dot will always be in the same place.

It goes back to your hand eye coordination  

I forgot where he mentioned the back plate trick (probably a youtube video), but it's helped me quite a bit. That in addition to recognizing I was hunching my shoulders on presentation I'm able to acquire the dot on presentation almost every draw.

May not have been clear in last post, but we're hosting him in September. You mentioned wanting to attend again if close by, thought I'd throw it out there.

In Valor There Is Hope

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