Today did a shooting/moving event where my midlength 16" got really muddy, and a couple times it was partly or entirely immersed in streams. Cold range so during movement not even a mag, so a lot more chance than usual to get crap in the gun.*

None of the immersion caused issues (even to electronics...) but I had some time after them before shooting, so made sure to lock the action open so any water that got in would drain. 

But now I'm home and the soft goods are hosed off, getting to the hard goods. Was doing a light cleaning of the outside, got the optics cleaned up, then noticed the stock was really gritty so pulled and hosed that off then... it got to me getting the whole thing apart and remembering: immersed. Oh yeah. Water droplets in the non-contact areas of the upper receiver and BC. 

So, aside from making sure I get the sandy dirt out, is there anything special to do after immersion? Do I, for a change, run the bore? 

 

I know it's not wood and steel, so /shouldn't/ corrode, but do tell if immersion in freshwater suggests a full detail strip of the bolt at least, or any other special procedures. 

 

And:

  • Since I can find like nothing on this so far, feel free to share your knowledge on saltwater procedures as well. Always interesting to learn more. 
  • If you know/suspect immersion is likely before stepping off, what's the current preventative measure if anything? Last I saw general issue waterproof bags was just post Vietnam, and I am not sure a muzzle cover would help or hurt. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Original Post

I'm eager to hear the advice here as well.  Also, Shoobe, please do a thread focused on the run-n-gun, as it sounds intriguing.  Other than dump a crapload of oil in/on it.

Seems like some kind of magazine well plug with a muzzle cap, would be a good thing, if rules allowed them.  

https://www.brownells.com/shoo...-plug-prod41921.aspx

Tankersteve

In Yorktown, VA.          Joined August 2008

Gov't Civilian, after retiring from active duty in 2015. 

 

'One's own open sore never smells.'  - Haitian proverb

Too. Tired. 

Little posted in the DG16 thread. Will make a note to post something tomorrow in the competition thread for everyone. 

I did not have a very good idea AT ALL going in what I'd be encountering, so had no prep or thought. Pretty sure they'd hate the magwell plug as it's a Thing: in the Magwell. But, an interesting thought indeed generally. Unloaded on ATVs, etc. 

 

For more fun: I had a pretty solid stoppage on the first course of fire, about 7 rounds in. Had to mortar the gun to get it clear, and THAT knocked my damned stock loose. Hand tightened to get it straight, no problems for the rest of the day, but 

Anyway: after initial clearance I left the gun locked open for the first 3/4 mile of muddy, splashy movement. I am SURE I had like a piece of sand in the mechanism there, kicked up from that fucking around and my stupidity leaving the gun locked open. I did feel for and close the cover, just not the bolt! 

(Trying not to agonize over: first stoppage on this gun ever. Ever. Lots of rounds, in blowing talc dust, at classes, probably over a thousand just blanks with BFA, upper clipped to a registered MG lower for a day, etc.)

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

I usually just break mine down like a regular cleaning, don't forget to remove the buffer and spring as well, hose it out with hot water, by hot I mean hot enough to make the weapon uncomfortable to handle bare handed. Then while it is hot blow everything out with compressed air and let it dry. Then clean and oil as normal and then function check to make sure nothing worked it's way into the fire control group. I have been known to take exceptionally dirty weapons into the shower with me to let the hot water and steam get in and loosen crap up.

When we were first married, my wife looked at me weird once or twice and then when she had to detail clean her dirty weapons and took 3x as long as I did showering with mine the funny looks stopped.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television. 

In general, any time I am worried about the AR being too nasty, I will do a full cleaning. It doesn't take too much time, and there is no real precision to it, so its not that big of a deal.  As Commish said, don't forget the little parts. They like to be lubed too. I don't know what handguard you are running, but I usually take all that off after a really nasty iteration as well.

"Here I abandon peace and desecrate law. Farewell to treaties. Fortune it is you I follow... From now on, war will be my judge."

A little late to the party, but-

Use water as hot as you can stand it with just a little bit of dishwashing soap. Hit the rifle and parts with hot mildly soapy water until the rifle and parts are also hot. Dish soap not only loosens grime, oil & grease, but it reduces water surface tension.  Then rinse with hot water. The heat & soap helps the water run off quickly and evaporate faster, especially water that gets trapped in the nooks and crannies. 

Wiping the rifle down afterward with isopropyl alcohol also helps. Isopropyl alcohol  mixes with water to reduce surface tension for faster more thorough evaporation and helps pull out any water that gets trapped in the nooks and crannies.

Just because it's rocket science doesn't mean it's complicated

Jesus...I saw the title of this thread and immediately thought it was a Rule 4 violation. Glad I was mistaken.

Know thy enemies, but be aware of thy friends...

 

The average age of the world's great civilizations has been 200 years. These nations have progressed through this sequence:
from bondage to spiritual faith;
from spiritual faith to great courage;
from courage to liberty;
from liberty to abundance;
from abundance to selfishness;
from selfishness to complacency;
from complacency to apathy;
from apathy to dependency;
from dependency back again to bondage."

Fresh water immersion (and rain) isn't nearly as destructive as swimming in sea water.  Get out the grit, rinse well, maybe use a spray de-greaser, then oil.  Springs and bits where parkerizing have worn may turn a little orange if not covered with a good rust-preventing oil.  You won't be able to see in the spring/plunger area for the bolt catch or mag catch unless you disassemble (a true pain in the kiester).

M. Wilson posted:

I usually just break mine down like a regular cleaning, don't forget to remove the buffer and spring as well, hose it out with hot water, by hot I mean hot enough to make the weapon uncomfortable to handle bare handed. Then while it is hot blow everything out with compressed air and let it dry. Then clean and oil as normal and then function check to make sure nothing worked it's way into the fire control group. I have been known to take exceptionally dirty weapons into the shower with me to let the hot water and steam get in and loosen crap up.

When we were first married, my wife looked at me weird once or twice and then when she had to detail clean her dirty weapons and took 3x as long as I did showering with mine the funny looks stopped.

I do same, BUT, I leave off the compressed air.  All sorts of shit in there I don't want.

Utah is nice in that there is little naturally occurring water, so getting hot and allowing to air dry is nice.

Just a simple field strip, HOT water rinse, dry (some use blow dryer) and then relube & assemble.

I watched a video recently in which a guy took his SCAR-17 scuba diving to pose with.  Whatever... 

~Will

 




 

 

   Anybody can blow something up, but to disarm anothers bomb, this is when talent, skill, bravery & LUCK will all determine "Success or Failure".  

 

Location: UTAH              Joined: 2003

If runnng a standard front sight base with the adjustable post, be sure to put a couple drops of oil down into the screw base. People tend to forget about that little nook until it’s time to make an adjustment and suddenly parts don’t want to cooperate. 

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