Cracked stock

So, I was able to purchase my former sniper rifle that was being retired. I purchased it mostly for sentimental value, but it got crack in the stock after I left snipers.

The crack runs the circumference of the stock right where the pitcatinny night vision mount was bedded in the stock.

Can simply remove the couple inches of stock on the forend and not affect the rifle’s accuracy?

It is an incredibly accurate rifle and I paid next to nothing for it and I will eventually replace the stock, but I cannot afford (read- my wife won’t let me) to get both decent glass and a stock at the moment.

Sidenote: does anyone want to buy an Iron Brigade Armory Universal Night Vision mount?  I have no use for it in my private life and it was a nice, simple set-up when I shot the gun for work. 

Thanks in advance. 

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What is left when honor is lost?

Original Post

Okay, I went to a reputable local gunsmith and he said he thinks he can fix the stock with brass pins and epoxy for $85.

I’m going to give it a shot based on my sentimental attachment to the stock and the fact that it’s a $400 stock to replace.

Plus he’ll remove the night vision mount so I can sell it. 

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What is left when honor is lost?

WHIT34 posted:

Just remember, anything in contact with the barrel (night vision mount) when removed with change harmonics of barrel and it may shoot differently than before.

I hear you brother.

The NV mount has no contact with the barrel as it free floats the whole way, but I still am going to have to shoot the gun after the stock is fixed to check it’s behavior.

Hopefully it’s still dead nuts on.

Next I have to figure out if I’ll stick with 168 or go down to 155 like my team did.  Whichever it shoots better.

Decisisions, decisions...

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What is left when honor is lost?

TheTick posted:
WHIT34 posted:

Just remember, anything in contact with the barrel (night vision mount) when removed with change harmonics of barrel and it may shoot differently than before.

I hear you brother.

The NV mount has no contact with the barrel as it free floats the whole way, but I still am going to have to shoot the gun after the stock is fixed to check it’s behavior.

Hopefully it’s still dead nuts on.

Next I have to figure out if I’ll stick with 168 or go down to 155 like my team did.  Whichever it shoots better.

Decisisions, decisions...

What’s the rate of twist? 1:10, 1:12?

Mojo/Mark
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Joined: 9/30/09
Location: Northern Nevada (Reno/Sparks)

I can’t tell from the pic but it looks like an HSP stock? Looking at the two I have sitting here I don’t think there would be any issue just cutting those few inches off and bedding in a new sling stud and using either epoxy or a fiberglass patch and some resin to fix the end, in general it should be easy IMO but I haven’t done it.  That said stockys has 10% off HSP and b&c stocks right now and even their own composite stock gets good reviews for a budget Stock for ~$200. 

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Originally Posted by DocGKR:

       
This is why LE in some areas would be better served with belt fed weapons and flame throwers...

       

Joined: 5.23.2009
Location: WA/ Canadian border

That should be a doable  fix.

If it was me*:

The important thing is to have a mechanical means to pull and secure the two halves together.

I'd  replicate something along this concept but longer and  extending farther down  along the forend  and tip for strength.  

WoodRiver Joint Connector, Small, 2-1/2

I'd route out for two of the ties, one on each  side of the bbl. channel.

Squirt the existing crack with epoxy from a syringe and then tighten things up. Fill up the holes with some fiberglass batting and  epoxy.

 

*Stray Round has made every attempt to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information provided. However, the information is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Stray Round does not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, completeness, legality, or reliability of the information contained on this post.

No warranties, promises and/or representations of any kind, expressed or implied, are given as to the nature, standard, accuracy or otherwise of the information provided by Stray Round nor to the suitability or otherwise of the information to your particular circumstances.

I agree in principle withSTRAY ROUND, that I'd repair, not cut and re-cap. First, most stocks are not solid. It may be even foam, but regardless the nose will simply not be right, and the lack of shell reinforcement may make it break further or otherwise go odd. 

I think I'd: 

  • Remove the stock from the gun. 
  • Remove the NOD mount. Assuming it's a bit like the EFR, and you can remove the top but the bottom is bedded into the stock permanently.
  • Get the nose off the rest of the stock. There's no way to get enough glue in there with it in place; if there's some bottom shell that stays in and can flop okay, but I'd not trust the ability to get glue in with a syringe
  • Line it up over and over, so we can be sure it'll line up when done. 
  • Build a jig to tighten it. Not sure how until inspection. My initial hope is something intrinsic we leave partly in place when done, like drill a long hole longitudinally under the barrel, all the way from the magwell to the nose. Details details but put some allthread in the hole, tighten nuts against wooden blocks... 
  • After we slather the broken bit in glue. Probably G-Flex, so it isn't prone to cracking with environmental changes as the stock moves, etc. 
  • Then, clamp it. And leave it that way through the cure period.
  • Think about additional reinforcement. If worried, I'd glue a rod or tube into the tightening hole to reinforce it, but that does start to impact the stock harmonics as it makes it stiffer

But all is contingent on seeing what the damage is like once we get it apart, what the inside material is, etc. 

I have all this stuff, and will happily help if you are by chance anywhere near me. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

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