Detail Strip of Glock Pistols Frequency

     I am looking for information on when agencies or units detail strip their Glock pistols (down to the bare frame).  I have spoken to Glock about what they recommend, but they will not give a solid answer.  I know one agency that used to take their pistols down to the bare frame each year, but they were issuing the steel framed Beretta 96.  I am a Glock armorer and have worked on various makes of guns over my career doing repairs and modifications of various types, but by no means do I consider myself a gunsmith.  It would seem to me that putting a polymer pin in and out of a polymer frame would have a negative affect over time or at least more so than a steel frame and metal roll pins of 3rd gen S&W's, Sig's or Berettas IMHO.

Original Post

450 or so sworn.  Almost all Glocks, a few (with more coming) VP9s, and a couple grandfathered guns.  All guns are officer-owned.

We're behind by a year or so, but we normally detail strip all the handguns every 2 years.  Typically during the 1st inservice of that year, each of 5 districts has their own inservice day, and the Glock armorers get pulled, too.  The guns get detail stripped, cleaned if necessary, parts get inspected, lubed, etc.

Otherwise, nothing prevents officers from detail stripping as they see fit, provided that an armorer does the work.  Personally, I strip mine every 6 months.

"Absorb what is useful.  Discard what is useless.  Add what is specifically your own." -Bruce Lee

We detailed stripped every pistol annually at my agency.  No issues with the polymer wearing out.  Remember that if you do this annually then each pistols pins will come out/go in about 8-12 times based on average replacement of pistol cycles at most agencies.  8-12 times really isn't much at all.  

Its a Glock or MNP. When it gets dirty just toss it and issue a new one. Kinda like rubber gloves.

Seriously though, you are not going to wear out the gun doing an annual detail strip.

On the other hand, what are you going to find during a detail strip that you won't find during a routine function check?

I would not waste the time personally.

Blow the field stripped weapon down with compressed air, do a visual check of parts, lube as needed, reassemble and finish with a function check. Easy day.

I could maybe see it at the 4 or 5 year mark depending on typical round count as part of a MSLEP. Maybe annually on special team guns that might be seeing 10K or more rounds a year.

I could also see doing a detail strip on a gun that had been DX'd with a complaint tag.

Annually.  Weakest link so far has been the pins, but even those rarely fail. Whatever polymer Glock uses there is pretty solid. Much more so than whatever Gripforce ships with their adapter. Removed one of those from a personal gun and it was warped enough that I had to source a replacement pin.   Out of an abundance of caution you could simply replace the pins each time you do a detailed disassembly but that's really not necessary.

---------- I pray that my son, when he is 60, and your son, when he is 60...will live in a world from which the great ugliness that has scarred our century has passed. Enjoying their freedoms, they will be grateful that, at the threatened nightfall, the blood of their fathers ran strong. ----------

I can't imagine wearing out those pins.  We do a detail strip/inspection once per year - which I think is a complete waste of time, but it's policy.  Most officers at our department shoot about 100 rounds per year max.  Admin likely less.  Tac team more, but no really crazy amounts.  Our guns do 10 years.  I've never seen a pin break or wear out.  I think you're more likely to lose the damn things by dropping them.  

I think our tac team should get a full yearly strip it down inspection - the rest just look to make sure people aren't swapping aftermarket parts, and check sear engagements.  Blow out the dust bunnies with an air compressor.  

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It's easy to make assumptions about puppies strapped to missiles, but good science requires research.

 

Joined: 12-2005          Location: Central OK

Why?  I'm going to be  a dick, but why in the blue fuck would you detail strip a working pistol?  In the 23 years I've been doing this, from a 950 deputy department to a 25 officer department, we have never had a detail-strip unless there was something wrong with the gun.  Neither do any of the other agencies in the area do this.   Annual armorer's inspection, yes.  5k round or time scheduled spring replacements,  yes.  But never detail strip.  Most pistols suffer more damage from detail stripping than regular use.   I know when we carried revolvers we sure as shit weren't popping side plates every couple of years...

I feel like if you are damaging your pistol, (Glock), during a detail strip, you probably shouldn't be touching pistols, or even driving a car for that matter. I don't see the advantage to doing it, you will not likely find anything you won't find in a regular strip, but that statement rubs me as being untrue and alarmist. It's a Glock, not a swiss watch. 

Broken off pencil tips, a large ball of animal fur, locking blocks cracked in two, broken slide stop springs, broken pins.  

These are things that I have found by doing an armorer tear down on other peoples' guns every two years.  Not to mention the usual dirt and/or lack of lubrication.  The items above might not have presented a problem, or might not cause a problem yet. Most guns pass the function check; some don't.  The question is, knowing what we know about cops, do you think the officer who must have been using his gun as a pencil sharpener cleans/shoots/ function checks his gun at any regular interval, or at all?

Granted, I shoot enough that I probably don't need to break mine down as often as I do.

"Absorb what is useful.  Discard what is useless.  Add what is specifically your own." -Bruce Lee

Chameleox posted:

Broken off pencil tips, a large ball of animal fur, locking blocks cracked in two, broken slide stop springs, broken pins.  

These are things that I have found by doing an armorer tear down on other peoples' guns every two years.  Not to mention the usual dirt and/or lack of lubrication.  The items above might not have presented a problem, or might not cause a problem yet. Most guns pass the function check; some don't.  The question is, knowing what we know about cops, do you think the officer who must have been using his gun as a pencil sharpener cleans/shoots/ function checks his gun at any regular interval, or at all?

Granted, I shoot enough that I probably don't need to break mine down as often as I do.

To add to this,

Broken trigger bars, broken trigger springs, broken/damaged firing pins, broken slides, bulged barrels. Oil dripping out of the pistol or never any oil at all. White lithium grease packed in the pistol. Sights "fused" to the slide by rust. Magazines that look like dog chew toys. A Jolly  Rancher wrapper discovered inside a trigger housing.   FML

The factory front sights, slide stop springs, and pins seem to go first. Amazingly, the pistols will usually still function (-broken firing  pin). 

Joined: November 19, 2002          Location: Jacksonville, FL

Longeye posted:
On the other hand, what are you going to find during a detail strip that you won't find during a routine function check?

 

Broken locking block and trigger housing pins.  I haven seen several examples of each, in guns that passed a function test and fired live ammunition, just fine - for now...  

Along with the other issues mentioned, light strikes caused by a combination of debris, solvent, and lubricant gummed up in the firing pin channel and on the components won't be found unless a detail strip is conducted.  I prefer not to wait until the firearm tells me something is wrong if it can be corrected before your life is in jeopardy.  How often to do it will depend on your annual training cycle and then go from there.  It isn't necessarily just about how many rounds that are fired, but a combination of what type of abuse or neglect is going on. 

My first department (250 sworn and reserve) performed an annual detail strip  of every sidearm (G22 and G27). Most common issue was gummed up strikers. My current agency has been issuing the H&K P2000 for 10 years with no preventative maintenance of any kind. I have been suggesting it for the last 3 years.  In our POE (175 armed officers) we are currently seeing broken trigger return springs at the rate of 1-2 per month. Still no plans to preemptively replace everyone's springs.

Hi, I'm SPD, and I'm going to eat crow.  Here's why.

I said above I can't imagine the pins wearing out.  Saw it yesterday.  Another agency was using my range to get a few people qualified.  One gun (gen 3 G22) kept malfunctioning.  They ask me to take a look.  Top pin missing.  

I thought - and said - there's no way that just fell out.  I had a spare in my emergency armorer kit, and dropped it in.  Basically, the hole was so loose, you could shake the top pin out.  The bottom pin would then start to walk while firing.  I don't know how old the pistol was, but it was an issued agency gun.  I told them to deadline it and send it in to be replaced. No clue if they did or not, but I hope so.

I've never seen a hole so wallered out it wouldn't hold the pin.  Now I have.  

I've been wrong before.  Just ask my wife.  

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It's easy to make assumptions about puppies strapped to missiles, but good science requires research.

 

Joined: 12-2005          Location: Central OK

We detail strip out Glocks and other authorized service pistols every two years.  We alternate between a general cursory inspection then a detailed strip/inspection the following year.  Most common problems I see with our Glocks are the trigger springs breaking, locking block pins breaking and occasionally the slide lock spring breaking.  

We regularly change out the recoil springs and other springs in the guns. The timeline is dependent upon operator use. (Shooter or carries a gun because he has to) We encourage our guys to keep an idea of round count. 

I haven't noticed any damage to any of our Glocks due to detail stripping, we even have a few 2nd Gen guns still in service with a couple guys. 

 

I am going to bring this thread back to life.

What parts are you guy replacing at what round counts?

I am seeing between 5-15k on stuff. I have looked at Glock's owner's and armorer's manuals and am not seeing anything there.

Joined: 3/27/09          Location: Back in MA for now

I swap springs when I start to 'feel' like it's kicking more. The only thing I have HAD to replace was the locking block pin because it broke (I'm rocking a third hand, mid range Gen III, so who knows how many rounds were on it...

Bart

"I've got an 8 man team and we're at the Michael Jackson Theater. There's a thousand people in there. We'll protect them."

Unit 792, 01Oct17

Small agency of about 110 sworn. About 95% Glocks, all 9mm. About 5 or 6 M&Ps, and three VP9s. A few old timers still carry 3rd Gen Smiths and one wily Ruger P89 still continues chugging along. We have perhaps a dozen Glock armorers and one M&P armorer, but no mandated inspections which is kinda shocking. In my 8.5 years on, I changed recoil spring assemblies regularly but just had my old duty G17 stripped for the first time and it was good to go. I've been carrying VP9s since April 2015, but no local armorer support and I doubt the PD will pay for me to to VA for the course. I'll likely be switching to the M&P 2.0 before the year is out. 

_______________________

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of Evil is for good men to do nothing." ~Edmund Burke

 

"You are here to put in work...If you know AR 670-1 better than FM 7-8, get the fuck out of my face." ~MickFury

Any of the armorers replacing the firing pin liner? Just wanted to know as from what I'm reading on the internet if you pull it out it's trashed in the process. I've got spares if the firing pin channel gets clogged somehow and the firing pin won't freely move.  This has never happened to me .

Willy V

 

Joined: March 18 2008 Location: Beervana AKA Oregon

Willy V posted:

Any of the armorers replacing the firing pin liner? Just wanted to know as from what I'm reading on the internet if you pull it out it's trashed in the process. I've got spares if the firing pin channel gets clogged somehow and the firing pin won't freely move.  This has never happened to me .

This is the reason I would do armorers service on service weapons every year.  Folks get all kinds of gunk in the firing pin channel.

Generally you won't need to pull the liners, I've seen several come out on their own. 

All you really need to clean the striker channel are these:

https://www.brownells.com/gun-...ators-prod13150.aspx

........along with aerosol cleaner such as gun scrubber.

ETA:  Get the brownell's ones, I bought some off Amazon Prime and the sticks break too easily.

 

 

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