Disclaimer - these are from the square range:

Normally a top off or load from empty is done just as you mention, right handed into the tube, port arms or low ready.

In a combat situation, you can also load an empty rifle over the top while shouldered and on target. With the lever down and the bolt open, you can drop one in the top on a Winchester or over to the right side on a Marlin with the left hand, close the bolt and be live while you load the remainder with the right hand into the tube. It takes some practice, but my then teenage daughter managed it quite well.

I've seen some lever gun shooters shoot left handed. This may have been to facilitate the loading into the tube with the weak side right hand. It may also have been to transition to the single action revolver on the strong side.

Like any platform, practice practice practice.

csivret posted:

Whats your favourite way to quickly and efficiently reload the rifle or keep it topped up?

I was thinking reloading from a belt or bandoleer straight into the loading port with the right hand would be good.

For .357 I've tweeked 8mm mauser stripper clips to hold 38/357 rounds.  With needle nose pliers it just takes a few seconds to get them to hold the rounds with the tension you want.

For 30-30 the plastic belt holders that Federal 30-30 ammo are handy if you cut them down to hold five rounds and cut off the belt loop.   I've never bought any 45-70 factory  rounds to know if Federal packs them the same way.

Carrying rounds this way is quieter, less bulky and faster than loose rounds.  Just grab the stripper/holder with the support hand and then hold the rifle near the receiver and the pack of rounds and individually feed them  into the loading gate with the strong hand.  The rounds are right next to the loading gate so it is pretty fast and could probably be done on the move if necessary with little trouble.  

I'd imagine if a person did some searching there is probably some sort of belt pouch that could be re-purposed  to neatly hold the stripper clips or plastic shell holders.   Now I'll have to rummage though my assortment of junk treasure but I'm sure I'll  only succeed in finding something I've lost and replaced.

Another thing I've learned about lever guns is to always check to see the magazine follower when unloading.  I had a Win 94 that was the proverbial unloaded gun until working the lever and hearing and seeing a round pop back on the lifter.  Turns out that the mag tube had worked forward because the end of the screw that retains it and fits into a recess in the barrel had sheared and allow the rim of the cartridge to catch in the small gap created between receiver and tube.    I thought I had cranked all the rounds out of the gun but that one was hiding and waiting.    Not a good feeling.

I now unload all rounds, except if there is one in the chamber, by rolling the gun to get the round on the lifter to fall out into my hand and when I think I've got them all, making sure I can see the magazine follower and not the base of a cartridge.

I imagine you all know this but no one told me and I luckily didn;t find out with a ND.

 

 

Uncle explosively redecorated a closet ceiling that way with a .357 Marlin.  New gun to him and he miscounted..

 

Tuff Strips can work for feeding the gun, and apparently they make them in .30-30 now. 

I just load the levergun with my right (dominate) hand. The 30-30 and 45/70 have butt cuffs.  I use 6 round belt loops (2x) with the .44 Marlin.  Really when afield I’ll have a handgun on so if things got loud and I emptied the 6/5/10 round levergun magazine I’d transition to the handgun till a lull allowed reloading the rifle.  
It’s really the nature of the beast when relying on 1800’s technology.

 

 

556223 posted:

I have a BLR in .284 Win, not many of those around.

As a boy I lusted for a  Savage 99 in .284.  Never saw one in real life.  

If  Savage would make a 99A in .250 again,  I'd be sitting in a lawn chair waiting for the first off the line.

Long ago read an article on a Sav 99 that was chambered in .35/284.   Oh, for lions tigers and bears.

stray round posted:
556223 posted:

I have a BLR in .284 Win, not many of those around.

As a boy I lusted for a  Savage 99 in .284.  Never saw one in real life.  

If  Savage would make a 99A in .250 again,  I'd be sitting in a lawn chair waiting for the first off the line.

Long ago read an article on a Sav 99 that was chambered in .35/284.   Oh, for lions tigers and bears.

I passed on a Savage 99C in .284 some years back as I already had 6 .284s at that time to include my favorite Winchester 88 lever.  For a number of years I hadn't hunted with my .284s after my wife got me a model 70 .300WSM (felt obligated), but i  killed my '17 WY antelope with a Ruger 77 .284, my '18 WY 4X4 mulie with my Win 88 lever, and last season took a WY antelope and MT antelope/mulie with a Cooper .284.  Do you think that I may have developed a fetish of some kind?

Guys, try using AK/SKS stripper clips for .357   I have my Grandfathers 99 in .250 Savage, fun to shoot. Like to find one in 30-30, wonder if that action could handle 7.62x39 ?

Dave

I am pending a relocation to a BAN state (Hawaii), and high-cap mags are illegal.

So, this thread got me thinking about getting a 'HAWG GETTIN GUN'.

I did my shopping and was weighing the pricing vs options difference between an 1895 DARK or an 1895SBL, when I got offered a sweet trade on a nib DARK 1895:

I am thinking I want to add a few things to increase function, but also try and keep it as basic as possible.

1)  I already am not a fan of the paracord wrapped lever, and thinking something with a bit of padding but easily removed and cleaned-dried as I will be going into the tropical jungle to get the piggies.

2) Safety needs to go

3) de horn the hammer & smooth up the action

4) Maybe optics...  (MRO-T2/H2-LPVO-?)

5) definitely a light

6) a better sling than the cheese grater paracord in the box

7) a muzzle brake !?!?

8) Maybe the MI M-LOK rail

9) Seriously thinking cerakote'ing everything.

Again keeping with the mission: In a tropical rainforest environment, with ranges as short as stumble upon to 250 yards: PIG KILLER.  

Hawaii state law is no mag over 10 rounds, no night hunting, suppressors are illegal, SBR's are illegal, pistol AR's are illegal.  Yay ban state.

WW,

Good luck with the move, we did 3 years on Oahu while on AD.  We go back annually (in normal years). At the time, the Hickam Rod & Gun Club had an FFL.  I actually took delivery of 3-4 guns in the personnel shop at the HQ PACAF Bldg. guessing that doesn't work anymore. 

I have a Dark 1895,  in 45-70, on perpetual back-order w/Brownell's.  I think I'll feel the same way about the paracord features, but will see. Please keep posting as you shake it out and add accessories.   

Short 45-70’s aren’t fun to shoot. Personally, I think a 94 marlin in 44mag is more fun/useable/shootable for most applications.

With 300 gr XTP or 305 gr LBT they are dang near at 45-70 performance, and can easily be run with lighter/pleasant loads suitable for anything short of putting big stuff on the ground.

JS7SFGA posted:

Short 45-70’s aren’t fun to shoot. Personally, I think a 94 marlin in 44mag is more fun/useable/shootable for most applications.

With 300 gr XTP or 305 gr LBT they are dang near at 45-70 performance, and can easily be run with lighter/pleasant loads suitable for anything short of putting big stuff on the ground.

Agree with both of those points.

SS7SFGA & Malpaso,

I 'm sure you are both correct, never fired a .45-70, don't need one, don't live in Bear country or plan to hunt AZ game of suitable size. 

More so than other questionable gun buys (a semi UZI and an FN5.7[I choose to blame a Friend who could get a better deal if he bought two]) sold the UZI at a profit, not so much on the FN, just kind of wanted it. We'll see. 

JS7SFGA posted:

Short 45-70’s aren’t fun to shoot. Personally, I think a 94 marlin in 44mag is more fun/useable/shootable for most applications.

With 300 gr XTP or 305 gr LBT they are dang near at 45-70 performance, and can easily be run with lighter/pleasant loads suitable for anything short of putting big stuff on the ground.

I looked at the .44MAG 1894.  I also currently own a repro 1866 in .45Colt.  I also looked at a local .444 MARLIN.

I initially looked at the .45-70 as a dated old-assed cartridge, modernly surpassed by others.  I was keenly leaning towards the Marlin 336w in .30-30

A 44Mag can equal a subsonic load of the .45-70 is a more correct statement, even a +P+ .44MAG is going to have comparable performance to a middle of the road  .45-70 cartridge.

 

To compare realistic numbers here is the referenced: .44MAG XTP Hornady 300gr

MUZZLE_____VELOCITY (FPS) _____ENERGY (FT/LB)
____________________1150_________________881
 
The .44Mag +P+ with 340gr (Buffalo Bore)
MUZZLE_____VELOCITY (FPS) _____ENERGY (FT/LB)
____________________1478_________________1649
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

But where the .45-70 shines is range of CAPABILITY (NOT range as in distance, unless one plots IDF/Plunging fires!)

One could shoot some lighter loaded Hornady Subsonic .45-70  410gr
MUZZLE_____VELOCITY (FPS) _____ENERGY (FT/LB)
____________________1075_________________1052
 
Average 45-70 363gr [gundata dot org]
MUZZLE_____VELOCITY (FPS) _____ENERGY (FT/LB)
____________________1680_________________2274
 
Hornady 82747 LEVERevolution 45-70 325gr Flex Tip Expanding
MUZZLE_____VELOCITY (FPS) _____ENERGY (FT/LB)
____________________2050_________________3032
 

 

Here are a couple specialty cartridges:

350gr SUPERJACK 

MUZZLE_____VELOCITY (FPS) _____ENERGY (FT/LB)
____________________2000_________________3100

  Taylor Knockout Value: 52; Chamber Pressure: 35,000-cup;

 

 

500gr EXITER  

MUZZLE_____VELOCITY (FPS) _____ENERGY (FT/LB)
____________________1550_________________2670

  Taylor Knockout Value: 50; Chamber Pressure: 35,000-cup;

 

For those in pursuit of elephant, rhino, hippo, and Cape buffalo in situations that require a FMJ solid, we enthusiastically recommend our Exiter Ammo featuring the Hornady DGS 500-gr Flatnose Solid, with its Copper-Clad Steel Jacket. Copper-Clad for proper barrel compatibility and a heavy Steel Jacket for tremendous strength, this premium solid provides impressive penetration of the heaviest thick-skinned game. This Hornady Copper-Clad Steel Jacket Solid has been proving itself for three decades now on the world’s heaviest game, and is now available for the first time in a flatnose version, making it safe for use in lever-action rifles. We enthusiastically utilize this bullet in our Exiter Ammo for use against elephant, rhino, hippo, and Cape buffalo when the situation requires an FMJ solid.

 

 

BUT WHY .45-70!? 

 

Sure there are some super powerful cartridges and calibers out there, but also at a higher cost for the platform and the cartridges (Hawaii ammunition & powder is either hand carried via airplane or shipped via boat - so either EXPENSIVE or LONG shipping times).

 

I was stationed in Hawaii in 1994 when TYKE broke loose.  The cops with their AR's, Shotguns and 9mm handguns were wearing the animal down.

But it was a lever gun that took it to its knees.  It was lethal injection from a vet that ended TYKE's life.

Sure its a ONCE in a lifetime occurrence, but, its also the CAPABILITY that is there by loading UP specialty cartridges (AND EXPENSIVE!!).

Maybe stopping the engine on an armored car, or Semi-Truck...  Or stopping a threat that is behind COVER (which takes away their defensive 'cover' and renders only 'concealment')

 

 

I do NOT have much experience owning the 45-70, this is my first.  I have shot others' (16" & 24") and they weren't that bad with mitigation efforts (recoil pad & magna-porting).  I have had a sorer shoulder from whacking ducks & geese with 3.5" shells.  But that was a couple hours.  I am not "planning" on shooting ALOT of .45-70 - as its also pricey.

 

My justification: (FWIW)

The .45-70 has a range of capability that is legal where I am heading.  Typical short to 250 yard range but sometimes needs shoot thru brush & still have KNOCKDOWN power.  I can shoot some soft subs (suppressors are illegal in HI !) or some real engine block splitting  physical therapy on the shoulder after two rounds ball busters.

 

I was eyeing the .30-30 very keenly!  The 336w would have met all my stated interests, and even loading out a couple penetrator rounds offers a slick capability & range!  Then I stumbled upon the DEAL I got on the nib 1895 DARK that is mine!

 

I was doing some online learning and observed a picture of a fella:

 

Which got me asking: Why have a 'QUIVER' of two rounds on the side?  What the hell is that gonna do?  Well, if a person is carrying two HOT +P 350gr-500+gr cartridges, that is a hell of an instant capability to have if perceived as NEEDED.

 

No one has brought up the cartridge I have propping up my Marlin Dark with ? 

 

On a LIGHT-ER-FIGHTER note:

JS7SFGA posted:

Short 45-70’s aren’t fun to shoot. Personally, I think a 94 marlin in 44mag is more fun/useable/shootable for most applications.

With 300 gr XTP or 305 gr LBT they are dang near at 45-70 performance, and can easily be run with lighter/pleasant loads suitable for anything short of putting big stuff on the ground.

The old cartridge is adaptable.  With “Cowboy” loads they really aren’t bad, about like a 20ga shotgun with field loads. My wife killed her first deer with a 400gr lead bullet over 15.0 gr of Unique.  

However my favorite load is a 360gr cast bullet at @ 1,950fps.  It’s really not that bad offhand, brutal from the bench.  Under 2” groups at 100 yards with a 2.5x Scout scope.  You don’t need to magnumize the old .45/70 Government to kill normal game.  But it’s fun to do. FWIW We have His & Hers Guide Guns. 

There is a real difference in watching a .44 Mag out of a rifle or a .45/70 impact deer size game.   Not that a .44 is tossing spitwads, but the old Government round was intended to take a horse out from under an enemy combatant.

Worked up and tested a new load for my Marlin .38-55, model 336CB. This gun falls somewhere in between the 1894 (.44 and .357) and 1895 (.45-70) models we've been discussing, and is the same as the .30-30 model 336 except, as a CB, it has an 8 round magazine, which is an interesting option for the quantity/power discussions.

This is a load I ran across on a couple of lever gun reloading forums, and not something you'd find in a "formal" manual or web site. Some of these guys are old timers, and have been making up their own loads for decades, and shooting out to 800yds, and sometimes more with iron sights.

Anyway, a lot of them are using Unique, which isn't a mainstream powder from my experience at least, and they're using it in varying weights across a number of calibers.

I was pleased to find how well it worked. It's a very comfortable load, and I was hitting an 8" plate at 100yds off hand, more often than not. Shooting alone (social distancing ) I didn't have the luxury of knowing where the misses were going. But I was there for the entertainment and distraction.

If anyone is interested, here it is -

240gr RNFP, Lasercast .380

10gr Unique

2.559 COAL

 

I've never noticed the recoil of the few factory  405gr standard 45-70 loads I've shot.  I've found them quite mild.

I've used 13 to 14gr of Red Dot and 350gr cast bullets and they are quite mild with little muzzle blast in an 18" bbl  or recoil and shoot as accurate as I can hold. With 405gr  and 13 gr of Red Dot, they are equal to the old black powder loads and neither plains Indians  or buffalo complained about them being too weak.

A flat heavy bullet cutting a  full .45 cal hole completely penetrating and crushing any bone in its way,   how much more is any added velocity going to help unless you like recoil?

I dug out my old Marlin 1894CS  in  .357 yesterday forgot how compact and slick  it is compared to even a 16" bbl AR.   No mag, sights  or pistol grip protruding, it is about like carrying a yard stick.  

I've got a scout scope rail coming and I'm going to try tweaking the barrel bands and couple other things. If I can get it constantly shooting  within  3"  as it heats up I'll hold on to it as I have a wheel barrow of .38 brass.    Stiff  .38 loads are like a .22 rimfire but must be approaching .357 loads out of a handgun and are incredibly fun to shoot.

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CWM11B posted:

Have I mentioned kicking myself for not buying an 1894CS in .357 AND .44 lately?  

I think I bought my .357 in 1990 and had been looking for a couple of years.  I had a couple of dealers I know call distributors and browsed a bunch of gun shows.  No luck.    I walked in after giving up on one and about a year later  found one that had just been put out on display  in a large sporting goods store.    It came home with me.

I don;t know if they are still that hard to find but I've never seen one on a used rack and  few new ones over the years.

I don't know if they sell quickly or no distributors/dealers order them because they don't think they will sell because they are not the latest whiz bang.

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.357s and .44s, except Rossi 1892s for some reason tend to be unobtanium, though Henry dealers seem to be able to get anything they make. A Henry X in those calibers would do.

MrMurphy posted:

.357s and .44s, except Rossi 1892s for some reason tend to be unobtanium, though Henry dealers seem to be able to get anything they make. A Henry X in those calibers would do.

The only thing about the Henry's (I have one in .45LC) is that you don't have the loading gate on the side of the receiver.  You load through the mag tube, like an old pump .22.  It pretty much eliminates tactical reloads of any kind of efficiency.

Tankersteve

I always wondered why pump-action centerfire rifles never caught on like the lever actions did. There was the Colt Lightning back in Billy the Kid's day, Winchester made some neat .22 pump rifles, and Remington did the 760, but the centerfire pump rifles have always been pretty rare birds. I find a pump a lot easier to shoot than a lever action, especially for fast follow-up shots.

tankersteve posted:

The only thing about the Henry's (I have one in .45LC) is that you don't have the loading gate on the side of the receiver.  You load through the mag tube, like an old pump .22.  It pretty much eliminates tactical reloads of any kind of efficiency.

Tankersteve

They started making them with a loading gate now.   

More temptation.

For me when loading eyes off and gun unmounted , grabbing the action in the left hand and loading with the right works smooth.  Drunks might not be able to find their nose with their eyes closed but I bet they could stick an index finger in their palm without looking.   

Works the same with sliding rounds in the loading gate, probably uses and puts to work about as hard wired  coordination as sticking food in our mouths.

 

Testing: The New Henry 30:30 – The Gun News

Assuming a Henry rifle and Marlin rifle are both in the same caliber, is the distance the lever moves when cycling the action appreciably shorter on either brand?

Tony

Tom:

The Lightning’s are very fragile actions. I own them in small, medium, and large frame. If you break a part, repairing them is an ordeal.

The USFA Lightning was faithful to the Colt, but the chamber of the 38-40 I had was too big to do anything but shear case heads. 

Uberti makes a copy.

Fun in pistol calibers. Not sturdy enough for the rifle cartridges and hard use like a lever.

The Henry is basically a Marlin clone. No appreciable difference in throw on the ones I've handled. 

And yes with the X, Henry discovered what everyone else knew in 1866, side gates are better. Enough ppl said I'd buy a Henry BUT only with a gate...they listened.

Boppa posted:

He also has a .45 colt Marlin and a .38-55 Marlin for sale also

there’s a .450 Marlin for sale in the same website in Kansas

I am glad I already have a carbine, otherwise I would be tempted to F the Quarantine & make that drive to Kansas and check out that 450 Marlin for $600.  

Pro’s: 1) Earred rear peep, 2) XS SCOUT Rail, 3) Magnaported barrel, 4) Ammo might actually be found in a store right now

Con’s: 1) finding stocked ammo, 2) Handloading .450 Marlin ammo (Not scary, its just a RIMLESS .45-70)

Antonius posted:

Assuming a Henry rifle and Marlin rifle are both in the same caliber, is the distance the lever moves when cycling the action appreciably shorter on either brand?

Tony

That is a great question!  I know the gamers in the cowboy action world prefer the Uberti repro and there are all sorts of ‘short stroking’ kits for their rifles, but I don’t know about hunting-defense robustness with heavy working loads rather than “pistol Pete popping” loads knocking down steel.

Tom posted:

I always wondered why pump-action centerfire rifles never caught on like the lever actions did. There was the Colt Lightning back in Billy the Kid's day, Winchester made some neat .22 pump rifles, and Remington did the 760, but the centerfire pump rifles have always been pretty rare birds. I find a pump a lot easier to shoot than a lever action, especially for fast follow-up shots.

I too like pump action shotguns.  I bought a Lightning and it was TERRIBLE.  Jam-a-metic right out of the box, even sent it off to slick it up and it came back better, but still sucking.  I traded it off for an English double barrel shotgun.

I was looking at an older Marlin in 30-06 pump action, but, just haven’t heard GOOD things.

I think the category of firearms needs a ROBUST action to be adapted over from SHOTGUNS to RIFLES.

But then again, its probably been looked at and discarded.  (Not a hard reference able number: just a for instance) A shift of +/- of 1+ MOA isn’t a big deal with a SHOTGUN at 100 yards but a rifle expected to shoot beyond 100 yards thats a hard NOPE.

 

Great discussions!

EDITED TO ADD:

In reviewing load data I did come across this nugget regarding reloading data and "strong actions" (LONGMIRE writers are full of shit!) 

WARNING: Our load data is only for use in the new breed of “Strong Action” rifles such as those listed below:

  • Newly manufactured Marlin Model 1895 rifles
  • Browning Model 1886 rifles
  • Replica (not original) Sharps Model 1874 single shots
  • Original Winchester Model 1886 lever action and Model 1885 single-shot rifles known to be in good condition that have been thoroughly checked out by a competent gunsmith.

Additionally, this data may be safely used with any rifle classified as “stronger” than those listed above, such as:

  • Ruger No. 1 and No. 3 single-shots
  • Browning model 1885 single shot
  • Mauser M98 bolt actions properly converted to fire 45-70 ammunition.

Under no circumstances should this data be used in Original Trapdoor Springfields, modern trapdoor replicas, original Sharps Model 1874 rifles, any rolling block actions, or other original (old) 45-70 rifles. If you are not SURE as to the strength of your particular rifle, contact the manufacturer or Customer Service.

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After SHOT this year I wandered into my local NFA store, and he just happened to have a Henry X in .45-70.  I happened to already own a Silencerco Hybrid, and he knew this.  I ended up buying it, despite not really being much of a lever action guy.  I have only done very basic work with it; function checked it with a variety of loads (405 soft point, 300 solid copper, and 325 FTX.)  Off hand; it shoots dead to point of aim at 50 yards with the 405gr load.  I haven't done any accuracy work with it, but it was keeping everything on a 5" steel plate at 50 yds with irons...so I'm not anticipating anything shockingly bad.

The rounds suppresses well; it is very mild on the ear, and felt recoil is pleasant, even with the full power stuff.  It is a super versatile round; I don't know what I will hunt with it, but it could be anything.  I live on the west side of the mountains in Montana, so generally 100 to 150 yards is a long shot. 

I got a picatinny rail on it, and will be putting a low power variable scope on as funds allow.

I am very pleased thus far, and feel this will be a great addition to the stable.  I have always been a .45-70 fan, and bought the Hybrid with the idea that somebody would wise up and make a modern .45-70 bolt gun at some point, since I was stupid enough to sell my Navy Arms Siamese Mauser a while ago...

In doing my research, the Henry is an almost direct copy of the Marlin, and is rated for whatever loads are recommended in the Marlin.  I did find that I can put 5 rounds in the magazine, not the 4 claimed on Henry's site...almost a 6th.  The action of the Henry is much smoother than of the last couple Marlins I've felt.  I know Marlin is on the rise, but the Henry X's I've felt (the one I bought and a couple other my store has gotten in) are buttery smooth.

Simple snap cap solution.

With this lever thing becoming an addiction again, I've pulled out a couple of rifles to get reacquainted. 

Needed snap caps and didn't want to dig out every thing to make a few cartridges. Plus, I'm always afraid of getting live rounds somehow mixed up despite trying to be careful with marking, holes,etc.   When I was younger I had to think and plan to do stupid tricks but now that I'm older I can do them unconsciously  with out effort.  It's not encouraging. 

I have some flat pieces  of a hard black rubber similar in elasticity to O-rings.  Drill a hole in the rubber larger than the end of the firing pin that extends from the rear of the bolt.  With the hole centered cut out a square just slightly larger than the area in the bolt where the hammer comes to rest. 

Squeeze the square into the rear of the bolt with hole around firing pin.  You can dry fire and run the lever and the springiness of the rubber keeps it  retained in the lever and the hammer doesn't impact the firing pin.  So no  possible damage to firing pin.     Unlike some firearms the front firing pin will break with dry firing.  

I'm also trying to get in the habit of lowering the hammer like I do with CZ pistols.  Place the off thumb in front of the hammer and slide in case it slips off the strong hand thumb.  I haven't let one slip but then there is that age thing as well as wet/cold hands.

 

GMDR has some good load data using pistol powders for lever guns. I use 11gr of Titegroup for 300gr and 12gr for 405gr cast bullets in my Marlin 1895CB. These are really mild shooting and great for plinking on steel etc and I wouldn't hesitate to use either one on whitetails at 100yds or under. If you are buy a new Marlin aka "Remlin" make sure you have a good return policy at your LGS or give it a thorough looking over. Mine has been back to the factory and even then it came back jacked up.....

http://www.gmdr dot com/lever/lowveldata.htm

jwdlm posted:

GMDR has some good load data using pistol powders for lever guns. I use 11gr of Titegroup for 300gr and 12gr for 405gr cast bullets in my Marlin 1895CB. These are really mild shooting and great for plinking on steel etc and I wouldn't hesitate to use either one on whitetails at 100yds or under. If you are buy a new Marlin aka "Remlin" make sure you have a good return policy at your LGS or give it a thorough looking over. Mine has been back to the factory and even then it came back jacked up.....

http://www.gmdr dot com/lever/lowveldata.htm

Could you share some of the issues that you have encountered?

Thanks!

 

stray round posted:

Simple snap cap solution.

With this lever thing becoming an addiction again, I've pulled out a couple of rifles to get reacquainted. 

Needed snap caps and didn't want to dig out every thing to make a few cartridges. Plus, I'm always afraid of getting live rounds somehow mixed up despite trying to be careful with marking, holes,etc.   When I was younger I had to think and plan to do stupid tricks but now that I'm older I can do them unconsciously  with out effort.  It's not encouraging. 

I have some flat pieces  of a hard black rubber similar in elasticity to O-rings.  Drill a hole in the rubber larger than the end of the firing pin that extends from the rear of the bolt.  With the hole centered cut out a square just slightly larger than the area in the bolt where the hammer comes to rest. 

Squeeze the square into the rear of the bolt with hole around firing pin.  You can dry fire and run the lever and the springiness of the rubber keeps it  retained in the lever and the hammer doesn't impact the firing pin.  So no  possible damage to firing pin.     Unlike some firearms the front firing pin will break with dry firing.  

I'm also trying to get in the habit of lowering the hammer like I do with CZ pistols.  Place the off thumb in front of the hammer and slide in case it slips off the strong hand thumb.  I haven't let one slip but then there is that age thing as well as wet/cold hands.

 

Out of curiosity, what weapon are you doing this for?  This wouldn't work on an 1866 and I question it on the 1895.

Aren't you concerned about the rubber bit falling out while cycling the action?

All this 'solution' makes me re-think doing the cross bolt delete on the 1895.  

Dry fire drills are no joke.  They should be done in an area you don't mind putting a hole in.  Practice like you fight & all that.

I have seen 'folks' practice their drills, and specifically do it with a surface to the front & sides that will withstand whatever caliber they are practicing AND that will frag the shit out of them if they lose SA and put one down range!

I am considering doing the slather the action-bolt with polishing compound and cycling about 150 times to 'wear it in' as some folks reccomend.

I will of course put a few rounds down range at the appropriate time & place as thats absolutely the best for building skills and breaking in the action.

Wild_Willie posted: 
Out of curiosity, what weapon are you doing this for?  This wouldn't work on an 1866 and I question it on the 1895.

I'm using it in the Marlin actions.  I didn't think it would ride in there either and first tried an pencil eraser across the slot and it worked.  It is so light weight  and retained by the springiness, it doesn't sling out and the camming surface quickly diverts any force away from it.

"Practice like you fight & all that."   I'll try that excuse on my wife if I let one off in the house.

Wild_Willie posted:

Out of curiosity, what weapon are you doing this for?  This wouldn't work on an 1866 and I question it on the 1895.

Aren't you concerned about the rubber bit falling out while cycling the action?

All this 'solution' makes me re-think doing the cross bolt delete on the 1895.  

Dry fire drills are no joke.  They should be done in an area you don't mind putting a hole in.  Practice like you fight & all that.

I have seen 'folks' practice their drills, and specifically do it with a surface to the front & sides that will withstand whatever caliber they are practicing AND that will frag the shit out of them if they lose SA and put one down range!

I am considering doing the slather the action-bolt with polishing compound and cycling about 150 times to 'wear it in' as some folks reccomend.

I will of course put a few rounds down range at the appropriate time & place as thats absolutely the best for building skills and breaking in the action.

The cross bolt safety on the 1895 is nice for allowing dry firing and I use the o'ring method to prevent it from being engaged. There are several good videos on slicking up the Marlin 336 action that I used for doing my 1895 when I added the Ranger Point lever. I used several of their shims on the lever which also made a big improvement. If you pull the bolt and re-install the lever you'll see where it can make contact with the receiver when side pressure is applied. The guys at Ranger Point Precision are super helpful if you have questions and I really like their products.

jwdlm posted:

The cross bolt safety on the 1895 is nice for allowing dry firing and I use the o'ring method to prevent it from being engaged. There are several good videos on slicking up the Marlin 336 action that I used for doing my 1895 when I added the Ranger Point lever. I used several of their shims on the lever which also made a big improvement. If you pull the bolt and re-install the lever you'll see where it can make contact with the receiver when side pressure is applied. The guys at Ranger Point Precision are super helpful if you have questions and I really like their products.

I just ordered their lightened medium loop lever...  Dammit, didn't even THINK about shims!  I will give them a shout.  Again.  Stupid Tax for me: Extra shipping charges!   

Thats why this place is great: Get in on the KNOW before its GO !

 

Wild_Willie posted:
jwdlm posted:

The cross bolt safety on the 1895 is nice for allowing dry firing and I use the o'ring method to prevent it from being engaged. There are several good videos on slicking up the Marlin 336 action that I used for doing my 1895 when I added the Ranger Point lever. I used several of their shims on the lever which also made a big improvement. If you pull the bolt and re-install the lever you'll see where it can make contact with the receiver when side pressure is applied. The guys at Ranger Point Precision are super helpful if you have questions and I really like their products.

I just ordered their lightened medium loop lever...  Dammit, didn't even THINK about shims!  I will give them a shout.  Again.  Stupid Tax for me: Extra shipping charges!   

Thats why this place is great: Get in on the KNOW before its GO !

 

Get their thumb screw too! makes it so easy to take apart and clean in the field.

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