Wanting a lightweight/backpacking stove set-up. Don't really need one, but kinda want one.Big Grin

Snowpeak has a GigaPower stove, a M700 pot/cup, and a spork as a 'starter kit', and I've been eyeballing it for a minute.Here at REI

How does the Giga stove line compare to the MSR line? Do the MSR stoves nest well in the Snowpeak Ti pot sets? Titanium has a pretty high 'gee-whiz' factor, but I'm also not absolutely wedded to Ti cookware, so a SS set-up that works with the MSR stoves is not out of the question either. I'm not looking for absolute ultralight, useability is a much higher priority.

MSR seems to be the standard, so I'm leaning towards just parting a kit together and using a MSR, but was curious about the Snowpeak line-up.

Thoughts and comments appreciated.

Thanks folks.

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

Original Post
I've heard good things about Snowpeak in civvy bushwalking circles.
Never got my wanking spanners on it to have a good look myself, I just followed the herd with an MSR Whisperlite Internationale personally.

=======================
Forward!
Where we are, where we belong, where we should be.

  

Location: Back in Bris-Vegas, wondering at the bright lights of the big smoke

quote:
Originally posted by DocCaliz:
Jetboil


This!

If you're going ultralight, then you're pretty much resorting to just boiling water for freeze dried meals and a brew.
yeah, they are slightly heavier than some other options (MSR Pocket Rocket, Snowpeak Gigapower)
but the All In One setup makes things super easy.

Steve ____________________________________________ To err is human but to Arrrrrr Is Pirate

Hadn't even considered the JetBoil system Doc. I'll have to check it out. Your review there is awful convincing.

Mick, I hear ya. I figured everybody was using the MSR, so it must not suck too much. Big Grin

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

I'm about to take an MSR XGK-EX + 475ml Stowaway pot the length of the Bibbulmun Track. Cost $150 on Aus Ebay, a considerable saving.

For light weight, small size, fast boiling, and fuel versatility, you'd be hard-pressed to find better. It's fine for boiing, I doubt that you could simmer with it.

The Ti pots are just too expensive for me. Only (minor) prob with the stove is that the hose tends to get in the way when packing. Mind you, it's an armoured hose; who wants a split hose in the middle of nowhere?
I have an MSR and love it.

http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/...pocketrocket/product

It comes with a plastic case (triangular shaped about 2 inches wide and 4 inches tall) to keep it in so you dont crush it in your pack or get it dirty when not in use. I usually use it to boil water (16oz only takes a few minutes at the most) to make mountain house meals or coffee. I was surprised at how quickly the stove cools down after your done using it.

The reason i went with the MSR over all the rest was i could find a parts kit for it locally at gander mountain.

I cant say much about the pot. I just use an old school stainless steel pot with a pan/lid or an old canteen cup to cook with. Food sticks to the steel but i use sand or gravel to clean it like a brillo pad and it works well. I dont really see the need to buy the titanium ultra light stuff when there are plenty of good stainless steel pots/pans/cups that are durable and cheap. I got my canteen cup for $5 and it does everything i need when using my stove. If i make something out of a can i just use the can to heat it up, but more often than not i just take mountain house meals or something similar to save size and weight and for their convenience.

A bit of advice. If your going some place windy take some tinfoil along to make a wind shield with. I haven’t had my stove blow out but it does blow the flame around and makes it harder to get something to heat up.
I should have put this in the OP (Sailor Jerry and coherent thoughts are sometimes mutually exclusiveBig Grin), but I'd really like a cooking system that nests in itself (or that I can get to nest) to save space in my pack (Eagle AIII-MOLLE or PPM MAP). That Jetboil system is looking pretty righteous. Another reason I was looking at the Snowpeak set-up, was the ability to add other cookware (larger pot/frying pan/coffee cup), and have it all fit comfortably together.

My intended usage is overnight up to a couple days out-of-doors, and emergency prep/BOB type stuff, so ultralight isn't as much of an issue as durability and useability. Yeah, I generally use some of my emergency prep gear for camping activities (replace as needed), just so I can work out the kinks before I might need it. I don't anticipate using it for more than a few days up to a week, since my preps tend to focus more on tornado/bad weather/3day evac than on the Zombie Apocolypse.

With the cartridge stoves, are the cartridges interchangeable? Just dawned on me. *facepam* Seems they are, but want to make sure.

Thanks for the advice so far guys.

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

Seen a stove reviewed (need to find the magazine) that uses basically anything for fuel. Not as quick as a jetboil, but you can stuff leaves or twigs in there and it'll do a pretty decent job apparently.

It was in F&S i think......gonna have to find the magazine. Looked like a nice emergency alternative.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So low speed, i'm in Park.

"I could stand to hear a little more.." Jayne

Training is brief. Death is forever. PAY ATTENTION.

Joined: 6/14/03 1:02 PM

quote:
Originally posted by k_randomfactor:
With the cartridge stoves, are the cartridges interchangeable? Just dawned on me. *facepam* Seems they are, but want to make sure.


Pretty much. MSR, Jetboil, etc. all use interchangeable cartridges that use 20% propane (burns hotter in cold temps) and 80% isobutane (pressurizes better as the canister empties). If these are used for an BOB/Emergency kit, they recommend that you only keep them in storage for up to 3 years since the o-rings can degrade. That just gives you an excuse to use and rotate them more often. Wink

I've had friends say that they had problems with their Jetboils, but I didn't ask for details since I wasn't in the market for a cartridge stove at the time. YMMV

Like Mick, I have the MSR Whisperlite International and couldn't be happier. It's 20+ years old and worked at 14k ft altitude in Peru and a BUNCH here in the state.

I'm a brand loyalty junky so if I were to get a cartridge stove, I would go for MSR. If you want an all-in-one unit like the Jetboil, the MSR Reactor looks like a solid, but pricey choice. Like the Jetboil, you can't really use other cookwear, since it's a "system".

If you do want to use a cartridge and other cookwear but you aren't going for ultralight, The MSR Windpro looks like a pretty good choice.

Tenui Nec Dimittam

 

"Ideals are peaceful.  History is violent"   -Wardaddy, Fury

 

Joined: 8/5/07         Location: Chester County, PA

Another vote for the JB, which they now make a Ti version.

I will say if and when I need a liquid fuel stove it will be one of the MSR that burns anything.

One thing you could try, Maxpedition makes a 12x5 I think is the size bottle holder. Girl on you tube reviews all sorts of outdoor gear, hold her JB and extras in one of these. I'll finder her YT vid for this.
I have ab MSR Dragonfly and I love it. It's durable, adjustable so you can actually do more than just boil water with it, and it runs on just about any fuel you can get your hands on (perfect for your BOB scenario). The rebuild kits for the MSR stoves are also readily available at any good outdoor store. As an added bonus they are on sale at REI right now for $90 ($40 off). I have included the link below.

I was tempted by the Ti cookware, but after using a friend's on a backpacking trip I decided to go with SS and bought an MSR setup that nests together. It's a little heavier than the Ti stuff but you can actually cook bacon and eggs in it.

http://www.rei.com/product/709...ly-backpacking-stove
Wow, something I've got a bit of experience with. As an alpinist, backcountry ranger and umm ex-REI employee, whether personally owned or gov. issued, I've used about all of the systems out there. On my last trip to Laos, I cooked over a campfire for 2 weeks. That,in reality sucks balls. Over the last 15 years, I've trimmed back and given away about all of my blackened mound of cooking gear away. I'll mention what I've got left and why.

Like posters above have said, it kinda matters what you want to do with the stove. For long and committing backcountry trips, winter or summer, where you're already carrying a bunch of crap already, I go with a white gas stove. Esp with more than two people. Esp with TEOTWAWKI Eek. The MSR Whisperlight International and Dragonfly are my choices. They're field maintainable (important) and simple. You can take the entire thing apart and clean the Indonesian kerosene sludge out if you need to. Most of them also actually cook, ie. simmer or blast. That's what these things are made for. They will also run just about any shitty fuel out there. These don't nest in pots too well but you can always stuff other crap in them. I've had a set of the REI brand ti cookware that they will fit into. Those things are still going strong 10 years deep.

For short 1 or 2 night trips I use a nesting canister stove. Look above at HUSSAR's post about the differences and limitations of canister fuel. The only ones that are proprietary are the light blue euro Camping Gaz canisters so don't go getting any of those. Otherwise you can find isopropane at Walmart.

2 things to consider with these: they are NOT field maintainable, meaning if they go down, you go hungry. I had a snow cave collapse once, dumping a pile of fluff onto my old Ti Gigipower. That thing took days to dry out and work again. The other limitation is that most of these are designed with a mountaineer's needs in mind - namely they're made for boiling water and melting snow. This means max heat output and efficiency. What this looks like for actually cooking food is a tightly focused laser beam of a flame that will be scorching the center of your pot while leaving the periphery ice cold. Ask for a demo at the store.

For solo overnight backpacking trips I use an MSR Superfly since it's small (unscrew the flame spreader) and cooks well (flame spreader). It also nests within the .85 L MSR titan ti kettle with a full size cartridge. This is smaller than the Jetboil system too. It can run the blue euro cans as well. It's also easy to rig a hanging system if you need to for some reason.

For ultra lightweight mountaineering trips where the measure of success is either pass or fail, I use either the MSR Pocketrocket or the Giga. Again, I'm only eating Gu and melting snow for water and tea. Not to sound dramatic but if the stove goes down, you go down (downhill, not DRT I hope).

The Jetboil and MSR Reactor systems are sexy and def. have their place within the general limitations of canister stoves. They have windscreens built in but I'm not entirely sold on the utility of the heat exchanger concept. We got some for our SAR program and they do get used a ton. Some of the models are - as above - are pretty much made to boil water only. The ones made for cooking are kind of big and I'd just as well rather go with a separate pot and stove.

One last thing, titanium isn't the end all be all. It doesn't hold heat for shit and dents easily. Being made of surplus Com Bloc munitiuns, it is light though. I've found the anodized aluminum stuff (like this) to be awesome, lightweight, reasonably non-stick and pretty bombproof. This stuff is my car camping, heavy duty gear of choice.

Hope that helps some,

EDIT: Some of our sponsors might sell some of this stuff - F REI (and the minimum wage they paid me), look to these guys first.

SPF

 

"No hope gives me guts." D. Boon

Some good info Palacial.

I still have my big pile of blackened stoves and just can't get rid of them.

I have both a whisperlite intl and MSR XGK that I have dedicated to heavy camping or heavy survival. By heavy I mean that I can carry a little more weight because the time frame is going to be extended and I am going to be needing resupply from resources that I have not established before hand. These are the stoves that would be pulled from for a disaster trip or another deployment to some place that I couldnt get gas canisters. Positives is that I can use just about any liquid fuel I can allocate with the biggest differences being in efficiency/time and soot output. Down side is that they are heavy, they do take a little bit of effort to learn the function, and I feel like I have to watch them a bit more when using them. I run this with a snowpeak 700 mug and the MSR alpine two pot set I got nearly 20 years ago when in Scouts.

I also have a jetboil. I love my jetboil. This is the stove system that I use when I go to classes. I use this to boil water for mountain house meals (what I usually eat at classes), hot chocolate, and occasionally tea. It boils water fast and I dont feel the need to watch it very closely. I will often start it up and step away to do something not being to concerned with it tipping over or doing something unexpected. Just before I got mine I went on a camping trip with a buddy of mine. The plan was to trade of making meals. I brought a large two burner stove as we were car camping, he brought his jetboil with the frying pan. He fixed breakfast the second day and did an awesome meal of sauteed onions, mushrooms, bacon, etc and poured in eggs at the end, wait till eggs were done. That shit was delicious and really surprised me as to what could be done on a jetboil, even with the extra frying pan. Also, my set came with a pot support that slips on in place of the jetboil mug and I have used my snowpeak 700 mug on that without issue. Some users I know have complained of the striker going out. I have had mine for a number of years and have not had this problem. It has been used in all seasons and most weather types without issue. I do however keep a lighter with me when using it. This is the system that gets the most use out of my stove arsenal.


My next setup is my bug out bag setup which includes a snow peak ti mini solo combo kit. The cooking portion is an esbit stove and a small alcohol stove with remote fuel source. This is very minimalist but is what I like for the concept of a BOB. Alcohol stoves are quiet and give of less odor. I use the esbit stove frame to support the pot as the alcohol stove has no integrated frame. Should I run out of alcohol (I use everclear grain alcohol as it is multipurpose) I can use the esbit frame by itself with organic materials, this does take some mindful attention as the esbit frame is intended to be used with solid fuel cubes so using organic fuel requires constant tending with matchstick size fuel. I can nestle the esbit stove, two bottles of fuel, and the alcohol stove inside the mini solo main pot and it slides into a small stuff sack with an aluminum wind screen around it. I keep rubber bands on it to knock down the rattle and have woven 550 cord on the lid tab to make it cool to pick up when cooking. With this system I am more worried about finding food than knowing I can make my stove work when operating outside of the time frame of gear carried on my back. With that being said this is setup requires the most attention when cooking of any listed above. I have very much sacrificed ease of use for lightweight, compact, and multipurpose.


If I were to own only one it would likely be a modern MSR XGK (the EX model, mine is the older model) or the MSR Dragonfly. Both will run a variety of fuels and are fairly heavy duty. Spend some time learning how to maintain them and set them up from stuff sack to boiling water. Couple that with a either a MSR stainless or snowpeak ti multi pot cook kit and scale it to the trip and you should be good for the widest variety of destination. It wont be super light but it will be dependable and you will likely be able to find fuel most anywhere.
I have to second what Palacial said as well.

The MSR Wisperlite and Dragon Fly are very good stoves and the plus is they work with just about any flammable liquid.
I also have the Snow Peak Ti cook stuff.

All of this stuff has survived 30 day unsupported treck's in the Canadian Arctic. My Wisperlite is over 20 years old now and I have only needed to rebuild it once. I still never head out without a rebuild kit though. The newer MSR fuel valves are a lot better than the old ones. Both of these stoves have worked well for me from sea level to 14,000 foot range in all weather conditions.

Om the TI cook sets, they do not distribute the heat as well as Al or stainless, but the weight trade off is worth it for some pieces. I still use a Al frying pan for this reason, as it is a lot easier to cook some meals with. The Ti cook wear also does not hold heat as well as Al or stainless, which kinda sucks for big meals.
I'm considering that snow peak starter set to replace my DIY alcohol stove and ss mug for my day hiking/ghb. Does the 700 mug fit a nalgene 1L in it? How does the snowpeak canister compare in size to the jetboil canister? Would a jet boil canister fit in the 700 mug?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

"Chance favors the prepared mind" Louis Pasteur 1854

Thanks Mike, No body around here sells the snowpeak canisters but jet boil is in abundance. figured it would work fine but needed to make sure.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

"Chance favors the prepared mind" Louis Pasteur 1854

My little brain is starting to hurt.Wink

I think I've made my choice... I'm probably gonna end up with a couple of them.Big Grin

#1 or 2 - The Snowpeak Starter set. Lightweight and compact is in-line with I'm looking for.
#2 or 1 - Jetboil - The all-in-one modular system really appeals. DocCaliz' review was pretty convincing.

I'll get one or the other first. I have a locally owned hippy-dippy backpacking store (where the employees eat massive amounts of Q. Odd, but kinda cool) down the road, and they carry both of those. Probably come down to which one they have in stock at the time, and how much scratch I have on hand. I like to shop locally when I can, so I'll go there.

#3 - One of those MSR multi-fuel jobbers. Probably way more than I'll need, but they're just cool as hell. The ability to burn pretty much anything, and the fact that it is field maintainable is a big plus.

I also have a DIY popcan alcohol stove, and a Nimblewill Stove on the block as projects. One and/or both of these will stay in my bushcrafting/secondary camping bag as well.

Way more stuff than I really need in all actuality, but '2 is 1, and 1 is none' right? (Can I rationalize or what?)

Thanks for the education, and the recommendations, guys.I can always count on y'all to help me spend money.

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

A little late but I've been rocking a MSR Superfly for a couple years and I love it. I've never used a jetboil but I've heard great things about them.

The superfly is very lightweight and small to pack. I think a can of fuel has 2.5hrs of burn time which isn't too bad for an overnight trip or 2. Easy to clean too.

----

 

Ditch Medic

Joined: October 2009

Location: Washington State

quote:
Originally posted by crazypaulie:
I think a can of fuel has 2.5hrs of burn time which isn't too bad for an overnight trip or 2. Easy to clean too.


Do you get that from oneof the small bottles, or the larger one?

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

Have any of you guys tried the alcohol fuel packets which have replaced the old trioxane fuel tablets? I have never used them but I have seen them on the internet. Expensive as hell.

We used to get big boxes of the fuel tablets with MREs some 20 years ago. I had a bunch, still have a few, and except for the smell, I really liked them for a quick boil up for coffee, tea, oatmeal.

I used to use a stove I bought at a camping store- it was some kind of sterno type alcohol in a can with a screw off top. A bigger cylinder tube of metal with two removable cross pieces formed a stand across the top of the cylinder on which a metal cup which fit my nalgene bottle rested quite nicely. Kept out of the wind, it was a quick, cheap, and easy way to heat up a morning coffee and oatmeal.

"An unarmed man can only flee from evil, and evil is not overcome by fleeing from it." Jeff Cooper

"...Every so often one of those peaceful, compassionate liberals drops the mask and gives us a peek into his soul. It is ugly in there, fellas. If you doubt the need for an AR, you haven't looked inside the mind of a liberal yet...."

I have a couple of Jetboils that I use for traveling in CONUS that have served me well. For short term use like say a week or less I find that their simplicity is hard to beat. I have the frying pan and other stuff for mine though I mostly use just the cup. Yes the cup does suck to cook real food in but for backpacking it's easier to roll with freeze dried meals.

The ability to cook using multiple fuels sounds pretty cool but unless you are in countries which don't give you access to traditional fuels how much of a need is that? (I do rock an MSR multifuel stove OCONUS but I always have access to lots of JP-8 which burns sooty and amells nasty but it works)

If you are worried about long term survival I'd invest in a decent dutch oven and cast iron cookware. You can then learn some skills for cooking over a real fire and go all primitive when the fuel runs out. That's not really a concern of mine but it is fun to cook over a fire when it's convenient not when you have to.
If you're looking at Jetboil, do yourself a favor and look at the Primus EtaSolo. Primus has been making stoves for a LONG time, and was making the Jetboil under contract; they went to Jetboil with a list of suggested improvements and were told to get bent. When the contract ended, they started making the EtaSolo. It's lighter, faster, and comes with some parts that make it more versatile right out of the box.

"Rule #1: Use your good judgment in all situations. There will be no additional rules." - Nordstrom's Employee Handbook

quote:
Originally posted by geronimo:
If you are worried about long term survival I'd invest in a decent dutch oven and cast iron cookware. You can then learn some skills for cooking over a real fire and go all primitive when the fuel runs out. That's not really a concern of mine but it is fun to cook over a fire when it's convenient not when you have to.


On my to-do list, not cuz I have to, or really seriously think I'll have/be able to pull a Nessmuk, but because it's a skill I'm pretty shitty at and want to get better, and it'll be fun.

And I said pretty much the same thing to one of our EnZedd friends when he was talking about a long haul walkabout.

I'm, at this point, looking for a 3-7 day solution in case I have to evac due to weather/natural disaster, or to use while out playing in the woods for a day or two. The MSR multi-fuel jobs are really more of a gee whiz than anything (I don't need one, I want oneWink). If the Zombie Apocolypse comes I'm pretty fucked regardless, so any longer than a few days to a week is far later in the planning. 'Long term' (weeks and months) is way beyond what I'm thinking at this point. I'll end up brains d'hoevres I guess.Big Grin

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

quote:
If you are worried about long term survival I'd invest in a decent dutch oven and cast iron cookware. You can then learn some skills for cooking over a real fire and go all primitive when the fuel runs out. That's not really a concern of mine but it is fun to cook over a fire when it's convenient not when you have to.



Yes, I almost mentioned dutch ovens initially but thought K was looking for more lightweight options. I really like dutch oven cooking and until we moved I had a small area setup off our deck to cook on coals. I am working on a fire pit here at the new house so I can do the same. Cooking on a fire just takes practice and a little bit of learning how to read temp by feel (basically how long you can hold your hand 6-8" off the coals), the architecture of a good fire pit for cooking (I prefer keywhole shape) and how to maintain an adequate supply of coals with wood. Using charcoal makes this a lot easier.

If I could cook in a 'summer' kitchen (read outside) all the time I would. Even with our nice new house I havent gotten to that point but hope to one day.

I will close with this, the dutch oven (with raised legs and lipped lid) is probably the single most multipurpose cooking item I have and if I were choosing a single cooking item to put in a vehicle or bug out/in location it would be my standard 12" lodge dutch oven.
quote:
Originally posted by k_randomfactor:

Do you get that from oneof the small bottles, or the larger one?


I thought for sure my canister said that (the 8oz) but after checking their site the specs say 60min...

I'd look for you but it has already left for the 'stan.

----

 

Ditch Medic

Joined: October 2009

Location: Washington State

Excuses excuses. Wink

No worries. I can check next time I'm at the store, but that sounded longer than I remembered. Stay safe over yonder dude.

Mike, I am indeed looking, for the moment at least, lighter weight options than a cast iron dutch oven and skillet. Though those are on the list at some point, they'll be used more for fun, 'check this shit out', cookery initially.

I've read some of the turn of the 20th century outdoors writers, and the amount of shit they carried is ridiculous. I'm nowhere near as hearty as those fuckers. JetBoil and a Thermarest is where it is gonna be at.Big Grin

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

Definitely. I refuse to hike a dutch oven, at a minimum that is a job for a pack mule or hike into a remote facility ONCE and leave it there as a hard item for that facility.

In regards to adventurers of days gone past, it is amazing the adversity both from the environment and available equipment that those people dealt with. Puts things into perspective.

ETA: We often choose to do things as an 'activity' where they often did things out of necessity for survival.
They were some hard fuckers way back then but it's because they had to be. I'm sure if you gave any of those guys a choice between a Jetboil and a cast iron skillet they would take the Jetboil 10 out of 10 times.

I'm all about the Cast iron shit at the house since it's a great item for now and if things ever suck but you have to figure out how to work with it just like anything else.
quote:
Originally posted by MrMurphy:
Seen a stove reviewed (need to find the magazine) that uses basically anything for fuel. Not as quick as a jetboil, but you can stuff leaves or twigs in there and it'll do a pretty decent job apparently.

It was in F&S i think......gonna have to find the magazine. Looked like a nice emergency alternative.


The Biolite Stove. Still awaiting production.

"The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools." - Thucydides

 

Joined: 7/30/03         Location: Appalachia

quote:
Originally posted by Big Jake:
If you're looking at Jetboil, do yourself a favor and look at the Primus EtaSolo. Primus has been making stoves for a LONG time, and was making the Jetboil under contract; they went to Jetboil with a list of suggested improvements and were told to get bent. When the contract ended, they started making the EtaSolo. It's lighter, faster, and comes with some parts that make it more versatile right out of the box.


+1 for EtaSolo, I had one for a while, it comes with many accessories JB sells separate included in the kit.

We dropped them until the whole patent dispute gets resolved (JB was suing Primus last I heard).

Last I checked OPT has a couple in stock still at about as close to wholesale I could mark them.

I use the New JB Sol Ti now, it dropped some weight and the pot is smaller, I never seemed to need everything the regular JB pushed out, so the compact size and less weight made sense to me, my experience with it is limited, I just got it.

If you want a deal on the Primus: HERE

Snow Peak cookware is top notch, I highly recommend any of their stuff, and MSR stoves as said earlier are like fucking Sherman tanks when it comes to backwoods cooking, I don't sell them but they work very well, and that is what counts.
quote:
Originally posted by palacial:
For long and committing backcountry trips, winter or summer, where you're already carrying a bunch of crap already, I go with a white gas stove. Esp with more than two people. Esp with TEOTWAWKI Eek. The MSR Whisperlight International and Dragonfly are my choices. They're field maintainable (important) and simple. You can take the entire thing apart and clean the Indonesian kerosene sludge out if you need to. Most of them also actually cook, ie. simmer or blast.


Pretty much nails it. I am on my second MSR Whisperlite in 20 yrs and its still my go to stove.

" We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. " -George Orwell Celer, Silens, Mortalitas "Swift, Silent, Deadly"

For what it's worth:

I have a number of different camping/backpacking stoves. My experience in a nutshell:

Canister stoves:
Pros
- Pack up small and light
- Typically efficient and have quick boils times in warm weather.
- Ability to control heat output.
- Pressurized canister simplifies startup

Cons
- Become less efficient/slower to boil as temperature drops; not great in temps less than 40 degrees
- Fuel canister availability

Notes - MSR, Jetboil, and SnowPeak canisters are interchangable. Brunton canisters, as well as some others may have a different sized nipple and threading. Be sure you know what will work with your stove.


White gas stoves:
Pros
- Reliable operation regardless of ambient temperature
- Fuel (white gas/Coleman fuel)is relatively easy to find
- Capable of reasonably quick boil times
- Ability to control heat output.
- Multi-fuel models availble allowing the use of other liquid fuels

Cons
- Stove + fuel usually not as light or as compact as canister stove setup; heavier, or just heavy.
- Some models need to be primed/pumped/pressurized prior to lighting


Wood burning stoves:
Pros
- Lightweight and/or compact (mine are, anyways)
- Fuel can be procured on the trail or at the campsite (usually; fuel availability may vary depending on location)
- Forced-air models have decently fast boil times
- Minimal maintenance required

Cons
- Will turn pots black, which will turn your other stuff black unless you have a separate bag for your pot.
- Starting can be slow
- Operation can be hampered by wet conditions
- Slow boils times for non-forced air models (hobo stove)
- Requires constant attention (feeding fuel, monitoring live fire)

Notes
- Heat can be regulated by fuel load.


Alcohol stoves:
This is another option, but I don't have enough 'field' experience with this setup to give a good assessment. An alcohol stove is hands-down the simplest setup, but I have found mine to be slow to boil, and not uber-efficient. Fuel can be found at any hardware store.



I don't own a MSR Whisperlite International, but I think it is probably one of the most versatile options as far as liquid fuel stoves go.


I have a Jetboil, and love it for warm weather use. I have found Snowpeak canister work the best and last the longest, followed by MSR canisters.

My favorite wood/debris burner or hobo stove is the folding Pocket Cooker. Not the lightest thing in the world, but it packs down reasonably small.

My all-season go-to stove is a Optimus Svea 123R. It fits into a SnowPeak Trek700 pot, but it sticks out the top maybe 0.25" It isn't the lightest stove setup (I carry an additional small fuel bottle for lighting/priming the stove), and it isn't very versatile (white gas only). But it has been reliable, and it's just fun, too (flames and noisy).


Pocket Cooker:


123R:

Intro post on page 225 of intro thread; posted on 10 June 2011 11:09. One does not need to be sick in order to get better.
Just picked up my Jetboil Flash. Tired of being the only one eating cold chef boy-ar-dont out of the can at classes, the range, or camping. Have my other stoves for the Mt Washington trips, but you can't beat the Jetboils for convienence of packing. Bought from EMS, 20%off sale runs until today I think

De inimico non loquaris sed cogites.

Chris, if I make it to the shoot (currently anticipate being there), I'll bring my Jetboil Helios for you to check out.

------------------------------------ Aaron "Because you pick your side and you stick. You don't cut and run when things get ugly. Otherwise you'll never have anything. No love. No family. No life to call your own." For some men die by shrapnel, And some go down in flames. But most men perish inch by inch In play at little games. -C.T. Studd

The MSR Reactor solves the issue of cold weather affecting the fuel consumption rate for the canisters. I used mine this past winter on a trip and it blew away the Jetboil.
My old JB rides in my truck kit with a couple meals and fuel cells. Also rides along on road trips to make coffee...
I have to parrot other posts that nailed the info on the liquid fuel MSR stoves....years ago I personally witnessed a solid fuel line model XGK that was probably already 15 years old run on 10W30 as a torture test. If the liquid will burn, an MSR stove can likely run on it if you know how to prep the simple design. My WL is going on 20 years and has only been "rebuilt" once. If I am only grabbing one stove, it's my Whisperlite.

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Longeye
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