Zen stoves is an excellent source for info on stoves, fuel effeciency, pros and cons of stove types,and alot more, includng info on alcohol and wood stoves.
Fwiw, I use an alcohol stove for short hikes in good weather, have a butane canister stove for colder weather hikes (short duration) and coleman dual fuel stoves for family bug out.
If you want the ultimate in lightweight, go alcohol. I know the guy who designed this stove. Its really, really light and its something that you can make at home. He's really into the whole ultralight backpacking and he uses alcohol stoves a lot (although he does collect Svea 123 stoves).

"Be a man of principle. Fight for what you believe in. Keep your word. Live with integrity. Be brave. Believe in something bigger than yourself. Serve your country. Teach. Mentor. Give something back to society.  Lead from the front. Conquer your fears. Be a good friend. Appreciate your friends and family. Be a leader and not a follower. Be valorous on the field of battle. And take responsibility for your actions."
Major Douglas A. Zembiec, USMC

http://www.mkettle.com/

This is the one i saw reviewed in a hunting mag.

Anyone used one? Looks like an interesting concept.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So low speed, i'm in Park.

"I could stand to hear a little more.." Jayne

Training is brief. Death is forever. PAY ATTENTION.

Joined: 6/14/03 1:02 PM

I ended up getting the snowpeak starter kit from Amazon since iget free prime shipping with my student email. It pretty great! Doesn't boil as fast as the jetboil but it is very light, compact and bundles together well. My intention was to replace the alcohol stove in my GHB/ dayhike bag that keep in my truck. The main reason I replaced my stove was 2nd to evaporation. Even if I thought I tightened the lid enough after a month or two in the summer my fuel evaporated. That as we all know that is "no bueno". And It didn't cost me much space in my pack either. Since I replaced my SS cup and nested my nalgeene in the cup. The stove is about the size of the fuel bottle I carried before and the canister isn't very big. So I don't feel I gave up much but I gained alot of functionality. Bolo the studboard for a review.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

"Chance favors the prepared mind" Louis Pasteur 1854

I just recently retired a Coleman Apex II multi fuel stove...after 8 years of use. The only reason is the steel braided fuel line started to leak around the crimped fittings. I plan on fixing it, but for now it sits.

I spent a couple of weeks researching back packing stoves and finally narrowed down my choice to the Optimus Nova. It's multi fuel compatible, the pump is made of metal parts(unlike MSR's) and it pack really small. I have only camped with it twice, but it's worked great using unleaded gas @ 7300ft. The only downside it that it sounds like a F-16 at full afterburner.

If you know that you will always have a readily available supply of fuel canisters get the Jetboil or Primus. If you are unsure what fuel source you may have, go with a multi fuel stove. I bought the Optimus, but there are a lot of good multi fuel stoves on the market right now.
I have used msr whisper lights for 15 years in and out of the service. You can get smaller, lighter and more convenient stoves but I love the idea of no special fuel canisters and burning any kind of gas you can find.

My original is still giving good service. Bought one for my brother. Have a new one I in my truck for the winters.

They just work.

_______________________ Front Toward Enemy

quote:
If I were to own only one it would likely be a modern MSR XGK....find fuel most anywhere.


A little late on the input here. All great advice. Have had the MSR XGK since - forever - got one after Vietnam and spent 20+ years with me in the active Guard and Reserve, had this around to heat the water, C rats, and later MRE stuff. JP4 was always there! Make sure you use the right jet for the fuel, get a repair kit for spares (never needed, but...), and a zip lock bag (large) to put the sucker in to cart along or back home if use use diesel.
Been a great stove. New ones come with a bigger pot for storage. Mine is the old style with the 'almost' 2 cup aluminum cup.
Now it's with my BOB.

“Denial kills you twice. It kills you once, at your moment of truth when you are not physically prepared: You didn’t bring your gun. You didn’t train. You’re only defense was wishful thinking. Hope is not a strategy. Denial kills you a second time because even if you do physically survive, you are psychologically shattered by fear, helplessness, horror, and shame at your moment of truth.” - Lt. Col. Dave Grossman

Knowledge is Good- Emil Faber

I too run a jetboil, makes for a very good system.

-------------------------------- Freedom - Isn't Free My only worry about death is that my wife will sell my gear for what I SAID I paid for it..... My greatest worry about life - is that she'll find out what I did pay for it.....

Jetboil. Infact, I need to unpack mine from moving, and put it back in my car. Its a life saver for a fast cup of tea when its ass cold on a call out, etc. I made that killer meal for Mike on the stove on their extension set of fry pans and bigger pots. Sure, its more pieces, but you can go from basic water boiling/food in bag, to full on meals pretty easy; and doing eggs, cured meats/normal back country packed in foods is super easy, and super fast to clean up since the stuff is non stick. I'd even venture to argue you could do some modified baked goods in the pot with some experimentation.

The obstacle is the path. --Zen Proverb

Hanging out at a friends last night that I backpack with often, he broke out his new Soto Muka. Impressive!! I'm going to see how it works on our trips over the next few months to see if its worth picking one up. Loved the pump, very smooth. I love the fact it requires zero priming. The only downside is it doesn't burn kerosene. I should probably mention, I have never burned kerosene. Big Grin

Soto Muka Stove

" We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. " -George Orwell Celer, Silens, Mortalitas "Swift, Silent, Deadly"

Here is what I put together. Nothing as high tec/fancy as a Jet boil but fairly light.

Here is it all packed up -



Unpacked -



We have:
(1) Nalgene water bottle
(1) Sea To Summit aluminum spoon
(3) Esbit Heat Tabs
(1) "Stove"
(1) Snow Peak Ti Mini Solo Cup, Pot, & Lid
(2) Rods for the pot/cup to sit on
(1) Mesh bag

Set up to cook -



It packs up like this:



And then the bottle slides in -



And it weighs in at -



Granted you can do more with the Jet Boils as they will take a frying pan and stuff but for boiling water or heating something up this is pretty light and doesn't have any moving parts/mechanisms to break.

If I ran out of fuel blocks I could use wood or whatever else will burn.

Joined: 3/27/09          Location: Back in MA for now

Thanks.

I forgot to add that weight is with an empty bottle, sorry if I mislead anyone regarding the weight.

Also, if anyone were to go about duplicating this be advised that the OD of Nalgene bottles varies. The colored ones are slightly larger and will not fit with the stove in the pot.

Joined: 3/27/09          Location: Back in MA for now

quote:
Originally posted by Blackwind:
Hanging out at a friends last night that I backpack with often, he broke out his new Soto Muka. Impressive!! I'm going to see how it works on our trips over the next few months to see if its worth picking one up. Loved the pump, very smooth. I love the fact it requires zero priming. The only downside is it doesn't burn kerosene. I should probably mention, I have never burned kerosene. Big Grin

Soto Muka Stove


Keep us updated... that thing looks tits!

 

----

"The thing everyone forgets about the Chinese is that they work on a 50-100 year master plan. Our best planning here goes out maybe a year or two."

I used a SP GigaPower and it works great. To loose weight though I have switched to a titanium Evernew alcohol stove setup. Slower boil time, but less weight in the end on long trips.

This thing puts out some flame:







Whole setup minus fuel in here:



I carry the fuel in a 20oz soda bottle with a special o-ringed lid.
An interesting related article showing the different stove slash fuel choices relative to weight and consumption. IIRC from some reading awhile back on a backpacking site, a user posted some nice graphs that showed that on multiple day trips alcohol stoves had a weight advantage over canister stoves. I believe some of his data was derived from the linked site.

http://www.howardjohnson.name/...ing/Stove/Stoves.htm

~~~ Don't look for conspiracy where incompetence is obvious! ~~~

 

 

I've got an MSR PR and for the price and size, it works great.

I've been making pop can stoves, too, and running them on Heet. Fun, but I need a better system for actually cooking on them.

Something I just started doing that made life easier is I made a 1"x3" pot holder out of a piece of silicon.

*********************** You don't drown by falling in the water; you drown by staying there. Deeds, not words.

quote:
To loose weight though I have switched to a titanium Evernew alcohol stove setup. Slower boil time, but less weight in the end on long trips.


jinx667,

How much fuel is required to heat up a Ti cup of water, and what is the wait time with that stove?

I've made a variety of alcohol penny stoves, and recently used a Tinney Bios stove on my last deploy, and love the utility. if that rig cooks faster, I'm converting.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

ALCON,

Learn from my mistake, and never, ever, no matter how many days you've been awake (3 for me at the time) shake your Jetboil upside down and right side up again while it is lit.

I'm lucky that the ensuing fireball was easily blown out, didn't melt the sleeve, and only took the hairs from my left hand, with no further injury.

My reasoning? Usually the Jetboil gets hot enough when you boil water that the residual heat evaporates the water traces in the cup. Well in this case, I had to kill the Jetboil before it got hot enough, and dumped the cold water. I thought it would be a good idea to just turn it on for a second to burn off the water. When it was lit, I vigorously tilted the Jetboil to get the water out (I was impatient). Suddenly a fireball was surrounding my hand and the Jetboil. I was able to blow it out with nothing aside from my pride injured. However, it could have been much worse.

Respect your tools, and respect the fire.

 

----

"The thing everyone forgets about the Chinese is that they work on a 50-100 year master plan. Our best planning here goes out maybe a year or two."

I grew up camping with a MSR Whisperlite Internationale. I still have my stove from Boy Scouts I bought back in 1996? 1997? and it works great, although i've pretty much retired it except for international trips.

The last few years, I've been using a MSR Pocket Rocket and Snow Peak 700 mug for nearly all my backcountry trips. The Pocket Rocket continues to function just fine at 14,000 feet and in subzero temperatures. Fuel canisters are easy enough to find, and i've never needed to clean it. Plug and play.

----------------------------
"Human endeavour is only to be judged by the spirit in which it is attempted." Eric Shipton - 1938

Alcohol stoves is where its at if you want to be ultra lightweight. This is my setup.

Alchy stove

Pot, this is the deep version, i have the shorter but wider verison

Bowl

Plastic blue spork from walmart ( I cut some of the handle off to fit inside my pot.

Bic lighter

5-8 oz denatured alcohol/91% rubbing alcohol/Heet (yellow bottle) or 71% rubbing alcohol(doesn't work the best)

Have not weighed it all in a long time, but I think its a little over half pound.
i use a MSR Whisperlite, its pretty lightweight if you dont take more fuel than you need, and is really reliable.

for when i dont need the whisperlite, i take the superfly. i used a torch and heated up the prongs and bent them to fit the curvature of my pot.

"Paperwork will ruin any military force." - Chesty Puller

Boadecia ,
Have you tried the big gallon cans of denatured alcohol they sell in the paint dept?
Way more effecient and cost effective than heet IMO
My .02 on a system for cooking w/ alcohol stoves...is that if you really want to "cook" get an MSR or Jetboil.If you're more worried about weight than taste, and are in awe of all the deliciousness that can be had by adding boiling water to things, alcohol rocks.
You are boiling water,not "cooking stuff"
Im not knocking you, I use alcohol stoves...on 3 season solo short trips.
My system is a penny stove variant.
-Stand is a disposable grill-grate folded lengthwise in thirds for rigidity
-cup is generic sierra style w/ outside painted black with black stove paint to absorb heat faster.
-lid is from large soup can.Yes, seriously, if you have one of the side cut can openers, try it.. it was a near perfect fit, and before anyone says a damned thing, its no more ghetto /hobo than making a stove from old soda cans
-Stove base/priming plate is bottom of same soup can.
-Windbreak is a disposable turkey pan that I flattened out.

30 mls of alcohol and about 5 minutes later, and I have enough boiling water for dinner and a small cup o' hot chocolate.
Hamburger helper singles or dehydrated soups premeasured into large large steamer bags.pour boiling water into steamer bag. Put steamer bag into large envelope made of heavy duty aluminum foil.let stand 5 minutes or so.
Eat out of bag, Mre style.cookware stays clean.
Cheap
Light
Simple
Sucks in cold weather or when cooking for groups.
I recently had the opportunity to borrow a friend's Bushbuddy Ultra for a trip and liked it enough that I think I'll end up picking one up for myself and the HH6. http://www.bushbuddy.ca/ If you're below or near the tree line, which I usually am, and excessive moisture isn't a problem, it isn't in many places, then it has a lot going for it.

God, country, family

I mentioned earlier in the thread how I only ran with a white gas stove, the MSR Whisperlite International in particular. After a recent backpacking trip with my son's Boy Scout troop, I'm warming up to canister stoves. After seeing how the other boys were all using them, I gave him an MSR Pocket Rocket (worst name ever for something to give a 12 year old boy ). It's very easy to use, packs small and doesn't produce the fireball that my white gas stove does.

If you are only using the stove to heat water for dehydrated food, consider using the GSI Halulite Ketalist. It makes heating water and measuring it super simple and packs well.

Tenui Nec Dimittam

 

"Ideals are peaceful.  History is violent"   -Wardaddy, Fury

 

Joined: 8/5/07         Location: Chester County, PA

quote:
Originally posted by Hussar:

If you are only using the stove to heat water for dehydrated food, consider using the GSI Halulite Ketalist. It makes heating water and measuring it super simple and packs well.


I picked up one of these when they were released, and the first time I used it (over an MSR pocket rocket), by the time the water got to boiling, the rubber on the handle and lid had softened up enough that my fingers were pushing divots into it. Upon cooling, the divots (complete with fingerprint) were permanent.

While it technically didn't affect the function of the kettle, it did little to inspire confidence in the product, and I promptly returned it to REI.

This was over a year ago. Have you seen any issues like that with yours?

 

----

"The thing everyone forgets about the Chinese is that they work on a 50-100 year master plan. Our best planning here goes out maybe a year or two."

Not yet, but it's been only been out for one weekend. I'll keep an eye on it and let you know.

Tenui Nec Dimittam

 

"Ideals are peaceful.  History is violent"   -Wardaddy, Fury

 

Joined: 8/5/07         Location: Chester County, PA

These are all great suggestions. I have several backpacking stoves, they kinda have a special place in my heart. Have a look at this.It is very cool and pretty self sufficient depending on your AO and it's level of available vegetation. They haven't been released yet but they are take reservation orders.

I have these and use all of these..

MSR Whisperlite
MSR Reactor
Snow Peak Gigapower
Coleman Peak1
Vargo Decagon

Do the hard thing.

 

EZGoingKev, I've got a setup very similar to yours. However, I was going to ditch the Nalgene bottle for a Platypus bag...just as durable but can be rolled up in a much more compact form.

The BioLite looks great...I'll have to wait for someone to review it once its for sale.

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