Lightweight stove and cookware questions.

quote:
Originally posted by CarbonCycles:
EZGoingKev, I've got a setup very similar to yours. However, I was going to ditch the Nalgene bottle for a Platypus bag...just as durable but can be rolled up in a much more compact form.

I have seen the bag type bottles and like how they roll up to take up less space. As I do not have any hands on experience with them I will have to take your word on them being as durable.

One thing with the Nalgene bottles is the large mouths on them makes them convenient to store other things in like rice, pasta, or anything else you might want to cook.

Joined: 3/27/09          Location: Back in MA for now

The large mouths also help to prevent freezing in colder conditions. I had one of the original narrow-mouthed Nalgenes on a Mt. Rainier hike and the water froze up in the neck. Everyone else had the large mouth bottles and didn't have that issue.
Any experience on Platypus bags in freezing conditions?
quote:
Originally posted by hmfg0331:
The large mouths also help to prevent freezing in colder conditions. I had one of the original narrow-mouthed Nalgenes on a Mt. Rainier hike and the water froze up in the neck. Everyone else had the large mouth bottles and didn't have that issue.
Any experience on Platypus bags in freezing conditions?

Did you carry them with the opening facing downwards?

Joined: 3/27/09          Location: Back in MA for now

In cold weather training they teach you to flip your canteens upside down.

Reason is they will start to freeze at the surface where the air gap is and work its way down. When they freeze at the bottom (which is now the top) the opening is clear and you can still drink.

Joined: 3/27/09          Location: Back in MA for now

quote:
Originally posted by Turbine 33:
johnnylaw

Did you know of the Biolite prior to my post? Reason I ask is that hardly anyone knows about it.



I got turned on to it by our friends at Soldier Systems:

http://soldiersystems.net/tag/biolite/

I'm looking forward to toasting marshmallows and charging my cell phone on my lunch break at work. I can see their faces now....

FRY MUMIA

"It's Never Too Early to Start Beefing Up Your Obituary"

Anybody ever have a problem with the igniter on their JetBoil?

I've had my JetBoil for 3~4 years now. It saw light use for the first few years - I'd use it maybe 6 or 7 times a year. Last fall (fall 2010) I began using the stove 4~5 days a week.

It worked fine all through the fall and winter of 2010/2011. This spring the igniter began to glitch. Sometimes the stove would light right off, other times it would take a dozen or more strikes to light, sometimes I just gave up and lit the stove with a Bic lighter.

Anyone else have a similar experience?

I am using JetBoil fuel, fwiw.

I also have a brass Svea 123 stove. That thing is mighty handy. Not as fast as the JetBoil, but it's Old School Cool and it always works perfectly.

______________________________________________________________________

Not to shit on anyone's riff here, but let me just see if I grasp this concept, ok? You're suggesting that we take some fucking parking shuttles, and reinforce them with some aluminum siding, and then just head on over to the gun store and watch our good friend Andy play some cowboy movie jump-on-the-covered-wagon bullshit. Then, we're gonna drive across a ruined city, through a welcome committee of a few hundred thousand dead cannibals, all so that we can sail off into the sunset on this fucking asshole's boat?

 

Yeah, pretty much.

 

Ok, I'm in.

Like everything else mission drives gear.
My background includes family camping (both car and backpacking in all 4 seasons), Boy Scouts, Seasonal Forest Service Worker (entirely backcountry work usually supported by horses), and now I guess you could say I am a member of the outdoor industry.

Over the years, I have used a lot of different stoves with different fuels. In the Scouts and FS the issue stoves where typically Coleman Peak1s and dutch ovens. Both are pretty dang industructable even with abuse.

At this point these are my preferences

Car Camping - Coleman 2 burner with a propane tank. Usually supplemented by a grill and cast iron for use over the fire and the wood stove in the tipi during colder weather.


Backcountry use:
I am a convert to tipi living and the use of wood stoves in inclement weather. For me it is not about surviving it is about living. As a result, the majority of my cooking in the backcountry is on a wood stove since it is already lit up morning and night for the most part. This is one of the reasons I don't like the jetboil design or others that require the use of a special container. You can't just thrown them on the wood stove or over a fire or on the personal stove you are carrying. They can only be used one way and for me it is all about multiple uses for a single item if at all possible. My favorite woodstove is the canister stove that we have do it yourself directions for on our HPG website. That thing flat out cranks like crazy, and there is no fiddling around getting it setup. Once you get it startd you just add wood and it gets cranking on its own. This last elk season I got to experience one of Ed Ts Backcountry rollup stoves (available from both Ed and Seekoutside). I was impressed with its ability to really crank without a lot of fiddling like the Kifaru stoves require, but it is fiddly to get setup. Incidently, Ed is the designer, with input from Patrick, and for a lot of years was the builder of the Kifaru stoves before handing off building to another gentleman in his area. I feel like the round shape of both of these stoves directs the coals into the correct place to really concentrate the heat and also the draft holes are in the correct location, low, to get a really good draw going. There are a few things I don't like about Ed's stove, but it would probably be my choice for a purchased stove at this point. If I wanted a traditional box stove then I would look at the ones produced by seekoutside. I haven't seen one going as it was 90 at the time, and I just wasn't interested in starting a fire in a stove at that point. However, it is very tightly fitted so it will have a more airtight firebox then the Kifaru stoves, which should make it draw better and be easier to get a good draft going. I state this based on the traditional shepards stoves I used 17 years ago in the FS, which where fitted like the seeksoutside stove and worked a lot better then the Kifaru stoves.

As for personal use or during the summer when the woodstove isn't along, I was a big pocket rocket guy for years as it was light quick and easy. I also didn't feel like the other stoves on the market were any better or you where constrained by special adapters for the pots and such (think jetboil). The thing that really bugged the crap out of me about the pocket rocket was never really knowing how much fuel I had left. I marked the canister for every use with a sharpie, but still ended up always carrying a back up canister and typically ended up with a whole bunch of partially used canisters at home. Then I got introduced to the trangia alcohol stove by my brother. I had previously tried a homemade alcohol stove, but wasn't impressed. However, the trangia fixed all my complaints with the other stove, and even improved on things. The first thing I like about it is that I can buy alcohol in bulk at any hardware stove, grocery stores, or by smaller containers at pretty much any convience store so fuel is not an issue to get at all and is super cheap. Second it is very easy to see how much fuel I have left in the stove and in the small spare bottles I am carrying making fuel management very easy. Unlike most alcohol stoves the trangia allows you to dampen the stove for simmering and also put it out. Most of the other ones I have seen or tried where full throttle until the fuel ran out so the trick was to pour in just enough fuel to heat or cook and no more otherwise you were wasting fuel. Due to these same features you can also carry fuel in the stove. The downside is that the trangia and the pot stand are a bit heavy, but that also means they are sturdy as hell and the trade off is worth it in my opinion. The one thing I have added is a windscreen made out of tinfoil which helps it get cranking. As has been pointed out the trangia is quiet and odorless. The other thing I like is you can start it with a spark from a striker or blast match or the like so you don't have to use up your matches or lighter getting your stove going. The only downside is that it takes a little bit for the stove to get going, but for my uses that isn't that big a deal as I am either taking a longish break on the trail or in camp so time isn't critical.

As to cookware I tend to be a one pot kind of guy for both cooking and then drinking warm beverages out of. I am now using a rei ti-ware pot because I really like the shape, but previously used a GSI soloist kit for a lot of years with no complaint. I am also looking at getting a GSI minimalist for my lightweight daypack when just a hot drink is the goal. For me cookware doesn't really mater. I choose it based on weight and shape. I also make sure that my stove will fit in it or it will fit over one of my water bottles so the space is not wasted. I only got the tiware pot because I had a dividend and it was on sale.

Co-Owner Hill People Gear

"If anything goes wrong it will be a fight to the end, if your training is good enough, survival is there; if not nature claims its foreit." - Dougal Haston

quote:
Originally posted by Dragon2Zero:
Anybody ever have a problem with the igniter on their JetBoil?

I've had my JetBoil for 3~4 years now. It saw light use for the first few years - I'd use it maybe 6 or 7 times a year. Last fall (fall 2010) I began using the stove 4~5 days a week.

It worked fine all through the fall and winter of 2010/2011. This spring the igniter began to glitch. Sometimes the stove would light right off, other times it would take a dozen or more strikes to light, sometimes I just gave up and lit the stove with a Bic lighter.

Anyone else have a similar experience?

I am using JetBoil fuel, fwiw.

I also have a brass Svea 123 stove. That thing is mighty handy. Not as fast as the JetBoil, but it's Old School Cool and it always works perfectly.


The ignitor is just something that suffers ware from use... Jetboil sells a cheap maintenance kit designed just for this issue. http://shop.jetboil.com/index....maintenance-kit.html

The obstacle is the path. --Zen Proverb

Well no shit - so simple.

I actually have the stove all apart right now & I was wondering if the igniter was available as a service part. It looks like the problem with mine is that the ceramic insulator is cracked. Sometimes this allows the spark to arc over to the metal ring that the cup locks into - instead of arcing at the burner.

Thanks Teckie!

______________________________________________________________________

Not to shit on anyone's riff here, but let me just see if I grasp this concept, ok? You're suggesting that we take some fucking parking shuttles, and reinforce them with some aluminum siding, and then just head on over to the gun store and watch our good friend Andy play some cowboy movie jump-on-the-covered-wagon bullshit. Then, we're gonna drive across a ruined city, through a welcome committee of a few hundred thousand dead cannibals, all so that we can sail off into the sunset on this fucking asshole's boat?

 

Yeah, pretty much.

 

Ok, I'm in.

I had the same issue with my jetboil like 2-3 years ago. The replaced it and my lid( mouse chewed it) under warrenty, even though I was well past the expiration. They sent me one no questions asked. Send them an email or give them a call I'm sure they will get you squared away. I bought the repair kit about a year ago and keep it with my other "repair" type items in my ruck. I don't even noticed it and haven't needed it yet.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

"Chance favors the prepared mind" Louis Pasteur 1854

quote:
Going to pick one of these up:
http://www.emberlit.com/


I liked that you can load the stove from the side. The video on the website is good if not a little long. He talked about how annoying it can be to constantly be pulling your pot off to fiddle with the fire. I could see that being an issue on the Biolite.

A Soldier without bullets is just a tourist!

I love my Brunton, I've had it for almost 10 years, it's hard to find parts for it now! It was discontinued a while back and the parts store is charging crazy prices. It's about time to upgrade.



quote:
Originally posted by manghu67:
I have a Brunton Optimus that I'm quite happy with. Bombproof multi-fuel goodness. Never had an issue with it.
The jetboil is a great system but to heavy for my liking so I went with the MSR Pocket Rocket. As far as weight goes it is great. very light weight and portable. Gets the job done for everything i need it for.

"Without team effort, the fight is lost. All of the links in the chain pull together and the chain becomes unbreakable." George Patton

quote:
Originally posted by Turbine 33:
jinx667

Whole setup minus fuel in here:




What bag is this and where did you get it?



It's an ultralight bag made out of cuben fiber. I have one just like it. Also have an ultralight rain cover for my pack made out of the same stuff. Forgot where I got them from though.
quote:
Originally posted by doctorrich:
BUMP.

For anyone looking for a Primus Eta Solo, Sierra Trading Post has a small stock of them available here.


This is the first one (and only to this point) that I got, and it is titties and beer in a self-contained package.

Chris
**********************
If I have to come back, I'm bringing a stun gun and a weed whacker.

I've just bought this cost me 20 pounds on ebay







I absolutely love it, really easy to use and it's likw having a campfire too. My one loos like its been made out of a paint tin and a soup can, really simple but really effective and it fits snugly inside a 12cm Zebra billy can.

Semper In Excremento Sum Solum Profunditas Mutat

I use the MSR dragonfly and love it. Has the ability to be a torch and melt snow like a bat out of hell, and then turn around and simmer something or cook eggs.

I bought two of the 1650Ml backcountry.com Ti cooksets off of SAC for around $20 each. I also have an aluminum 4L pot that was about $12 and is awesome.
Picked up an MSR micro-rocket last month but haven't had a chance to try it out yet. One of my coworkers bought my Jetboil and in a fit of boredom late one night I bought one of the Jetboil Sol Ti stoves. The pot is .8 L vs. the 1L pot of the original but it is noticeably lighter. I hate dealing with cleanup when cooking on the trail so I primarily just boil water for freezer bag cooking and both stoves are perfect for that purpose.
This is what I've recently switched to.

Bushbuddy Stove - they have two models, one is 5 ounces, the other is 5.5 ounces. Not just a wood stove - it's a wood gasification stove. They are designed to fit inside the Snow Peak Trek 900 titanium pot and pan set. (6.3 ounces - way less if you get rid of the pan and get a carbon fiber lid for the titanium pot like alot of ultralight hikers do)

It's pretty cool - you can use basically ANYTHING that will burn to cook with. Way more efficient than a regular wood stove.
jinx667 posted:
I used a SP GigaPower and it works great. To loose weight though I have switched to a titanium Evernew alcohol stove setup. Slower boil time, but less weight in the end on long trips.

This thing puts out some flame:







Whole setup minus fuel in here:



I carry the fuel in a 20oz soda bottle with a special o-ringed lid.

I know, one heck of a necropost. Just got one of these last week.I was considering doing a review of the Evernew stove. Of course, I am way behind the curve. Anyway, I am very impresssed. My 500 ml is boiling in 5 minutes. 30 ml of alcohol runs about 15 minutes. Very light, small and simple. I've so far used the Kleen Strip Green fuel. Burns great.

Garg 'nuair dhùisgear

This is a titanium version of the classic pop can alcohol stove?

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Yep, definitely a commercial version of the pop can stove. I do get more heat out of the Evernew than I did out of my homemade stoves. More durable also. Cost a whole lot more though. A well made, I think improved, version of a classic.

Garg 'nuair dhùisgear

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