A friend reached out to me today, asking if I had a line on obtainable M1 Carbine defense ammo.

Not having one, I had no idea.

Anyone able to chip in here?

Original Post

There are high end 110 grain choices. I've never spent the money to run enough thru mine to check reliability. I stick with 110 grain semi jacketed soft point from one of the major companies. I've seen a couple choices from Buffalo Bore, but have not tried them or heard anything. The 110 grain SJSP run fine. I have issues making sure the mags are reliable, especially the 30 round. Nice light and handy, girls LOVE them, too.

Dave

Most 30 round mags that are floating around for the M-1 Carbine are aftermarket reproductions and run from OKish to total junk and even the OKish one can vary in reliability from gun to gun. The GI WW2 15 round ones work best. I've run the Remington JSP ammo through mine and it worked without an issue.  It seems to be loaded by more than a few companies: Magtech, Remington, Speer, Winchester, Prvi Partizan, Federal, S&B. 

With expanding projectiles, the .30 caliber M1 Carbine creates a temporary cavity stretch that is slightly larger than that produced by heavy expanding .357 Magnum hunting loads and may be able to produce permanent splitting, tearing, and rupture injuries in tissues susceptible to stretch insults, such as the liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas, brain, and completely full fluid or gas filled hollow organs, such as the bladder. The best ammunition choices for the M1 Carbine are the Remington 110 gr JSP (R30CAR), Hornady 110 gr FTX, and loads using all copper Barnes X bullet 110 gr JHP (like the old Corbon DPX), and the outstanding Speer 110 gr Gold Dot (which sadly is no longer being made). The Remington load has an average velocity of 1864 f/s, expands to around .54” to .58” and penetrates 13” to 16” whether in bare gelatin, through automobile windshields, or Level IIIa body armor. This is comparable intermediate barrier performance to many good .223 loads. Likewise, typical loads using the Barnes 110 gr JHP penetrate 18.9" and expand to 0.56" in bare gelatin. The Winchester 110 gr JSP also works reasonably well, but has a bit smaller permanent wound channel compared to the Remington or Corbon DPX load. The Speer 110 gr Gold Dot carbine load was outstanding.  Conversely, the Federal 110 gr JSP carbine bullet typically acts just like ball without any expansion. Hornady 90 gr JHP-XTP bullets offered insufficient penetration when fired from the carbine. When practicing, just use inexpensive non-corrosive FMJ, either from CMP or some other reasonably priced source.

As the only semi auto rifle in my collection that I can legally own and shoot, I've a renewed interest in the M1 Carbine.  I've been trawling the web looking for mags for sale in Canada ... not much luck.  Out of stock everywhere I look.

@Community Member posted:

With expanding projectiles, the .30 caliber M1 Carbine creates a temporary cavity stretch that is slightly larger than that produced by heavy expanding .357 Magnum hunting loads and may be able to produce permanent splitting, tearing, and rupture injuries in tissues susceptible to stretch insults, such as the liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas, brain, and completely full fluid or gas filled hollow organs, such as the bladder. The best ammunition choices for the M1 Carbine are the Remington 110 gr JSP (R30CAR), Hornady 110 gr FTX, and loads using all copper Barnes X bullet 110 gr JHP (like the old Corbon DPX), and the outstanding Speer 110 gr Gold Dot (which sadly is no longer being made). The Remington load has an average velocity of 1864 f/s, expands to around .54” to .58” and penetrates 13” to 16” whether in bare gelatin, through automobile windshields, or Level IIIa body armor. This is comparable intermediate barrier performance to many good .223 loads. Likewise, typical loads using the Barnes 110 gr JHP penetrate 18.9" and expand to 0.56" in bare gelatin. The Winchester 110 gr JSP also works reasonably well, but has a bit smaller permanent wound channel compared to the Remington or Corbon DPX load. The Speer 110 gr Gold Dot carbine load was outstanding.  Conversely, the Federal 110 gr JSP carbine bullet typically acts just like ball without any expansion. Hornady 90 gr JHP-XTP bullets offered insufficient penetration when fired from the carbine. When practicing, just use inexpensive non-corrosive FMJ, either from CMP or some other reasonably priced source.

All US loaded .30 Carbine ammo is non-corrosive, even the WW2 and Korean War stuff. It was found that the carbines gas system with it's tiny piston would be impossible to keep clean with corrosive primed ammo, so it was loaded with the non-corrosive primers form the onset. I've never heard of any .30 Carbine being corrosive, but I guess it could have been loaded someplace.

Years ago, when Blue Sky-marked M1 carbines were $150, there was some ammo, headstamped 'LC 52', on the market, said to be corrosive.  The Chinese copied even the headstamp when making their own.

There was a whole bunch of that LC52 selling at gun shows back in the late 80's-90's.  I've still got 250 rounds of it from a case that I picked up 15 years or so ago.  It shot fine and I cleaned my carbines after each use so the corrosive primers wasn't an issue.

Last edited by Community Member
@Community Member posted:

There was a whole bunch of that LC52 selling at gun shows back in the late 80's-90's.  I've still got 250 rounds of it from a case that I picked up 15 years or so ago.  It shot fine and I cleaned my carbines after each use so the corrosive primers wasn't an issue.

I forgot about that stuff, saw it but never bought any. The Chinese also produced some 7.62mm NATO with a Radway Green (RG) headstamp  to mimic British made stuff, but when you pried open the almost impossible to open cans, it was copper washed like their AK ammo and corrosive as hell.

I have three carbines.  An IBM heirloom, a Winchester I restored with all Winchester parts, and a 12" Inland mixmaster that's all USGI except for the repro folding stock.  I've been fortunate to be able to pick up the FN manufactured 30 round magazines here and there (code AYP).  There are a couple of good articles out there on which of the 30 rounders work well and which don't.  My Lt. (who is a carbine fan) says that the one's he's purchased from Keep Shooting work well.

I have not found the two Mil Surp  M-1 carbines  to be reliable with hollowpoints or  softpoints.  I am not sure if it is the magazines or the guns, but the problems seem to exist with a variety of new, used, and Korean magazines.  Some hollowpoints might not get through a magazine or two without failing to feed, while some softpoints might be able to fire 50  rounds before you experience a failure to feed. 

I have two WWII surplus M1 Carbine and have found them to not work reliably with softpoints because the exposed lead of the softpoint manages to get caught on the top of the chamber as it is feeding. If you eject a softpoint round that has fed you will see a significant gouge on the top of the round.   If I could post pictures here I would post a picture of these rounds that I am referring to.  I spoke to the guy who runs Fulton Armory which specializes in M-1 carbine gunsmithing.  He mentioned that the softpoints will often rub on the top of the chamber and will result in a buildup of lead at the top of the chamber that will lead to stopages.

My personal choice given what I have experienced would be to stick to FMJ for reliability.--especially if you are not going to be able to buy a lot of rounds and do extensive testfiring with the ammo and magazines that you will be using.

 

 

@Community Member posted:

And M1 carbines sell now for the price of some high end AR15s.   No one sees a market there? A non-black rifle? edited an internet search finds some Univeral made M1s for around $500 

The Ruger PC pretty much fills this role. While not an M4, a guy with a PC, A 33rnd Glock mag and a couple 17s in a stock pouch is hardly unarmed.

@Community Member posted:

The Ruger PC pretty much fills this role. While not an M4, a guy with a PC, A 33rnd Glock mag and a couple 17s in a stock pouch is hardly unarmed.

But so much less cool than an M1.

If anyone needs me I'll be in the corner saying 20 Mission Drives the Gear Train Our Fathers.

Ruger PCC not as cool as the M1 carbine. But more practical. I have one and also a FightLite for restrictive places. Both use readily available quality magazines.

I have two options in my cabinets if I need to put my Standard Products M1 Carbine into service for some reason:

1: Hornady Critical Defense 110 FTX

2: Underwood loaded 85gr Xtreme Cavitator

Both are very accurate and I’ve had zero feeding issues with a whole assortment of 15 and 30 round magazines (all with Wolfe springs).

The 85gr is more precise and I love how it seems to perform in testing despite the stupid name, but it has a good deal of POI shift compared to 110 practice ammo and not just on the vertical axis. I think it works if you’re adding an optic to the carbine, but is too impractical for the limited adjustment of the stock sights. The Hornady 110 FTX is cheaper, a more consistent zero with practice ammo, and still has good performance.

 

@Community Member posted:

The Ruger PC pretty much fills this role. While not an M4, a guy with a PC, A 33rnd Glock mag and a couple 17s in a stock pouch is hardly unarmed.

This is exactly why I picked up a PC in 9mm when I lived in CA and the laws got extra double stupid regarding AR's. Not exactly a lot options for a modern, reliable, non-feature rifle if you want to legally use standard cap mags.

I already had my M1C, but it didnt have a pic rail on top, and it didnt take Glock mags. And, with it breaking down, it was a lot more handy and low-profile with moving about and traveling.

@Community Member posted:

The Ruger PC pretty much fills this role. While not an M4, a guy with a PC, A 33rnd Glock mag and a couple 17s in a stock pouch is hardly unarmed.

This^^^^is exactly what I’m rocking thanks to Judge Benitez 

Add Reply

Post
Copyright Lightfighter Tactical Forum 2002-2020
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×