Agree. That is a very neat machine for a different niche. I started my tactical nylon sewing on a (much less snazzy, pre-touchscreens etc) similar level of quilting and low-level embroidery machine. 

It was...fine, until it wasn't. Over-stressing it didn't break anything, but mis-timed it. Electronics are too complex; I can re-time and repair a mechanical, but had to leave this at the repair center and pay $120 to get it back in tune.  

And other stuff, like it simply will not handle what we consider to be heavy weight threads (92, 138...). Not bad for them, but will not work. IF you find a needle that fits, the other guides to get it down (or up) tto are not designed for this so it will work poorly, or simply not feed at all. 

Etc. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Thanks guys. Just as I suspected. I think it's great she has another machine for quilting, but she tried to make it sound like this would benefit me as well.  Actually, I guess it does, it keeps her busy and happy. Last week she had a guy out to service her Janome and Brother machines. Hate to think what servicing this will cost. I can't wait until the 300 lb palatalized table shows up. She's not sure if they bring it in / setup or not...

Garg 'nuair dhùisgear

OK, soI'm looking at the 

Sailrite® Ultrafeed® LSZ‑1 PLUS (110V) Walking Foot Sewing Machine

https://www.sailrite.com/Sailr...NElmDBAaAkIeEALw_wcB

Is this machine capable of heavy duty web gear stuff. I don't know squat about sewing. My wife is knowledgeable and willing to teach me, Is this machine capable of webgear and assorted kt?

Thanks for you patience. This is something I'd like to learn

Garg 'nuair dhùisgear

The LSZ-1 is a solid machine and will do gear.  It has the added benefit of being portable.

A little pricey, you can find lightly-used equivalents for maybe 200-600 bucks less if you have time and patience.

Try your local craigslist for "industrial sewing machine" or "commercial sewing machine."

Last edited by Sinister

Time flies!!! I posted stuff on here ages ago (early 2000’s...) using the Sailrite LS-1. I was able to make packs, chest rigs, pouches, etc., but you will have to learn how to properly assemble your projects to avoid bulky seams. The LS-1 has a very low presser height that won’t accommodate thicker assemblies- although what it can fit, it will most likely sew through (with the exception of scuba, and say a layer of flat (177337) webbing. Had some very frustrating nights with that machine. I stopped sewing for almost a decade, and only recently got back into it. Actually picked up a Juki 1541s, with servo motor, and a speed reducing wheel.  Someone asked how to slow down Consew 226r. You can slow it down AND maintain power using a good servo motor (versus clutch motor). Once you get better at sewing, you can just increase the speed on the motor. A speed reducer will slow it down to a crawl, and add extra power. It’s something that helps me with leather. Although I’m working on my hand stitching craft which is a whole different beast...

Hope that helps!

"Karma is only justice without the satisfaction"

Anyone have experience using a Singer Spartan (no frills Singer 99)? I bought one 10+ years ago from an acquaintance who was moving, needed money, and couldn’t take it with him. I never used it and rediscovered it while digging through my storage. Looks like it’ll handle up to  size 18 needles. I’ll probably be looking for a local place to get it serviced next week if it’s worth using for occasional projects. Definitely not production type work but stuff like sewing in sling swivels to get rid of sliders/excess webbing and maybe adding a row of PALS here and there to a pack or chest rig.

Joined: 12/2009
Location: California, Republic of

I had to drag mine out of the closet to check and I did some research. 

These robust machines were made for one year by The Singer Company in the 1950's in response to cheap plastic imports from Europe and Asia.  All the running gear is metal and they seem to be exceptionally well made.  About 50,000 were made.  It's a one trick pony in that it sews straight stitch only, but you can do a lot with a straight stitch.

It was designed to make clothes, not field gear.  Think cotton, not nylon.  Cotton clothing tends to have more 'give' than tactical weight nylon.  That being said if you go slow, you should be able to mend your gear and certainly your uniforms.

You can find a manual here:  https://www.manualslib <<DAWT>> com/manual/154300/Singer-Class-99.html

 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Awesome, thanks. I’ve been doing some research as well but most of what I’m finding is hand-crank conversions for light leather work and historical info. I’ll give it a shot and see how she does.

Joined: 12/2009
Location: California, Republic of

Don't get me wrong I love the older Singers, I cut my teeth on them in the paraloft, but, unless you are handy and like to work on this shit, they'll end up costing you more for parts and servicing.  A lot of the older models have no reverse stitch either, which is work-around-able, but can be a PITA sometimes.

Better, if possible, to stick with last gen stuff, that's relatively cheap but still plenty of life left in them.  

Also home sewing machines with plastic gears n shit are gonna wear out way faster, especially with the nylon shit we sew.  So I prefer used, metal industrials over new plastics.  

The best thing out there right now is a good used Juki 8700, or equivalent.   The Sailrites are good machines and very portable, if that's an issue, but also pricey.  If you have room for the external motor and flush-mounted table, that's what you want.      

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Sewingmachinesplus has Juki 8700's on sale for $799. 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Last edited by Trajan Aurelius

Da-yum that's a good price.  Those things are normally 1100-ish.  

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Locally a shop seems to be closing up and is selling a Juki DDL-8700-7 with a CP-160 control panel and table included, among other things (DDL-555, MO-2504, MO-2416, MO-623, US Blind Stitch machine, Consew 14TU, irons, ironing boards, etc.).  "All reasonable offers will be considered." The Mrs. wants a machine of some sort, and will need my mechanical aptitude to support her, so I would want a machine that could be used for repairs, gear mods, etc. Searching indicates that a Juki 8700 is a good place to start: what is a reasonable offer?

Juki 8700

Thanks!

Dr. J

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