Thanks Dorsai! I forgot who I got mine from but I see Dorsai has the ambi mag release. It makes mag changes a LOT easier for right handed people. The other thing I did since I live in CA, I used a simple thread protector for the muzzle. Brakes are not an evil feature, but I wanted to make sure there was nothing that could be mistaken for a flash hider.

@Community Member posted:

As the subject says, I’m seeking advice on which weapon system to use for my first carbine. I live in a rural area in Tennessee where we don’t have great expanses of open fields; it’s mostly hardwood forests and sub divisions. I do have a few pistols for conceal carry as well as a Mossberg 590 for home defense. 

I’d really prefer a one rifle fits all solution, which I suspect may be asking too much.  My primary concern is a rifle I can deploy along side my community team in the event that we need to work together to defend our families in a SHTF scenario. I’m not LEO/MIL, just a civilian looking to protect his family. I’d think a target outside 300 yards is entirely too far away to consider a threat, especially from a legal perspective. I believe the most recent statistics I’ve seen on here put the average contact distance in a OPFOR context at 150m, so I’d like to stick with that as a range baseline. 

Obviously, being cheap to feed is important so that I have funds available for training classes, which I view as more important than the firearm.  I’m open to adopting any platform, but after reading survival stories from civilians that lived through war zone blockades, I would prefer something that wouldn’t stand out/make me a target if need to carry a long gun on a supply run. Hopefully this doesn’t make me sound too much like a tinfoil hat type. Maybe I’ve just been in quarantine too long. 

Any advice is greatly appreciated.

 

I would buy  a Colt  6920 . GT distributors has them in stock and at a reasonable price, not the over inflated prices on gun broker  I ordered myself one this week and it will be at my ffl on Tuesday  YMMV

https://www.gtdist.com/colt-le...agpul-furniture.html

 

Last edited by Community Member

Without reading through all the replies, don't think about it too hard. If going with an ar, buy from a reputable company, buy only accessories you need and optic/sighting tool to match needs, and get to work training. Take a class or two. There are so many good choices you'd have to try to make a bad one. If you have the capabilities build an ar. It will teach out how to trouble shoot any malfunctioning parts in your system and give you a better understanding for the system as a whole

YMMV

 

I have to agree with Hoody,  but what accessories?  Minimally I think you need a flashlight for target identification-you don't want to shoot your spouse if they made some noises in the middle of the night.  A sling so you can do something with your hands without putting the firearm down. After that, it is what you want to spend money on. Oh, 1 more thing build a  first aid kit.

@Community Member posted:

I have to agree with Hoody,  but what accessories?  Minimally I think you need a flashlight for target identification-you don't want to shoot your spouse if they made some noises in the middle of the night.  A sling so you can do something with your hands without putting the firearm down. After that, it is what you want to spend money on. Oh, 1 more thing build a  first aid kit.

Lights are never a bad idea, neither are slings. That being said in a modern world it's very rare to be in a situation where you don't have any lighting-shtf is a different story.  I'm a bit of a minimalist but my duty gear tends to come with optics, slings, lights, in that order. If you're the type to mess with NVG's then you may do IR aiming device, sling, and not do anything else. For shtf I believe you need to fit the tool into the entire load out, not the load out around one piece of gear. 

ex

My current HD gun is an 11.5, with an adjustable rmr, buis, and a light. There are zero situation in HD were I'll use a sling. 

 

My duty 12.5 comes with lvpo, light, sling.  If I need to run something for cqb in low light have an IR I throw up top and call it a day. I grew up in a day of point-shoot so I am comfortable engaging in low light without an IR device if needed. I train for that though. Also, I can get behind the lvpo without the illumination on and use it if needed. As I originally said, don't overthink it, get only what you need to accomplish your mission, and train train train.

@Community Member posted:

Thanks again to all for keeping this thread alive and full of up-to-date info. I have been pricing options for the last few months and updating my “options pool” based upon the crowd sourced experiences and info I’ve found here.

Basically, I’m looking at BCM Recce 14 here:   https://www.rainierarms.com/bc...-mcmr-carbine-rifle/

And the hd patrol setup here: https://www.hdfirearms.com/pro...l-Package-145-NONNFA

and finally the SLR15 commander here:
https://www.slr15rifles.com/Pr...ductCode=Commander16


Just going to comment on the SLR15 Commander:  I like the way you think.  

We had three with FSP's (versus freefloat rails) as training rifles.  I took one,  put an Aimpoint PRO on it, an SOB 'B' Sling (mine, not the company's) and used it as my training rifle.  Sully has it gassed right, wonderful shooting rifle.

Personally, if I was buying one, I'd get the FSP model, with an A2 or Ai stock, unless you are wearing an external vest.

If you've ever been to one of Sully's armorer courses, he preaches inspection and has examples of different goofed up lowers, etc.  As a by-product of that, you can be assured the any lower you get from him will be in-spec, period, paragraph.

I generally put a good word in for Sully whenever I can because he know what he is talking about,  puts on a quality program, and is good to work with.

 

Last edited by Community Member
@Community Member posted:

Not to thread-jack, but how do you know how to rate spare part sets?

I see a lot of stuff like parts kits posted on PSA, CDNN, and other places.

How can I tell that I'm getting quality parts that are in spec to fit my rifle?

Buy from a vendor you know demands and sources quality.  An example of one who might not get a lot of notice around here is Roger Wang of Forward Controls Design.

https://www.forwardcontrolsdes...rings-Kit_p_113.html

https://www.forwardcontrolsdes...parts-kit_p_115.html

https://www.forwardcontrolsdes...iple-pack_p_176.html

 

 

Lots of reputable companies make parts kits. Aero, cmmg, forward controls. Thats one of those don't over think it parts.

 

If you are the type who likes to think a lot, be picky about the barrel. Thats 90% of a fighting gun right there.

Stream of consciousness to follow: if you build a gun make sure the headspace is checked. 1 in 10 random (but good through top quality) bolt and barrel combinations that aren’t from the same manufacturer, do not headspace correctly. The difference typically isn’t going to break your gun but it might effect function and accuracy. Some places will check your headspace for you if you buy them together. Some will even sell you a headspaced bolt (meaning the barrel was machined to match the bolt or more sensitive gauges were used to judge which bolt fit best) which is a good thing. Alternately, buy a factory combo. 

Remember also that the M4/AR FOW Is extremely reliable but has durability issues. There are materials science fixes for the low service life of most key components and there are replacement schedules for parts. If you’re going to shoot a lot you’d be well served to consider that in selecting parts and in maintaining or having your rifle maintained properly. A GI type 10.5 will require significant parts replacements as soon as 6,000 rounds on an aggressive firing schedule, and that number shrinks if your standards for function, accuracy or velocity are higher, or grows if your firing schedule is relaxed. 

When selecting a light, consider lumens and candela. Lumens is total output across the arc of the light. Candela is a measure of peak energy at the center and indicates the range of the light. I live in a rural area so I got a modlite OKW, which trades probably 30% of the wide spill of a Surefire M600DF for a 150% increase in range. I don’t notice the loss of spill at close range, I don’t mind it at mid range but the 150m max range beats the hell out of the surefire if I have to see what’s making a ruckus in a pasture. Don’t know which set of trades you’d prefer. 

Get a good sling. If you decide not to use it on your house gun you can take it off, but a lot of really smart people think a rifle without a sling is like a handgun without a holster. 

When selecting muzzle devices remember that there is a good chance you won’t be wearing earpro if you have to fire the weapon. I had a big budget for rifles when I bought mine and I have a 4.7” long suppressor. My 11.5 is about the length of an M4 carbine, but sounds like a 22 pistol. Good trade in my mind, among other things I don’t mind shooting animals in the yard without earpro with it. 

As magnified optics get better, lighter and smaller, I increasingly prefer them to red dots. I can still shoot a red dot as far as I’m likely to need to but I can’t guarantee that I’ll see the target. A 3x magnifier or a 1-10 LPVO let’s me see. Into windows or cars, past brush, into shadows. At this point I wouldn’t go back to a red dot without magnification for myself unless I needed to save money or weight. That said, an Aimpoint can be left on indefinitely and the battery changed every February 29th. That’s a significant thing for a home defense gun. Between the Aimpoint that can be left on and scopes with an etched reticle there’s a dead spot with stuff that will have an empty tube when you pick it up. I get that it works for SOCOM doing direct action. They plan that stuff, your event is unlikely to be planned.

Anyway just thinking out loud. 

For a one carbine fits all application (inside HD. and outside use), what about a LPVO with an offset MRD?

I completely agree with the utility of magnification in ID, but the pessimist in me worries that I'd be caught on high magnification with a sudden short range target. 

@Community Member posted:

For a one carbine fits all application (inside HD. and outside use), what about a LPVO with an offset MRD?

I completely agree with the utility of magnification in ID, but the pessimist in me worries that I'd be caught on high magnification with a sudden short range target. 

I do not think that's an issue-you can still snap engage if you use both eyes at cqb distances. If you are still concerned running a secondary aiming device is fine. If you prefer offset use that. I prefer up top. Ymmv.

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