Hey Everyone,

 

     I have a Lansky pocket sharpener and I've been using it on my EDC (Chad Los Banos Boker Hyper-combo edge) and the results have been ok. It just seems that I never get a razor sharp, or even close to a razor sharp edge on the damn thing. I give it a few passes on the sharpener and it's good for a few cuts, but starts getting dull again. I've looked around on youtube for some tutorials and it seems I've been sharpening it correctly, so is it the blade itself? I know it's not a Benchmade, or an Emerson, but from the reviews I read about it prior to purchasing it, it seemed like a pretty decent knife. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what might be happening? Thanks.

 

          D

"Would you believe we're the good guys?" : Remo Williams

Original Post
It sounds like you're leaving a burr on the edge. After you spend a little bit sharpening check the edge under bright, direct light and you should not see any reflection. If there is reflection that means there is a burr that you need to get rid of. Decreasing the number and pressure of passes is one way to get rid of a burr. 
Stropping is another, draw the knife over the stone spine first with VERY light pressure for a few passes, you can also use an old leather belt.

If you want to learn to sharpen a good way is to get a cheap knife, like a Victorinox paring knife, and practice with it until it can cut a paper towel.

Hmmmm, my grandfather always had a small sharpening stone in his apartment and when I was a teen he'd show me how he sharpened his Swiss Army knife. But being thirteen and stupid, I couldn't be bothered to pay attention. Like so many things he tried to pass along, I wish I'd paid attention back then, now, well, he died when I was in basic and I wish I could have those moments back. Thanks.

"Would you believe we're the good guys?" : Remo Williams

The biggest difference between a stone and your Lansky is that the Lansky is a lot more accurate in keeping the angle. That's something most people struggle with using a stone. It does sound like you have a burr or rolled edge. If you drag the tip of your fingernail down the edge and off the end, if a burr is present, it'll "catch" on it. A properly sharpened edge will be "equal" on both sides, centering the edge and not rolling off to one side. 

 

If you do decide to learn to use a stone, get some cheap, decent paring knives like the Victorinox or Dexter Russell parers to learn on. They're easy to sharpen and are soft enough that it doesn't take forever to get an edge on 'em. And it doesn't hurt so much when you scratch the crap out of 'em, which is almost inevitable with using stones at first.


Those of us who know must save those that don't from those that think they do.

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My anger will be aroused, and I will kill you with the sword; your wives will become widows and your children fatherless.-Exodus 22:24

Originally Posted by Dryden:
... Lansky pocket sharpener ...

Lansky & many others make precision sharpeners & getting a razor edge isn't hard. I've been using diamond stones with mine for more than 10 years & cannot wear them out. Look at the DPSPK from Smiths, throw away the oil & sharpen the knife under running water (much better at flushing away the metal fines).

https://www.smithsharpeners.co...asp?id=33&cid=21

 

 


Joined: 6SEPT2012 from Benton, Illinois Website: www.Precision.Works

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I use a kit from KME sharp, that I learned about here on LF. It lets you set an exact degree for angle and with the nylon bushing you can't get off angle. I use to sharpen all my knives, from pocket knives to kitchen knives and it works great. You can get either natural stone or use diamond stones.

 

http://kmesharp.com/

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Joined:  1/30/05           Location: Graham, Wa

Hmmmmm, lots of things to mentally digest here and I'm beginning to think it's the blade and not the sharpener, as one person here stated that all it takes is a few slow draws and the blade should be good to go. But it doesn't. I find myself having to put a considerable amount of pressure on the blade while drawing it and yes it's sharp, but my fingertip "catches' several places while checking it.

If it's the blade, that really pisses me off as the knife is only two years old and is used fairly infrequently.

"Would you believe we're the good guys?" : Remo Williams

I own a Spyderco Sharpmaker and it works great for me.  It seems pretty simple to learn and use.

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Joined: 1/12/04              Location: Southern Arizona

Sounds like it's just a burr or wire edge. You'll just need to strop it off. Get a piece of cardboard-I often just use whatever used shipping box is close by, flipping it over and using the corner-and strop the edge burr side down against the cardboard to remove it. You'll wanna match up the angle of the bevel with the edge of the cardboard so you're not buffing the shoulder or the body of the blade behind the edge grind, you're polishing the bevel that was ground when the edge was put on the knife. Its easy to show, somewhat harder to describe, so I hope that makes sense.


Those of us who know must save those that don't from those that think they do.

"If you count 'three', mister, you'll never hear the man count 'ten'".-John Wayne as Sean Thornton in The Quiet Man

My anger will be aroused, and I will kill you with the sword; your wives will become widows and your children fatherless.-Exodus 22:24

Originally Posted by DNW:

I own a Spyderco Sharpmaker and it works great for me.  It seems pretty simple to learn and use.

Probably the best $60 I've spent on edged tools. I can't sharpen for shit and all my blades are shaving sharp since I've gotten it.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The concept that the Bill of Rights and other constitutional protections against arbitrary government are inoperative when they become inconvenient or when expediency dictates otherwise is a very dangerous doctrine and if allowed to flourish would destroy the benefit of a written Constitution and undermine the basis of our government. - Justice Black, Reid v. Covert, 1957

I don’t that think that he owns a lansky sharpening kit, but one of these: http://lansky.com/index.php/pr...ix-pocket-sharpener/ . Those systems with tungsten crossbars are a great way to mess up your blade. Chuck that thing in the bin.

You want to start off with a stone that is course enough (for ex. 120 grit)to reform your edge this stone removes  metal fairly quickly. This stone reshapes your blade but leaves the edge jagged if were to look at it under a microscope so you want to smoothen it by working up to finer stones. I go up to 1000 grit. A really course stone is only necessary if there is damage and you need to reprofile.

 

You can use sharpening stones or a guided system.

No need for fancy Japanese stones a ceramic stone is far cheaper, less fussy and unless you are willing to pay top dollar maybe even better. Something like this is great:

http://www.knivesandtools.co.u...e-sharpening-set.htm or http://www.exduct.com/knife-ac...es/taidea-sharpeners I have ordered at this shop before: straight from China. These Waterstones make for great sharpening

You can  also use a guided system, some brands are: Gatco, Lansky, Edge pro, Wicked edge. These systems take a little longer and they can be a bit awkward with some blade shapes and with longer blades.

My tip, get one of these:

http://www2.knifecenter.com/it...fe-Sharpening-System and an extra http://www2.knifecenter.com/it...nishing-Hone-Ceramic  You really cannot go wrong with that piece of kit. You can always upgrade later, which really is not necessary as it does a great job.

It's been my experience that there are two kinds of knife sharpeners, those who see it as a chore or simply a necessary evil. And then there are those who enjoy it, they like the process, they enjoy the challenge or just like doing it by hand. 

 

If you're in the "it's a chore" category I would suggest this set up http://www.amazon.com/Work-Sha...ition/dp/B00EJ9CQKA#

 

If you like doing things by hand, or want to learn to sharpen with anything I would suggest a decent set of stones. Diamond if you use some of the "super steels" anything with CPM in from of it as an example. Water stones if youre using simpler steels like tool steels or 440 series stainles etc. 

I've had great luck with this place, and they have a variety of "starter" kits. http://www.sharpeningsupplies....q5kYBh8_EBoCDDXw_wcB

Second for the Lansky Sharpener with diamond hones. I can't sharpen a knife by eye worth beans. (Another reason to hate my vision being cross-dominant.)

 

When I popped the coin on a Randal #5 in the early '80s, I asked Gary Randall for suggestions. He recommended the Lansky kit for people that can't get an even grind by eye. So I use the Lansky on my good knives and use a Spyderco Sharpsmaker for convenience when sharpening my wife's kitchen knives. The Spyderco works well, too but you only get two grit sizes.

 

Joined: 1/14/08                   Location: Central Wyoming

The Sharpmaker only comes with 2 stones, medium and fine.

However, you can buy from Spyderco 2 different coarser "stones", a diamond impregnated vrsion and a boron impregnated version. These will remove metal quickly to help reshape blades. They also have an ultra fine version that gets thing even sharper.

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Any advice on sharpening axes? I have a large Estwing that needs it. I have a round stone for use on axes, and have read tutorials, but still seem to not have a clue.

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Joined: 6/14/03 1:02 PM

Originally Posted by MH64:

The Sharpmaker only comes with 2 stones, medium and fine.

However, you can buy from Spyderco 2 different coarser "stones", a diamond impregnated vrsion and a boron impregnated version. These will remove metal quickly to help reshape blades. They also have an ultra fine version that gets thing even sharper.

This is good advice. I bought a Sharpmaker at the advice of a very serious knife guy, but I never found the roughest included stones to be coarse enough for a base sharpening.

 

I recently bought the Ken Onion edition of the WorkSharp electric grinder. I haven't tried it yet, but it gets off-the-hook reviews.

Originally Posted by MrMurphy:

Any advice on sharpening axes? I have a large Estwing that needs it. I have a round stone for use on axes, and have read tutorials, but still seem to not have a clue.

 

This is by far the best alternative to having a Grandpa or old-school lumberjack teach you axe sharpening: A manual from the US Forest Service called "An Ax to Grind."  Available here in pdf. http://www.fs.fed.us/t-d/pubs/...f99232823Pdpi300.pdf

 

If you dig around they've also got some good chainsaw and tree felling publications.

 

The axe manual covers axe selection, hafting, maintenance, and sharpening.  You'll need a proper file and stone, and really watch your angles.  I establish and shape the edge, cheek, etc with a file and then transition to coarse & fine stones for sharpening.  When freshly sharpened it will pop hairs off of your arm and as long as you touch it up as you work it will last for a long time before you need to repeat the process.

 

The round Gransfors hockey puck stones are great to keep in the truck for field use.

 

Anyway, I highly recommend the manual to anyone with interest in axes and their use.

 

"Speed's fine, but accuracy is final" - Bill Jordan

MrMurphy,

 

When choosing a file, or files, remember, the longer the file for coarser it is.  

 

I use a 12" mill bastard single cut file when it's really dull, a 6" mill bastard for touch ups and an ignition file for touching up during use.  Smaller an light than a puck, which I also use.  See this document for notes on files...

 

www.apexhandtools.com/brands/nicholson_files/file_terminology.pdf .
 
Get a hand guard for the tang.  Getting the tang of a file jammed through your palm kinda sucks. 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

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