And loaded up.

Another view.

Back.

And with beaver tail/ helmet cave.  This sucker really expands and will take a full-sized helmet.  

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Thanks, well done and great pics. I've been through a few packs, Kifaru and Arc'teryx. This looks like the best yet. 

So will this be available as a complete pack? I hope so. Cheers 

Certified Glock, S&W, SIG  Armourer

Colt, REM Armourer

This looks so amazingly simplistic, yet thorough.  How did it take so long to make this, and have it stand out from the crowd?

Just wow.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Yeah and yeah.  The DG-3 comes complete with external frameset, internal frameset, bladder pouch, radio pouch, two extra internal pouches, and beavertail.  If you bought an equivalent MR ruck, you'd pay extra for all that shit.  

A lot of work went into this package.  The design guy, Ian,  has over 30 years experience in packs and outdoor gear, including work with Australian Forces, especially the Commando and SAS Regiments.

So you are getting a really good package, at a smoking price.   

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

OK, here's some more shit.  

117Golf Radio bag.  Tabs into back panel.

 

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

And here's how to convert it to an internal frame.  

Here's the stripped down bag, and internal framesheet.

Inside of frame sheet.  Note aluminum stays.  These guys don't miss a trick.

And internal frame compartment.

Frame slips in, alum stays away from you.

Pull out bottom flap.

And tuck over frame.  Mate velcro.

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Here I have pre-installed tri-glides for shoulder harness.  Note upper harness straps are inboard (and turned around), and top load stab straps are outboard.  If you were wondering why there are two sets of loops, there you go. 

Now you rig in the top harness straps.  For extra stability, pass them under the "jock strap".

Now rig the bottom harness straps, through the bottom loops.

Now cinch down harness as required.  Here I'm about as far down as I can get, so it rests on patrol belt pouches.  

Add in lower shoulder straps.  Here you just pass through bottom loops and butt up against strap loops.

 

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

And rig in upper stab straps.  For extra stability, pass stab strap under all shoulder harness loops.

Here's the internal frame pad.  

And in place.

Add on side pads and waist strap.  Note there are two sets of 1 1/2" loops; one on the bag, the other on the pad.  Pass through both.  This locks everything together.  

 

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

And boom, internal frame ruck.

Another shot.  Note nice curvature from alum stays.  

And that's about it.  Again, everything you see here is included in the package:

Main bag, external frameset, internal frameset, bladder pouch, radio pouch, two side internal pouches, and beaver tail/helmet hut.

You get all this shit with your order.  One DG-3 kit each, MC, CB, or RG in color.

ETA is early July.

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Shit all this computer crap had to get out and ruck!  Ran the external frame with 30 lbs, 10K speed march. Kinda hot but nice breeze.  Averaged 12:30 min/miles.  You will never see me in an ALICE or 1606 frame again.  Unless it's for testing purposes only, to remember the SUCK.      

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

That is all kind of nice.  I never imagined an internal frame providing practically all the benefits of an external, as far as providing breathing room for your back.  Just seems incredibly well thought out, and that's coming from a guy that has owned 2 different MRs with NICE frames.

Tankersteve

In Yorktown, VA.          Joined August 2008

Gov't Civilian, after retiring from active duty in 2015. 

 

'One's own open sore never smells.'  - Haitian proverb

Yeah I've had a few MR's of my own.  I am really impressed by these packs.  The internal framesheet is pretty fookin stiff, especially with the alum stays.  It doesn't stand quite that far off your back when you put it on; it's more like a std internal, in that it snugs up and helps you maintain balance, if that's a concern for you.  But also hot!  I'd say external for summer ops, and maybe internal for winter, especially mountain ops, or ski/snow shoeing.   

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Since a few folks have asked, allow me to post this again.  Here is a DG-3, compared to a DG-16, and a MR Overload.

 

DG-16, Overload, DG-3

Notice DG-3 is in between the two shapes, especially in top lid design.

Overload needs bolsters for BA; DG's not.

Front full zip on both.  Tri zip on Overload; std top lid on DG-3.

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

I would say, off the top of my head, that the DG-3 with internal frame would compare very favorably with an MR NICE frame and Futura yoke.  A DG-3 with external polymer frame is superior to a MR NICE, even new mil-spec NICE, IMHO.  

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Note for the discerning eye.  I have since detached the top lid, and put it on tri-glides like the DG-16.    I did this so when the pack is not full, you can cinch down top lid, fore and aft.  Just a quirk of mine I suppose.   

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

OK up Crowder's Mountain this morning, taking some pics for the new website in development.  

Here's the money shot:

And the front:

Good little hump up there this morning.  DG-3, with DG-3 frameset and full waist belt.  Adjusted for "long back", so waist belt fits on hips.   Notice how shoulder harness is sitting all the way up.  About 35 lbs, wet, maybe 8-9% grade, 10K total distance.  Wx: low 80's, humid.  But shade, most of way.  

 

I was pleasantly surprised at how the stock DG-3 system carried.  Since it's a bit shorter than it needs to be, for me, the frame gave me a little more off-set, since the curve was not aligned with my back.  This off-set creates a bit more space, and more ventilation!  Unintended consequences and a new hot weather technique.  Having a full waist belt back on also makes a huge difference, as opposed to speed marching with just the lumbar pads.   I think I'm gonna end up with two DG-3's; one rigged up as a short back, for use with belt order (in MC), and the other rigged up long back with full waist belt (in CB).  The first obviously for 2-3 day woodland patrol; the last for urban/semi-urban E&E, when I want to blend in a bit more.    

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Diz, WTF man, I always assumed you were out east somewhere around Bragg!  Crowders is my neck of the woods (or at least where I still think of as home).  If you can pull yourself out of the woods for a few hours one day, we could grab a beer on LKN somewhere. 

--Dave

 

"Do not touch anything unnecessarily. Beware of pretty girls in dance halls and parks who may be spies, as well as bicycles, revolvers, uniforms, arms, dead horses, and men lying on roads -- they are not there accidentally."

Ha yeah I'm pretty much like horseshit, around everywhere.  Love to link up sometime.  I have several packs to shoot in the coming days so yeah a cold brew would be in order.  

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Another funny thing.  I was doing speed work on the track this morning, and I noticed that I was putting out just as hard walking up a mountain with a ruck, as I was running 800's on a track.  Probably pretty close in HR and breath rate.   I always get a kick out of that; barely moving up a steep incline with a ruck, but hoovering like bitch.

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Okee Dokee, we went out for a little stroll today, out on the road to Morrow Mt.  MR Overload, head-to-head with DG-3.

My bud in his Overload.

And me in my trusty DG-3.

Switching at the half-way point.  My buddy in the DG-3.

And me in the Overload.

Both packs, about 35-40 lbs.  HAF (hot as fuck).  About a 10K. 

Conclusions.  They both are great packs, when you are fresh, the weather is not too stupid, the load isn't too heavy, you don't have too move fast, and/or you don't have to go too far.  Yeah and if I didn't have toes, I could wear smaller boots.  As the hump progresses, the differences start to tell.   Now the Futura frameset is a decent design, but , after awhile, the suspension padding is lighter and starts to wear on your shoulders.  The foam and mesh is in full contact with your back, just like an internal, and soon drenches your back.  And the hip belt is so stiff, it fights your natural hip movement, making them sore.  

As opposed to the DG-3, where the shoulder harness padding is noticeably better, the external frame creates a nice air gap around back, and the frame/waist belt flexes with you, rather than fighting your movement.  So overall, the DG frameset just carries the load much better.   

I think the Futura frameset is a great design for a 3-day internal frame pack, but just doesn't cut it on larger rucks.  Once you get over a certain weight limit, it rapidly breaks down.  I know they have improved the military NICE frame, but I think it's still just a gussied-up internal frame sheet.  We both concluded that a military ruck system, at a certain weight, just needs to have an external frame.

As an added bonus, we threw on his JPC and saw how it worked with both the DG-3 and the Overload.  No comparison.  The DG external frame literally "frames" around the rear plate, while the Overload center-points on it, with the bolsters fighting to keep it from sliding around.

And this is a guy with extensive experience, humping several different MR rucks.  Legit military load outs, on real missions and lots of training.  Just back from Eastern Europe as a matter of fact.   I think there will be several Crossfire rucksacks in his future.             

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

Re-rigging for internal frame took a bit. Would never, never have figured it out without your photos, still had a couple times I put stuff on backwards, etc. 

We need to talk about instructions, diagrams, etc. sometime. 

Will post up some photos, more thoughts, with loads and stuff... eventually. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Finally got mine rigged about how I want it, loaded, worn a tiny bit. 

First, my POV. I have long pined to get back to a mid-sized pack. I did ascent-pack sized things for weekend hiking trips back in the late 80s, and tried RAID and similar, thought about grabbbing a Pointman, but partly it never much came up as a planned thing. So, I ran big rucks for actual light/scout stuff, or had increasingly small assault packs for day to day work. 

Lately, I've been thinking more of how dragoons should work. Some from threads here on use of light vehicles. The DG3 is a tidge larger than my normal thinking there, but since it works well not overloaded with gear (it compresses well, no flop) it serves the purpose of a "24 Hour" pack. My thinking, and what it's being loaded for, is enough stuff to fight and survive in all reasonably expected conditions for 24 hours without contact with the vehicles. Not a week, not even three days, but overnight. So it has more than just snacks and water and ammo of an assault pack, but a micro-stove, a single smallish meal, shelter and warmth. Not a tent and sleep system, but a fly and woobbie. Etc.  

Anyway, on to the pack itself. 

Disclaimer before I start. Things I mention about are personal opinion, may not apply to you, and like all review stuff I do professionally any negatives are intended to provide help for others to improve theirs, or hopefully the manufacturer even takes it to heart and considers it. It's not griping. I like the pack generally, am going to use it, over competitors, and will suggest to others. Doesn't mean it's perfect. Nothing is perfect. 

I did the internal frame conversion. Partly as I have traditionally loved them, partly to just try it out. I have the DG16 for a frame pack (and my Kifaru Crewcab as a sort of in-between). As said above: complex, confusing in many cases even with the tutorial. Might never have figured it out myself. Could use not just good directions, but some color coded embroidery, arrows, labels, etc. Seen a lot do this, and it helps. 

I am right at 6 ft, and it fits me just barely for length. Surprised, but it does. Even has room under the shoulders, so not dragging like some previous packs I had (a 19" Zulu for example).  Works as hoped, it's very tight to the back so is not a problem even doing things like climbing ladders. At least the way I have it, nice spacing here and there so I do not expect to get sweaty back as you do on bad internals, but will see. 

As part of the conversion, I also did some hacky stuff as I do. First is the carbon poles. A trick for a long time, replace aluminum stays with carbon fiber. Nope, not carbon stays, just old tent poles cut to length. I heat shrunk the end to avoid wear (carbon filaments are abrasive as all get out). 

I love this. Never had aluminum that quite fit me, even with the spine guide at the stores, and carbon flexes. Not just to fit your shape today (which can change with outerwear, with LBE) but as you bounce around, or fall. Just more comfy. This conversion worked great on this pack. And is reversible. 

It IS nice the aluminum stays come bent to a reasonable shape. I tried it like this first, and +5 points for that. WAY too many packs come with straight stays. No one's spine is straight, but most people use them that way and then complain internal frames are uncomfortable. 

On to my next gripe: most packs are too sameysame. Even commercial, so this is not a camo-only issue. The buckles are all the same color, so I cannot find which, or tie the lid to the side by accident. So, I changed a handful out. Mostly, did the loops and SRs for the lid in black (and non-compatible fasteners).

So tactile as well as visual. 

 

The pack comes with THREE internal carriers. Radio, water and... dunno.

I would say it comes with a plethora of gifts. I ended up using, much to my surprise, two. But first I pulled them all. Sewed this very think white silnylon cover (sorta an extra pocket, but unused for now) to one: 

Similar to the clips, this is a human factors improvement. Gives me a fighting chance of seeing what is inside the pack. Not as good as if the back panel was sewn in a brighter color, but an easier fix than that. This the first one in, it gets the CB.

Which fits a 3L nicely. This is actually pulled UP so you can see it. Fits inside totally. This is a sample. The CB went on an unmodified carrier, first (closest to back), routed like this: 

 

 

Through the very snazzy dual zipper, multi-velcro storm cover. On top of that I put the white-covered carrier, which has my shelter. 

This photo is too close, but it's the storm flap at work for the hydro tube. Works brilliantly. Only change I'd make would be to put a zipper pull inside also. I loaded it inside, did lots of flipping to feel, but not a huge deal I guess. 

This is a good time to talk about the beavertail. Normally, my shelter goes out there in the front pocket for all my rucks. And the included one is nice especially if you are one who likes to carry a helmet,  but I didn't use it because it defeats the front zip. I may choose to go to a 100% top load ruck later on, but want to try a split zip pack. I might try finagling something so I have like two long pockets, one on each side of the zip. But, collapsible pockets. Do not want them there always, just when I want to stuff a jacket, or whatever else in there.  

Continuing the inside loading, what the hell is this for? 

Seems like a luggage strap, and when used that way, works fine. Hold down some stuff to keep it from moving about or spilling out.  Maybe it's for radio securing, but it works in that way for me, but is a pain with no clip. So I stitchripped a bit and put a 3/4" SR on it. 

Now, it's only 90% working like a charm, because there's different "3/4" specs I guess and I don't know from what, only had slightly narrower ITW SRs. So it's a bit tight. But, useful. Glad I did it. 

Side pockets are brilliant, but be forewarned they are ski slots. A lot of folks call any long-stuff storage between a side and the main pack a ski pocket, but no. Pockets with bottoms are just... pockets? No idea the name. But I use them for my Sven saw and poles for the shelter, walking sticks, long antennas, etc.

Ski pockets have no bottom. Skis are long, so you need them to stick out the bottom of the pack. The bindings keep them from falling through. The DG3 has BOTH pockets as one. Do not miss the bottom of the pocket, and let your stuff fall out as here my Sven Saw case is trying to. 

Also note the grommets in the photo above. Haha! They don't use grommets. Drain grommets are crap in five different ways. They use clever sewing to just leave a gap in the bottom. It's all the way down so drains perfectly, cannot tear out, cannot rust, etc. Lovely. More of this! 

 

Loading: 

If zipping, do not force it! The compression straps are very well placed, certainly the best I have used. You tighten them and it comes together, can zip with no force. Also, if you distrust zips, you can pretty much carry the pack with just the SRs tightened up. 

Not shown, sorry: The compression then works! As I said above, it actually works to go from overloaded to underloaded. Can be almost half the volume of a pack! Which is great. It's a BIT large for my intent, so I am going to have to make sure I do not overload it. What's in it here is probably a bit much and I need to cut back. 

I do wish there was a double zipper used here. With reliable compression especially, you could then unzip the bottom, get to stuff deep in the pack. Would be nice. 

The top is weird and I don't like it. It doesn't close. You rely on the lid and the good graces of the packing gods. I guess, make sure something large and solid is on top (as I did in the end here) so small things cannot leak out. Also sad and I may be trying to fix sometime: 

 

The cords to slightly tighten the top are elastic. Never understood that. On clothes, sometimes, but never on load items like this. It's just run at max extension always, so the elastic wears. Also, unless I am missing something, it's sewn in? That seems not like them, so deserves more exploration. 

If so, I will certainly sometime be doing a more intense sewing project to get easily-replaced cord. And maybe even tie to the SR somehow so I can bring the top down much tighter. Will also help for minimum-size pack purposes. 

 

The internal sewn pockets seem nice, are a great size that fits stuff I wanted, but when on the back and flopped open (unzipped) things fall out of them. So... sad, need to keep an eye open there mostly. Wish they had even velcro like the very nice removable pockets, which are the same as on the DG16 I assume, though I didn't try to trade them out. 

Lid is the last thing I could improve it I was in charge. I presume it would be hard to make one that makes everyone happy. It's too organized for me, too many small compartments I am barely using. I'd love one big bag, but as it's sewn on because it's a smaller pack, no options to change it. I may find I love it in a year, once I use it more, but not yet. 

What am I to put in these little pockets? How do I get it out? Etc.  

Same front as always, but this time instead of ignoring the velcro-closeable flap of scotchlight (day reflective), I put the cateyes there in the GITD duct tape, and then speed taped over the rest of the shiny bits. Now when moving (or super ninja stealth I guess) I can cover it, protect the tiny cateyes from being shifted or lost.  

If anyone cares, right side is GITD/IRR from patchpanel.ca, left is a red Unity Spark. 

Overviews:

Need a tiedown lower for the hydro tube. It flops a bit. Will probably just force the Grimloc to the sternum strap adjuster velcro as I did on the DG16, but hoping for even more inspiration. 

I also think that @FOXDIE made me join his Cobra buckle order, so will presumably be changing that out sometime. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

When I converted liters to American for a size reference the Pointman was the pack that came to mind,I don't have one. I do have a MolleExpress and MMR so the DG-3 would fill a spot. I think you meant Mystery Ranch Crewcab vs Kifaru. Like the idea of the ski pockets for axes etc. 

Joined  4/5/03  Location Maine

Good point for full size axes, sledges and shovels in the ski slots. We've done that in the past, I just forgot he has the pain. I also just got some pictures from my mom and it included a photo of me carrying a 100# Duluth pack decades ago which I had worked for years of therapy to block out.

Nope, I have a Kifaru frame with a Crewcab body, etc. Yeah. I'm that sort of guy. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

I am thinking this would be a pretty good "brushcraft" pack. A friend of mine, a retired Marine Gunner, mentioned once that one thing he liked about the large ALICE and frame was you could set it down and it didn't fall over like the "alpine" packs tend to do. More like a pack pasket which made it easier to work out of. From some pictures it looks like that may be the case with the frame. Those Duluth packs work great in a canoe.  Portages well you get your man card .

Joined  4/5/03  Location Maine

Duluth packs can suck my !@#$. Never worked well, anywhere. Did the next half dozen lake / river trips with my internal frame ruck, and some Sea Line bags. 

Portages, too: About halfway through the first big BWCA trip, we almost entirely stopped portages. See... I can read a map! I always could, so by the time I was like 14 I was very often in charge of navigating for whatever group I was with. And so I am looking at the next portage coming up, dreading it as well as planning and trying to figure out where exactly we go, how to get there reasonably (there are many that have extremely unreasonable approaches) and so on when I also see on the map a little blue reach going basically to the next lake, just 100 m NE of the portage. 

Didn't even ask, and no one else is looking at the map, so I go there. Paddle straight on through. We get about 2-3 of these Avoid The Portage down before anyone says "weren't we supposed to portage somewhere?" and I tell them what's up. Full agreement we continue that method, and much of the best stuff we saw on that (and following) trips. Lilly pads and dragonflies for 400 yards. Unvisited little reaches and ponds that result in the biggest fish you've ever seen inland, etc. 

Apparently, talking to more history-minded outdoorsmen, essentially all the routes are from the voyageur-era, so designed for 40 ft long wooden boats and hired hands do the lifting so what do the long-dead guys in charge of the maps care. Well, aluminum, and fiberglas go just fine down small creeks. The one or two routes that sort of petered out the entire rest of the trip were no more than about 30 yards of dragging/carrying the canoe, right side up, over some shallow rocky bits until it drafted again. I asked after one, everyone agreed even that splashy festival of tripping was better than the best previous portage, carry on. 

Portages are just poor planning. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

I took a year of french in High School. The teachers aid he would give me a 70 for the year if I promised never to take the language again. So this translation may not be completely correct but I think it is close. "Portage- carrying heavy and awkward shit over something something poorly defined /labeled as a trail."

Joined  4/5/03  Location Maine

Oh god! It's all coming back. Sometime in the first horrible dozen portages before I called bullshit, we also got LOST. Carrying canoes and everything. Yeah, turned around and all.

So that became another of my jobs while we still did the over-land routes: Get out early, run off and scout the way, often quite a bit of back and forth, then dropping rocks as cairns etc. to actually mark the shit-tastic route. Ugh. I am not going to sleep well tonight with all these horrible memories.

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

I'm maybe going to get rid of my glock curse, so replacing it with portage demons seems just right. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Good feedback.  I like your color-coded ideas on bags n hardware.

Interesting idea with tent pole wands.  Hmmm.

I also like the double main zip idea.  

And I think a detachable lid would be good to give you some options.  Also centers better when pack is not quite full.   

"Pacifism is a shifty doctrine where a person claims all the benefits of the body politic, without any of the responsibilities, and then claims a halo for their dishonesty." Heinlein

shoobe01 posted:

Oh god! It's all coming back. Sometime in the first horrible dozen portages before I called bullshit, we also got LOST. Carrying canoes and everything. Yeah, turned around and all.

So that became another of my jobs while we still did the over-land routes: Get out early, run off and scout the way, often quite a bit of back and forth, then dropping rocks as cairns etc. to actually mark the shit-tastic route. Ugh. I am not going to sleep well tonight with all these horrible memories.

If you lived somewhere dry you wouldn't have this problem: it's all portage

Diz posted:

Good feedback.  I like your color-coded ideas on bags n hardware.

 

Also, tactile coding. When it's dark, your eyes are busy, or you just can't see that. Best example of many I have done is the load lifters on a Kifaru Zulu I no longer have and cleverly took no photos of. They had to be tightened/loosened each time, so were used a lot, but there were straps all over, all of which were the same. And sorta behind my head so more or less impossible to see when donned. 

So, I sewed on 6" loops of binding tape. Feels totally different in texture, and shape, and if you worry about the slickness: a loop to grab. 

Similar happens with different sized hardware, and so on. For example, the 3/4" strap inside the bag as I showed above is great, as even now it's yet-another-SR there's no chance of confusing it with an outside strap, getting all screwed up there. 

 

Remember I am human factors for a living, so I have many thoughts, and usually can explain why. So feel free to ask me to rant more on anything. I like ranting. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Finally got away from the house long enough to put actual miles under the pack. Last night, in the dark, threw on an LBE, a hardshell, the DG3 and grabbed the dog.

Did 4.04 miles, at 3.3 mph average speed, and around here where it's pretty much all hilly as can be.  

This is pretty good speed for the route, and I can't generally maintain with other loads on. 

Pack as shown above is 34#, which I have topped with an assault pack in the past. It was pretty much a joy to wear that much load with a waist belt, etc. It felt like 10# in an assault pack. Nice. 

Fits overall rather like a DG16, which is especially weird as I changed it to the internal frame. I guess the shoulders and waist matter more than the frame. No real issues with pack wear/fit. Not even overly sweaty on the back panel, a common problem for flat backed internal frames, so I guess the shoulder bolsters and so on do provide some air space as planned. 

The waist belt still likes to loosen slowly, but you just check regularly and it's fine (a lot of packs do this). And the right side quick release at the bottom of the shoulder strap padding sorta poked me, so gonna see if anything obviously wrong there. 

Super nice having it be short enough there's no pack behind your head. I know that's obvious for the size, but I haven't had a pack this serious of this size for decades. Clearly good prone, but also simply wearing a hat, looking up, and so on, there's no restriction at all. 

 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

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So a mile into my ruck yesterday it came a flood. About a hour or so of heavy rain later I got done. Exterior was soaked but contents of the ruck were fairly dry considering I didn’t water proof them. Material is more water resistant then I thought it would be and the lid and beavertail do a good job of keeping water away from the opening and zipper.

More after I have used it like this, but packed the DG3 for my weekend. As slightly referenced in the Arctic pack thread, this is a cheat. We're basecamping for instruction, so there's a heater and my real sleep system elsewhere.

I am doing this as though it's my lightweight kit for all in the woods last week when it sucked less outside. It's all stuff I'll use, but overnight I'll just need more. 

This is food and not probably quite enough water for 2+ days. Separate snack pack. Jungle blanket and puffy coat warmth layer fit neatly across the bottom. Clothes to change into, and to sleep in, warmth stuff (gloves, hat, neck etc), winter-weight goretex, food heating/cooking gear, TP and wipes, assorted other stuff in the kit as shown flat in the back, Sven saw, probably more I forget. 

 Easy to pack. Still has room. 30.2# here, so could carry the ICS fly (it is set aside, may come), more water, and some ammo if I needed to. Internal pockets are hard to get to from the top, but work pretty well to keep smaller items like water bottles in check when zipped open. 

You may have ruined me for my previous distrust of front zips. Allowed me to organize better, so the Goretex is rolled up on one side at the top, food on the other. Both can be immediately pulled out when you flip the lid open unlike my usual top-loader method of every single thing stacked. 

Meals, to the right here in the tan bag. Goretex is French so the CE thing. 

Do wish the lid was a single big compartment, but then I might have put too much in it, wouldn't have this neat and compact shape. Will try to get photos and write up after I use it this weekend as well. Maybe I'll even get snowed on! 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

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