Smart as in all ways short of removing man in the loop:

  • Many sensors
  • Predictive 
  • Sight performs actual firing

 

IDF has used them, a bit, for a year or so, and NGSW is evaluating them, but now there's been some photos released of a US Army unit (pointedly not indicated which one but faces are not obscured so...) in Syria shooting them... and that's it. No real details, just the photos. Not going to be an accident, or a PR stunt by the mfg, but COULD be a PR stunt (okay, fine, call it PSYOPS) by the DOD to show up our enemies.

I have huge concerns with the packaging, cables, and what IS up with that gun, but still, they are coming.  

(P. S. I would love to help unfuck the human factors side so if anyone is working on stuff like it and agrees it needs help, hit me up!)

https://www.thedrive.com/the-w...ghts-on-their-rifles

However, with the SMASH 2000, when they put the crosshairs over a target, they can press the button the handguard to "lock on." The software-driven system will then compute an optimal point of aim, even if the target is moving, with the help of a camera and a laser rangefinder. It will also take into account the shooter's own movements, which they might make involuntarily because they are tired or stressed.

The shooter can then simply engage the target by manually aligning the crosshairs with the designated aim point that the SMASH 2000 projects into the sight picture. They can also switch into a "locked" mode, in which the system will only actually fire once it detects that the weapon is pointed at the right spot. Smart Shooter says this mode of operation also helps reduce the chance of inadvertently firing at bystanders, while also significantly improving the probability of a fire-round hit. Making the first shot is often extremely important in of itself, given that the target might retreat behind cover or otherwise alert other enemies in the area if the round misses its mark.

SMASH 2000 can also record its camera feed or take still images for analysis later. This is useful for training purposes, helping troops to figure out how they might improve their shooting, as well as giving the system a limited secondary surveillance capability. Smart Shooter says that the sights are network-enabled, but their exact wireless data transfer capabilities are unclear. 

 

On a Tavor

 

 

Supposedly good enough to help with counter drone (it is presumed the drone is a target tug, the thing under is the target) but I guess never mind on backstop?

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