So I sheared off something (doesn't matter what) the other day, while doing what I really think was perfectly normal installation. Dealer is very nice, replacing the broken bit for free but also said: 

...Eotech does not recommend using a screw driver to tighten the weaver bolt.  Try a quarter, it has worked for me.  

 

(no, it's Picatinny not Weaver but whatevs)

Which... seems odd to me. I mean, I am used to things like some iron sight adjustments, and a fair percentage of hunting-class scopes having the windage/elevation adjustments with a curved slot, to work better with a coin.

But I always assumed this was just allowing for the hacky solution of rednecks who don't have tools, but may have loose change in the floorboards of their pickup truck. It also seemed really, really pointless for military stuff, I mean "you think I go into combat with loose change in my pocket?" 

But this seems to say that some mfgs have actually set up their equipment specifically to work with coins, for not just fitting slots but for the torque you can get off two fingers on a coin. With things like every gunsmith having a coin soldered to a driver handle, this is weird to me. 

But, I always want to know the truth. I am open to learning. Anyone know for sure about this? 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Original Post

I always assumed the curve was to facilitate using the rim on either spent brass or a live round. Figure you always have an example of that around a firearm....

I also think it has to do with torque. You can get a lot more ooomph (that’s a technical term by the way) with a screwdriver than you can with a coin or casing. Using a driver may cause you to over torque the the screw/bolt causing damage like you have seen firsthand. Aside from being stupid - having a coin soldered to a drive handle would defeat the purpose of limiting torque.

I have one of those Wheeler torque drivers in in/lbs that I use for that stuff in the shop. On the range I use a spent case.

__________________________________
"Experienced cops don't have 'hunches'. They have superior observational and analytical skills which allow them to make the connection between otherwise innocuous facts, and take appropriate action to assess that perception."

~ Doug Mitchell

 

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Joined: 03/08/2008     Location: Sandy Hook, NJ

Oh sure, forgot some curves (gas ports on FAL etc) are for cartridge rims. You can usually tell those as not a simple slot but has relief for the rest of the case. And being brass, those are for sure torque limited! 

I also do get how a coin would provide less torque, just never understood that anyone actually designed for "coin limited torque." Be interesting to know for sure if any mfgs or other knowledgable folks. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

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