Having just survived a week without water and power due to Harvey... we got hit at a low point supplywise.  We had 4 5 gallon jugs, all empty and 1 case of water. I was on duty the entire time so didn't use up any supplies,  wife got by on less than 10 bottles despite it being 90F.

 

 

A couple 55 gallons and a gravity filter would be excellent.  We are on well water, but if power fails... no water.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So low speed, i'm in Park.

"I could stand to hear a little more.." Jayne

Training is brief. Death is forever. PAY ATTENTION.

Joined: 6/14/03 1:02 PM

XTCBX posted:

I have a pool (chlorine)...what do I need to do to make that water drinkable?

Use search term "make pool water safe to drink".   There were 49,700,000 results.

If you can test your water and the chlorine level is <=4 parts per million (ppm) the water is considered safe to drink.  1-2 ppm is what most municipal systems use and pools generally run at 5 ppm.  I am sure you have swallowed pool water before and suffered no real effect from it besides "Ewww !"  The city water in Kabul, where you could find it, was 5 ppm.  I still did not drink it.  It made my eyes water just smelling it.

Chlorine evaporates over time.   That's why you have to keep adding it.  Simple solution - let the pool water sit, uncovered, until you can't smell the chlorine then run it through your filter of choice to be sure.  Aeration helps this go faster.

Finally, flat water sucks so aerate it by pouring it back and forth 5-6 times.  That should make it taste better.  So does so flavoring so keep that in mind, tea, sports drink additives, etc. 

In one of my more lucid / OCD moments, I re-purposed an old foot locker with "Water Treatment Supplies".  It includes some water keys, household and fire hydrant style, a couple of wrenches and a set of screwdrivers and FM 21-10, FIELD HYGIENE AND SANITATION.  I purge my water heater twice a year so I have a hose, a reducer coupling and some clear tubing to fill water jugs and a number of 5 and 2.5 gallon containers.  5 gallons of water is lot to lug around the house.  Newer homes in California have a sewer blowout assembly to prevent ugliness from sewer blockages.  You can pull this cover, it looks like an 8" manhole cover, and drain your water directly into the sewer instead of 50 gallons of boiling water running down the driveway and into the grass.  Hot water is a great way to kill weeds without chemicals.  Guess I need to PMCS  that cache and add some supplies to it.  

I have a 175 gallon Rubbermaid stock tank in the backyard with some fish.  No treatment at all.  If the goldfish are pretty sensitive to pollutants.  If they are flourishing then the water is generally safe.  I'll still filter it if I have to go that far.  

Now I have to get some more stuff.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

So my parents have a well and generator as well, but I came across this in my research. Seems pretty easy to install with the existing submersible pump.  This would work regardless of power, still might want filtration.

 

anyone else have thoughts on this?

 

https://www.bisonpumps.com/

Installation video.

https://youtu.be/hC4ILppUCZY

 

"The facts, while interesting are irrelevant: It's not what you know that matters, it's what you don't know that tends to get people killed."

 

"Nobelesse Oblige"

I think I've seen many similar pumps dropped in Afghan villages, and they worked well.

It is better that they do it imperfectly than that you do it perfectly. For it is their war and their country and your time here is limited.

 

                                                                                                                        —T. E. Lawrence

 

 

POSREP: UAE

Trajan Aurelius posted:
XTCBX posted:

I have a pool (chlorine)...what do I need to do to make that water drinkable?


In one of my more lucid / OCD moments, I re-purposed an old foot locker with "Water Treatment Supplies".  It includes some water keys, household and fire hydrant style, a couple of wrenches and a set of screwdrivers and FM 21-10, FIELD HYGIENE AND SANITATION.  I purge my water heater twice a year so I have a hose, a reducer coupling and some clear tubing to fill water jugs and a number of 5 and 2.5 gallon containers.  5 gallons of water is lot to lug around the house.  Newer homes in California have a sewer blowout assembly to prevent ugliness from sewer blockages.  You can pull this cover, it looks like an 8" manhole cover, and drain your water directly into the sewer instead of 50 gallons of boiling water running down the driveway and into the grass.  Hot water is a great way to kill weeds without chemicals.  Guess I need to PMCS  that cache and add some supplies to it.  

I have a 175 gallon Rubbermaid stock tank in the backyard with some fish.  No treatment at all.  If the goldfish are pretty sensitive to pollutants.  If they are flourishing then the water is generally safe.  I'll still filter it if I have to go that far.  

Now I have to get some more stuff.

Bag of diatomaceous earth?  Bag of activate charcoal? UV light?

I am curious at how deep a well you can put one of those bison pumps on.   Here out west, our wells tend to be several hundred feet deep.   Wells are awesome, however as mentioned, with most wells, once the power goes out, the water supply stops.   A simple solution is to install a large storage tank next to your well.   Think 5 - 10 thousand gallons.   The well feeds the tank (with a float switch) which then feeds a pressure pump to your house.  Even if the power goes out, you should have gravity flow water provided that your tank is not lower than your house.   If you have a faucet at the base of the tank, you can fill containers there also.  If you really want to get fancy (and expensive) replace your regular well pump with a solar pump (and tank).  Old school is a windmill and tank. The simplest solution  (and cheapest) though is to simply have your well set up so you can just disconnect the pump from your electrical supply and plug it into the generator.   Fill water barrels and disconnect.   Repeat as necessary.  That being said, ensure that your pump is completly disconnected from the regular power source before connecting to a generator.   You dont want to back feed a power line and have some power company worker get electricuted.

bradne posted:

I am curious at how deep a well you can put one of those bison pumps on.   Here out west, our wells tend to be several hundred feet deep.   Wells are awesome, however as mentioned, with most wells, once the power goes out, the water supply stops.   A simple solution is to install a large storage tank next to your well.   Think 5 - 10 thousand gallons.   The well feeds the tank (with a float switch) which then feeds a pressure pump to your house.  Even if the power goes out, you should have gravity flow water provided that your tank is not lower than your house.   If you have a faucet at the base of the tank, you can fill containers there also.  If you really want to get fancy (and expensive) replace your regular well pump with a solar pump (and tank).  Old school is a windmill and tank. The simplest solution  (and cheapest) though is to simply have your well set up so you can just disconnect the pump from your electrical supply and plug it into the generator.   Fill water barrels and disconnect.   Repeat as necessary.  That being said, ensure that your pump is completly disconnected from the regular power source before connecting to a generator.   You dont want to back feed a power line and have some power company worker get electricuted.

Windmill feeding into the tank.

Old school yes- but works independent of power or supervision.  Depending on well depth...it does not have to be a big one.

They do require maintenance now & then.  Plus fan removal become part of your per-hurricane check list.

Cannot find a reference to it, but I think you just disconnect (they may have automatic clutches) for high winds, and in known high speed conditions you can take off the blades I think. Overview of the old timey windmill today:  

https://www.homepower.com/arti...s/pumping-water-wind

There are also lots and lots of small electrical generation turbines, which are getting better at free wheeling under exceptional conditions. A few are working on systems that will actually operate through the worst possible storms so those may be around soon. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Windmills can be pretty tough and can tolerate some high winds as long as they are furled (tail pulled in).    There are a lot of windmills that over 100 years old and still going strong.   As LINZ said, they can be high maintenance.   You can still buy a brand new windmill, but most ranches and remote areas just use solar pumps anymore.   Let initial cost, less maintenance.    

Linz posted:
Trajan Aurelius posted:
XTCBX posted:

I have a pool (chlorine)...what do I need to do to make that water drinkable?


In one of my more lucid / OCD moments, I re-purposed an old foot locker with "Water Treatment Supplies".  

...

Now I have to get some more stuff.

Bag of diatomaceous earth?  Bag of activate charcoal? UV light?

Please elaborate.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

I remember as a kid working on the pool with my dad. Once a year there was s certain amount of diatomaceous earth that got thrown in to the mix but I don't recall its purpose. 

Mojo/Mark
__________________________
Yo homey, is that my briefcase...?
Vincent from "Collateral"
__________________________
You want the good life, you break your back, you snap your fingers, you snap your neck... Prong/Demon Hunter
__________________________

Because...I Can. 


Joined: 9/30/09
Location: Northern Nevada (Reno/Sparks)

MOJONIXON posted:

I remember as a kid working on the pool with my dad. Once a year there was s certain amount of diatomaceous earth that got thrown in to the mix but I don't recall its purpose. 

Ah, Google helped me. The DE is helpful in the filtration process, because diatoms are tiny and hollow they help prevent the filter elements of swimming pools from becoming clogged. 

Mojo/Mark
__________________________
Yo homey, is that my briefcase...?
Vincent from "Collateral"
__________________________
You want the good life, you break your back, you snap your fingers, you snap your neck... Prong/Demon Hunter
__________________________

Because...I Can. 


Joined: 9/30/09
Location: Northern Nevada (Reno/Sparks)

Trajan Aurelius posted:
Linz posted:
Trajan Aurelius posted:
XTCBX posted:

I have a pool (chlorine)...what do I need to do to make that water drinkable?


In one of my more lucid / OCD moments, I re-purposed an old foot locker with "Water Treatment Supplies".  

...

Now I have to get some more stuff.

Bag of diatomaceous earth?  Bag of activate charcoal? UV light?

Please elaborate.

Apologies- I was trying to second guess you.

OK- filtration of water for drinking purposes

The DE will do a very good job at removing particulates

The AC will do well in removing many pollutants: not so hot for removing arsenic, glycols, cyanide etc but pretty good for dead animals in the water supply.

Most commercial or industrial systems use them.  Commonwealth military used to issue the troops a 'Millbank filter' bag for this purpose: it worked but best filled with charcoal scrapped off trees or logs.  Had a look- there are commercial equivalents made of fabric or disposables.

UV was a stab in the dark for sterilizing any parasites or critters that got thru the DE or AC- although chlorine treatment will work better & quicker.

Incidentally, did anyone here mention boiling suspect water supplies?  If you have power available, I'd say a pressure cooker would be better than a kettle.

Not familiar with water uses, but will have to look at that now. Diatomaceous earth is something we use all over for food storage, and I just recently learned for yard bug control. Diatoms are the fossilized remains of something called diatoms. They have little hard shells a few microns across, and when mined you get this slightly abrasive powder. 

The upside for food storage is: it's the right diameter, and the shape of the little balls includes little holes and slots, so that bugs that crawl through it get their breathing organs cut up and die. But to large land mammals like humans, cats and dogs: nothing. No effect. So, it's used by the shovelful in grain elevators, etc. etc. Same in the yard: dump a bit in the spreader and send it into the yard annually and the bugs get cut up as they crawl around. Natural, automatic bug control. 

Can be expensive in small quantities. We buy 50# bags from food wholesalers or grain supply stores for the same price as you can get a half pound at the health section, and replace them every decade or two. If someone wants to bring over a small jar and borrow some, please do. 

The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich quick theory of life. – Theodore Roosevelt

 

Joined: 19NOV2004   Location: Mission, Kansas

Many small wind generators (for sailboats, etc) can freewheel in higher winds, but better ones actually self-brake.  The super high velocity speeds can cause them to fly apart, creating serious safety implications.  For a named storm, I'd want to remove the blades, if not the motor as well.

I think we need a thread on alternate power methods.

Tankersteve

In Yorktown, VA.          Joined August 2008

Gov't Civilian, after retiring from active duty in 2015. 

 

'One's own open sore never smells.'  - Haitian proverb

tankersteve posted:

Many small wind generators (for sailboats, etc) can freewheel in higher winds, but better ones actually self-brake.  The super high velocity speeds can cause them to fly apart, creating serious safety implications.  For a named storm, I'd want to remove the blades, if not the motor as well.

I think we need a thread on alternate power methods.

Tankersteve

Good idea.  I assume they come pre-wired to plug into a boat electrical system.

You could have a few set up around the property: had to lose them all without losing everything.

I live in earthquake land, I just bought some water cans from buylci.com for $24.79 ea., with free shipping. They're 5 gallon plastic jerry cans.  I have Costco water set aside as well. It's just me and my dog. I have a saltwater pool, anyone know how to make it drinkable if I need to. 

I just picked up two 55 gal food safe barrels that were used for lime juice and five 5 gal jugs that held margarita mix from a local guy for $45. He gets them from a beverage company. They look great and should be easy to pressure wash clean. I figure that will hold me and my daughter over for about a month and if I need to go longer, I'll start collecting rainwater and other sources and use my filter.

"Never underestimate the predictibility of stupidity" RIP SSG Brad King. KIA April 2, 2007.

What about a BioSand filter/Iron-amended BioSand ?

There are a lot of free designs available for semi-portable and non-portable BioSand systems.  A non-portable system than includes a clean water storage tank seems ideal for stay at home/bug-in place planning.  Most of the plans available call for $50-to-$130 materials to construct, seems like a reasonable price to me.

There used to be a thread on LF about them a few years ago, but can't seem to find it for the life of me.  Surely someone on here has built one or two by now.

Found this.

http://www.biosandfilter.org/

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

If you have a water well and want to prepare for a long term power outage a hand pump comes in handy.

This video shows in great detail how to construct such a hand pump from basic materials with basic tools.

https://vimeo.com/channels/emas/8365884

 

Water filter.

https://vimeo.com/channels/emas/20835450

 

If you don't have a water well and you want to drill your own, see other videos that EMAS has made.

https://vimeo.com/channels/emas/videos

J: March 2004

L: Texas

DIY "Berkey-Style" Gravity Water Purifier


Materials Needed:
Food grade Buckets w/ lids and gasket
 Berkey filter twin pack (black, or the white ceramic)
Gravity feed spigot/faucet kit
3/4" drill bit
7/16" drill bit

Any stackable bucket with lids can be used, the best are the BPA-Free "food grade" buckets that come with a gasket in the lid.  You can get them online, in stores, or sometimes buy used ones from a local restaurant for practically nothing.            

Drill two 7/16" holes through the bottom of the top bucket and the lid of the bottom bucket. Insert the two Berkey filters into the top bucket with the rubber grommet between the bucket and the filter. Tighten the nuts on the filter shafts with the lid between the nuts and the bottom of the top bucket.

Drill a 3/4" hole near the bottom of the bottom bucket, high enough so the spigot clears the bottom of the bucket. Two inches is usually sufficient. Install the spigot kit, with washers on both sides and nut on the inside. You don't want the spigot to be below the bottom of the bucket, but you want it as low as possible.

Stack the buckets (seal the bottom bucket lid), fill the top bucket with water, cover (but don't seal) and enjoy!  Filters can be lightly "scraped" with a brillo pad when water flow decreases, and each filter element is good for approximately 3000 gallons. Multiple elements (1-6, depending on size of bucket) can be installed for increased flow.  Additionally, you can use quality cheese cloth to strain the dirty water preventing sediment from decreasing filter flow rate and/or lifespan.

Item list examples:

BPA-Free Bucket with Lid & Gasket
Faucet Kit
Cheese Cloth for pre-filtering sediment

Black Filter
White Ceramic Filter

 

A practical option for those unwilling to shell out $$$ for a Berkey, it's less form but equal function.

I got a half dozen of these. 15 gallon poly drums. They are manageable to move by hand (hand truck works best). I take one or two with me when I go camping. Then if the camper runs low on water, I can used the drums to refill or run for water if someone goes to town. 

But they are in the garage, filled, sealed, bleached (well water) and dated. 

The gene pool needs some chlorine.

 

Joined: 4/7/03   Location: Renton, WA - Barrow , AK

Not yet available but this might be promising:

CSIRO oil delivers spoils: Earth’s toughest stuff and pure water


CSIRO scientists have unveiled what could be the agency’s next big money-spinner: a filtration membrane made from cooking oil, which can purify water in a single step.

Researchers say the new technology, unveiled overnight in the journal Nature Communications, could “supercharge” water filtration for an estimated 2.1 billion people without access to clean drinking water.

Dubbed “GraphAir”, it is adapted from the Nobel prize-winning wonder substance graphene — a form of carbon that is just one atom thick, and is considered the strongest material on Earth. A test run, using water from Sydney Harbour, produced “very pure” drinking-quality H2O.

The team is now looking for industry partners to scale up production and trial the technology overseas. “It’s a massive opportunity,” said lead author Dong Han Seo.

Graphene is tougher than diamond, extremely conductive and twice as bulletproof as Kevlar, despite being stretchable and almost completely transparent. But the material, usually produced by peeling extremely thin flakes from graphite, tends to be impenetrable by water. Last year, the CSIRO announced it had developed a cheap way of manufacturing graphene from soybean oil. Now the team has infused it with “nano-­channels” big enough to let water molecules through, but small enough to block the likes of salt, detergent or oil compounds.

The researchers found that a 4sq cm strip of GraphAir could purify half a litre of Sydney Harbour water a day. They plan to produce A4-sized sheets, boosting the yield 100-fold. Unlike current filtration membranes, Dr Seo said, the mat­erial did not become blocked by pollution or other contaminants.

This meant it could be used for longer before being replaced and contaminants did not have to be extracted before purification.

The team is trialling the technology on water from mines, factories and contaminated sites.

Applications could range from industrial-scale desalination and wastewater treatment to household water purifiers for Third World families. The humanitarian possibilities could be matched by the commercial potential, marking it as the CSIRO’s next big earner in the wake of wi-fi, plastic banknotes and ­extended-wear contact lenses.

The research also involved scientists from Sydney and Victoria universities, Queensland University of Technology, University of Technology Sydney, the National Measurement Institute in Sydney and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

https://www.zeromasswater.com/

In short, a solar powered dehumidifier that contains a small reservoir and pump. Self contained water generation.  

We are planning on this system next summer. With plenty of humidity and sunlight it should work  fairly well.   Two units will supply the property with enough cooking and drinking water as long as the system holds up.

Permitting with the county will be interesting. These will probably be the first units they have seen. 

__________________________
No one ever got into Valhalla unarmed.

Hetzer, that is pretty cool. 

I'd like to mention that for a 'normal' dehumidifier, most of the reading I have done recommends strongly against using water for drinking/cooking.  In fact, many recommend to treat it like grey water.  Most dehumidifier coils are made from heavy metals and the water drips directly off them.  Airborne pollutants are collected on the coils from the fan drawing air, and make their way directly into the water.  And the reservoirs are not food-rated.

It is fine to re-use it for things you'd potentially use grey water for - flushing toilet, watering plants, etc.  But I suggest serious research on whether you can safely consume it.

Tankersteve

In Yorktown, VA.          Joined August 2008

Gov't Civilian, after retiring from active duty in 2015. 

 

'One's own open sore never smells.'  - Haitian proverb

And make sure your talk droid understands the binary language of moisture vaporators.

------------------------------------
Assaulting enemy camps from 400 yards away since 1972.

"There is no nice way to arrest a potentially dangerous, combative suspect. The police are our bodyguards; our hired fists, batons and guns. We pay them to do the dirty work of protecting us. The work we're too afraid, too unskilled, or too civilized to do ourselves. We expect them to keep the bad guys out of our businesses, out of our cars, out of our houses, and out of our faces. We just don't want to see how its done."
-Charles H. Webb, Ph.D.

Joined Lightfighter 1.0: early 2001, Lightfighter 2.0 11/19/02

Location:  Fucking Connecticut.  Goddammit.

Seems to be a lot of videos about it.

Very interesting.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Steve,

 

It is purpose built to provide off the grid drinking water. But I do share your concern.  Especially if the water wasnt piped to the house and sat.  

__________________________
No one ever got into Valhalla unarmed.

Add Reply

Likes (4)
Post
Copyright Lightfighter Tactical Forum 2002-2019
×
×
×
×
×