Winter is over, so prepare for Summer and maybe the coming "Troubles" in the middle east...

Preparations car:

Snow tires taken off  car     ->OK

 Have car underside  pressure washed & checked for rust than sprayed with wax preservative   ->OK 

Have motor washed and prayed with preseservative ->OK 

 Remove winter gear  (max. tea light candeles, fatwood and other firestarter, ice-scraper, snow-brooms and a snow-shovel, small bags of birdcage sand and salt, Packing duffel (for overland travel in Winter)    with:Spare warm chlothing, one big old aluminium pot aprox 1 gallon? for melting snow. (Also handy for moving snow if here are more persons than shovels.)  Sleepingbag, foam mattress and tent, Swedish bowsaw 30# + axe, from car.       ->OK 

Inspect, wash & store all this  for further use        ->OK

Check Tools for rust, declutter trunk and all small compartments  -> OK

Renew water and food supply        -> in process

+++++++++++++

General Prepeardness:

Stocking up on water containers to be filled

2 more water-filterof same model and spare filter-elements

Canned food of all variations - if on sale - and cheap booze primary  for bartering

10 more Glock magazines & 2.000 more shot of  .40 S&W I also need to train more

at least 1.000 more shot of .308 and 8x57 IS

12ga. Slugs and also shot 

and buying a .22 lr !!!

Lithium batteries AA, AAA, CR123 and 9V block, more eneloopes AA &  AAA

Crank radio, solar charger

Helmet, ballistic plates & carrier

Make at least the measurements & and a list for wood beams and planks to make a makeshift air raid shelter from my cellar, I really don't plan to stay in Hamburg during a mayor shooting war, but who nows what comes...

 

 
Original Post

As a suggestion:

Alladin kerosene lamp, extra mantles, extra chimney and kerosene. 

Or

Coleman lantern, extra mantles, extra glass and fuel. 

Light makes a place more “civilized”.  The Alladin is quieter than the Coleman, doesn’t require pumping and the fuel is less dangerous.  But the Coleman can share fuel with a stove and run off of gasoline.  

@ RICK R2 

Thank You for your advice, I have already a few of these

Feuerhand Hurricane Lantern

They are not as bright as an Alladin Lamp, but have carrying and hanging handle, and are also silent, I used pressured lantern (Coleman and Petromax) in Africa, I find their hissing real annoying, if I have to think and write or try to sleep they are lots more bright so. I also want to stay away from open flames (also candles I have lots of) as much as possible. A light makes "a home" you are right, but in an otherwise "blacked out" city also maybe a "target indicator" of some sort, so electric fast on/off has a huge advantage in my opinion.  

The list on my original post was an "ad hoc"  one, I have already lots of equipment by myself and also "inherited" expedition equipment from my deceased archaeology Professor. So most angels are already covered, because I have only a relative small flat (56m2)  and a small cellar (10m2) I cannot stockpile that much! But I have shopping lists if there is a little warning before SHTF. 

A real shooting war in the Middle East on Syrian ground, spilling into Turkey and Iraq, maybe also Iran/Israel via Lebanon Hisbollah and Israel retaliating against Iran. So massive refugee wave into Europa and also tension/ fights between the foreign fractions here, with lost rule of law at least short term on various places, more unlikely Russia against it neighbors or Nato against Russia.  

Or a real spike in oil price  (we are at 80 $ already) or shortage (stalled transport in the strait of Hormuz?) with the triggering of a recession or financial breakdown by economic war measures or hacking, who knows? For sure we live in volatile times!

How likely this all may be, or severe it will become, I can not guess. This is for preplanning purposes as the situation unfolds. 

ds posted:

Maybe its only "German Angst"  

Not at all!  Where I live in the U.S. we don’t have hurricanes, volcanoes, or Russians to worry about but I know plenty of people who have plans to deal with life’s little oopsies.   They are the people you won’t see on the evening news in pajamas and a blanket being rescued by the government and headed to a refugee camp.

We have in Germany also a lively "Prepper Scene", partly to brag on YouTube about "the latest" in equipment or as a hobby, seldom as a lifestyle. From down to earth people to delusional "wannabe street nomads a la Mad Max" who want to grab their bug out bag and run into the wilds... Hmm, we haven't wilds in Germany, or we have two: High alpine range of the alps and the mud flat of the northern sea - half a day under water! The rest is cultural land, in Germany the hunting is with the land, so the hunters have mostly leased their "Revier", they have already:

Guns & ammo, scopes and hunting & shooting skills (they had to demonstrate this in theory and practice to get their hunting license).

local knowledge of the wild animals there and the terrain and other resources 

and will not be keen have their game taken by other people or them stumbling around disturbing it!

So one has to have other plans!

We have even as a last remain from the cold war times the Civil Emergency Reserve of the Federal Republic of Germany , it serves to supply the population in a crisis situation. These emergency supplies of staple foods are designed to provide the population with a daily meal in times of crisis. The food industry usually has no large stocks, on the other hand, agricultural products "can not be produced out of state". The Civil Emergency Reserve includes storage of long and round grain rice as well as peas and lentils. In addition, condensed milk and whole milk powder are stored. To protect against looting in a crisis, the locations in Germany are secret. Responsible for storage and health maintenance of supplies is the Federal Agency for Agriculture and Food (BLE).

The BLE also maintains the federal reserve grain, which consists of wheat, oats and rye, and should maintain the supply of flour and bread in an emergency. 

In the federal budget for 2013, the probable costs of the Civil Emergency Reserve and the Federal Reserve cereals with a total of 15.45 million euros - two-thirds of which for the storage - are shown. In both reserves together about 800,000 tons of food (about 9.7 kg / German citizens) stored at about 150 locations. In the event of a crisis, the population in metropolitan areas in particular should be provided with at least one daily meal via communal catering facilities.  The food in both reserves together has a value of about 200 million euros. [from German Wikipedia]   

Problem with this is distribution, today more than in the 1950ies to 1990ies because every thing and the kitchen sink is already controlled by the internet and this needs electricity and communication lines, even mobile services are wireless only to the next antenna! 

Or civilisation is a lot more fragile than most people think - even most politicians. Anarchy is only 9 meal (3 days) away maybe less, the sheeple will recognize soon that they can not eat their phone if the pizza service does not deliver any longer... or if they get real thirsty first time in their lives and the water service is out of order and the shops empty! 

I was in the garage yesterday afternoon and took stock of some things.  Sleeping bags at an easily reached spot on my shelving.  A propane powered stove and lantern at the ready with a dozen bottles of propane. A large tote box with canned food, which probably needs restocking as some is most likely passed expiration date. I've got work to do. Vehicles are in good shape, ready to go at a moments notice.  I have maps of the backroads in my area so I could escape and be 75 miles away without traveling on any paved roads. I have a hillside  with views of at least a mile of all traffic approaching from any direction, with a flat area just below the crest and on the non-windy side to set up camp. It is reachable by those dirt backroads from my home. I do need to figure out some form of fuel storage and transportation solutions.

Mojo/Mark
__________________________
Yo homey, is that my briefcase...?
Vincent from "Collateral"
__________________________
You want the good life, you break your back, you snap your fingers, you snap your neck... Prong/Demon Hunter

Joined: 9/30/09
Location: Northern Nevada (Reno/Sparks)

Gas for vehicle. this is may so take a 5 gallon can use a sharpie and write a large 5 on all sides. Fill it with fuel and add Sta-Bil. Next month do the same but mark it with a 6 continue till you have 60 gal. Next year dump gas in car refill can. Personal experience says you may need more gas then what is in your tank to get out of a localized disaster event. Plan accordingly.

 

Witch

witch posted:

Gas for vehicle. this is may so take a 5 gallon can use a sharpie and write a large 5 on all sides. Fill it with fuel and add Sta-Bil. Next month do the same but mark it with a 6 continue till you have 60 gal. Next year dump gas in car refill can. Personal experience says you may need more gas then what is in your tank to get out of a localized disaster event. Plan accordingly.

 

Thanks. Good ideas there. Now, what containers are you using? Plastic, metal? Any specific brands or type I should be looking for?

Mojo/Mark
__________________________
Yo homey, is that my briefcase...?
Vincent from "Collateral"
__________________________
You want the good life, you break your back, you snap your fingers, you snap your neck... Prong/Demon Hunter

Joined: 9/30/09
Location: Northern Nevada (Reno/Sparks)

MOJONIXON posted:
witch posted:

Gas for vehicle. this is may so take a 5 gallon can use a sharpie and

...

Thanks. Good ideas there. Now, what containers are you using? Plastic, metal? Any specific brands or type I should be looking for?

Go here https://www.jerrycan <DOT> com/  They are probably the best on the market today.  Military cans work fine but the wide mouth is designed for a different era.  They are made by Wavian.

The CARB-EPA approved spout needs to be lubed and exercised a few times to work well.  There are non-approved spouts on the market.

Why metal instead of plastic?  Gasoline melts most plastics and the ones that are fuel resistant are heavy and expensive.  Also, the gasoline evaporates, no matter how well the container is sealed.

You may want to get 2.5 gallon cans if you or your significant other is strength challenged.

Now, how do you store it?  I absolutely will not have a filled gas can inside my home.  

@Witch, can you elaborate on your storage scheme?  Are the numbers the month it was filled?

How would you transfer fuel from one vehicle fuel tank to yours?  For example, our sedan usually has some fuel in it.  How would I transfer it from the sedan directly to the pickup truck?   Please don't say a siphon hose.  Gasoline is poisonous .

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

Thanks TA. There are siphon hoses that have a hand crank pump in the middle of 2 sections of hose. 

Mojo/Mark
__________________________
Yo homey, is that my briefcase...?
Vincent from "Collateral"
__________________________
You want the good life, you break your back, you snap your fingers, you snap your neck... Prong/Demon Hunter

Joined: 9/30/09
Location: Northern Nevada (Reno/Sparks)

MOJONIXON posted:
witch posted:

Gas for vehicle. this is may so take a 5 gallon can use a sharpie and write a large 5 on all sides. Fill it with fuel and add Sta-Bil. Next month do the same but mark it with a 6 continue till you have 60 gal. Next year dump gas in car refill can. Personal experience says you may need more gas then what is in your tank to get out of a localized disaster event. Plan accordingly.

 

Thanks. Good ideas there. Now, what containers are you using? Plastic, metal? Any specific brands or type I should be looking for?

I use what is at the store, really 5 gal plastic trapezoidal cans mostly. I am looking for few Jerry type cans to supplement though.

 

Witch

I wound up with a hodgepodge of ww2 Jerry cans, scepter cans and Nato cans. The scepter ones are hands down my favorite to deal with, very well sealed and very forgiving of rough treatment. You can use a military nozzle and funnel, or there are civilian adapters for them.

Next best are the Nato cans. The cam lock is a good tight seal, they're well made and sturdy but sometimes weep at the seam if old and worn out. Never really had rust issues with these. The Chinese copies are not the same, and often have weeping and rust issues out of the gate.

Lastly I would put the USGI WW2 style Jerry. We used these into the eighties but the design leaves a lot to be desired. The mouth is threaded, and it seals ok. Unfortunately on these the  bottom seams are very prone to rust. These were issued with bare steel inside, so a gas tank liner like redkote is a good idea. The civilian copies are about as good as the issue ones here, but different dimensions and thread pitch on the nozzle, so they are not interchangeable between the two. There was also a steel water can which did have a tan ceramic liner, these have a very wide mouth and rust in the same places as the as ones.

There is also the scepter water can. I keep one of those and a Bundeswehr "trinkwasser" can in the cellar as general supplies, change them out yearly. No issues with either sincestheyre both plastic, and pretty high quality. I have had tornadoes here 3 years in a row, two got within a mile of me but just rustled the shingles a bit.

Keepshooting dot com has a French version of the water can for cheap that is supposed to be very nice.

There are many options but the military stuff us designed to stack and store in fuel dumps. I just happened to have a fair amount of experience with these from restoring .mil vehicles and general overlanding.

Learn how to talk and how to fight, if you can't do one you'll be doing a lot of the other.

Somewhere in my readings of old field manuals I ran across a little gem for fuel can maintenance.   Take a quart of motor oil and pour it into the fuel can.  Close tightly.  Rotate the fuel can so that the oil coats all surfaces.  Pour oil into the next can.  Repeat until all the cans are treated.

I decided to bite the bullet and bought a set of Wavians from jerrycan <DOT> com.  Labeled and stenciled with my name and contents.  I took a black sharpie and highlighted the stampings so that they are easy to read.  I included a couple 2.64gallon cans for the car and a black can for oil and small engine applications.  They also have these in stock:

@masterchief, can you tell us how you refurbish your fuel cans?  Is there a tutorial?  I have several USMC fuel cans in fair condition.  They need gaskets, chains and fresh paint.

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

That's about it. If the interior is rusty, I use muriatic acid to eat away the rust, neutralize with baking soda. Then coat with your preferred tank liner. I've used redkote with good results but it can stain your fuel red if it's in there for a while. Doesn't affect usability but red dye means Agricultural only Diesel in the US so be careful there. The liner both prevents rust and gives you a little leeway on spot of the can that are not *quite* pinholes yet, but could be.

New rubber gaskets, prime and paint the outside (POR-15 and Gillespie paint is my go-to combo for seriously heavy duty paint ). Done.

Learn how to talk and how to fight, if you can't do one you'll be doing a lot of the other.

Trajan Aurelius posted:

Somewhere in my readings of old field manuals I ran across a little gem for fuel can maintenance.   Take a quart of motor oil and pour it into the fuel can.  Close tightly.  Rotate the fuel can so that the oil coats all surfaces.  Pour oil into the next can.  Repeat until all the cans are treated.

...

@masterchief, can you tell us how you refurbish your fuel cans?  Is there a tutorial?  I have several USMC fuel cans in fair condition.  They need gaskets, chains and fresh paint.

http://www.105th <DOT> org/cleaning/watercans.html will take you to a page where one reenactor  desribeds how he rehabilitates fuel cans.

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

One of you fine folks will probably be able to answer this. I have a bunch of old military cans that don't leak and I'd love to make use of them. They are a PITA to pour out of and into a funnel, so I'd like to buy a proper nozzle. I just don't know what the design is called...Jerry can? NATO can? Scepter can? Best I can describe is a round hole, roughly 3-4" diameter, with a threaded cap.

Looking online, I see some nozzles that appear to be for oval-shaped holes, some with spring-loaded looking contraptions, but none that are just plain threaded like I would imagine I need.

NorthernPhoenix posted:

One of you fine folks will probably be able to answer this. I have a bunch of old military cans that don't leak and I'd love to make use of them.

...

I'd like to buy a proper nozzle. 

...

Check in with @Bill, Idaho.  He may have a line on them.

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

In my lane (for once)...If you have standard 5 gallon metal "Jerry cans" with the 2 3/4" threads (that is the fuel can, either mogas or diesel, the metal 5 gallon water cans have an entirely different lid), then you need to figure if you want the original sized flexible spout (about an inch in diameter) or a newer smaller spout (about 3/4" in diameter)  for most newer vehicles.    Most of the larger earlier ones are threaded to screw right into the can, some have a rubber seal that is tightened down by means of a cam-lock affair.  I don't know if it is the age showing or the poorer design, but those clamp on things virtually always leak.     (Trivia tid-bit for the day---military jerry cans have the same thread as a 55 gallon barrel, known as a "bung" thread, hence the term "bung hole"-not to be confused with the other reference to a "bung-hole".   Just sayin".)  Oh yeah, it doesn't matter if the cap has "rolled" or simply bent up ears- the gov used both over the years, but the threads are the same.  Some people say if it has the straight bent up ears it is a civilian can, but that is not accurate.  And speaking of water cans, once the inner lining compromises and starts to  come off, about the only thing you can do if you still want to use it for water is to line it with one of the current coatings available.  And I learned real quick in my LE career to always check a rig that has a water can strapped on the rig.   A person can fill one with ice and beer, and be able to reach down inside to fetch them, unlike a gas can. 

       All of the above mentioned are pretty easy to find and not expensive.    Most "surplus stores" have them.   Certainly they are available online.  

  I have read in a certain state where everything in the world is illegal, they sell only weird gas cans with a spout system that requires a degree in mechanical engineering to use.  If you happen to live in that aforementioned state, you're on your own.   You probably can't buy the spouts much less the jerry cans anymore.

What about the racing fuel cans that they sell on amazon etc? They don't have the silly child proof nozzle on them.   

“Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send me!’”
"Fuck the know it alls.They don't have to do it, and don't have the balls to do it"

Pat Rogers.

Bill, Idaho posted:

In my lane (for once)...

...

  If you happen to live in that aforementioned state, you're on your own.   You probably can't buy the spouts much less the jerry cans anymore.

Yes, yes you can.  As late as last week.

 

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

I agree with WITCH. Siphon hose is the way to go. For ease of use as well as security.

I've got jerry cans that I rotate through every 6 months, and I've timed how long it takes to empty one into the tank of my SUV. 5 min, which is a lot of time to have both hands occupied. I prefer the siphon option as I can set it up to transfer, and then be free to set security. I live in an area where forest fires and mandatory evacuation are likely, and the last thing I want is someone deciding they want to "borrow" some of my fuel while I'm tied up transferring some into my tank. 

I bought some of the AB NATO cans a few years ago and give them two thumbs up.  I keep them stored up off the ground on a rack, and they have held up well.  The best part is they don't release vapors like most of the civilian plastic ones do.  This means I can put them in the back of the SUV to drive to and from the gas station without sucking down gas fumes the entire way back.

They do take a while to dump into your tank using a spout at the end of hurricane season.  I like the idea of using a siphon, especially if I'm doing this on the road.  The super siphon https://www.amazon.com/Safety-...ywords=shaker+siphon I've heard works well.  I'm going to have to buy a couple and keep them with my cans.

I use the racing fuel jugs for my thirsty ass offroad vehicles. They dump super fast (less than a minute for 5 gallons) and are easy to secure in the back of the truck. The racing jugs are pretty cheap in the grand scheme of things and last for quite a while. 

No matter which containers you use, making a substitute nozzle or having backups on hand is a great idea. You also may need a funnel or proprietary type device to get fuel into certain vehicles. Something like This Nozzle is very easy to make. It gives you the smooth surface to slide into the fuel filler neck, clear tubing to view the fuel transferring for contaminants, a small screen type filter, and a cap. I run these on my racing jugs only when I'm pouring fuel and keep a few spares around. I also have some regular fuel can caps that I've modified similar to this, which eliminates that CARB bullshit that dumps fuel everywhere. 

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