I was looking through Arctic1's "Big Winter Gear Thread" and it struck me that I don't have chains for my truck.

What are you doing to get ready for the cold weather.  And yes, I am looking for recommendations.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Original Post
Linz posted:

"Cold weather"  You mean when drops under 18C?

Hehehe.  More like when water falls to the ground at a temperature fit for a martini.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Trajan Aurelius posted:
Linz posted:

"Cold weather"  You mean when drops under 18C?

Hehehe.  More like when water falls to the ground at a temperature fit for a martini.

Damn- the nitrogen can't be too far behind.

Still good question: sooner or hater I'm going to hit sub-zero...with or without snow.

If you want the best, here they are:

 

http://www.spikes-spiders.com

 

They are expensive.  But are the best/easiest/longest lasting.  I do not own a set, but a few neighbors do.  They're on my list.  For now, I buy the cheap cable sets from the local store as cheaply as I can.  The reason is that none of them last long until you get into REAL chains and REAL money.  I just buy a new set every other season or so.  Even those cheap cable chains do better on ice than 4wd will.  Where I live, our snow has a very high water content, so it turns to ice (we call it Sierra cement) as soon as it gets more than an inch deep.

 

Other than that, I'm stacking wood.  A lot of fucking wood.

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

I have a 2WD Dodge long box. With an HO  Cummins.  If there is one flake of snow within about three Idaho counties, I am stuck.  So, with that being said, I bought a pair of extra steel wheels and had a pair of gnarly off-road tires mounted, and install them about the end of November.   ( I usually find chains at the local thrift stores for next to nothing.)     I place four 20mm ammo cans full of empty reloading brass in the bed and tie them down with ratcheting straps. (The brass is all I had handy.)   Each one is about 150-200 pounds.  With those two winterizing tips, I can get around on the roads pretty good. I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.  One thing I did "update" was I found a bunch of orange colored emergency distress smoke bombs at a local boating shop. They were beyond their marked expiration date by about 6 months, but every one I ever tried worked perfect.

 

With 4WD do chains go on all four wheels or front or rear?

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Bill, Idaho posted:

I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.

 

Shovel, MREs, cooler with water, wool blankets, extra clothes, orange tarp (signaling), hand/foot warmers (will also thaw a frozen fuel line)

If you have a pickup truck, don't shovel the snow out of the bed. It adds weight right over the rear wheels.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

Trajan Aurelius posted:

With 4WD do chains go on all four wheels or front or rear?

If you're definitely going to be using 4wd, then all four tires in chains gets you the best traction, steering , braking, and lateral control.  

 

If you're not sure if you'll be using 4wd, then just rear (assuming rear wheel drive).  You can still use 4wd at that point, but steering and breaking suffer.  Slow speed is your friend here.

 

Personally, I'll put only rear on, then forgo 4wd in all but the worst conditions.  

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

Think of it this way.  

 

4wd gets you twice as good over 2wd.  Rubber sucks on snow and ice.  So 4wd gets you twice as good as really shitty in those conditions.  So you're still in shitty mode with just 4wd on snow and ice.  With chains, you add the traction that rubber lacks.  However, in 4wd, you're still only getting half the drive tires to have good traction.  The front "unchained" drive tires now have shitty traction.  Chaining all 4 gives you the best.

 

But......if you leave it in 2wd, ALL of your drive tires have good traction.  You only lack the benefit of better steering and lateral control (breaking also somewhat as you'll be 100% relying on the rear tires).

 

So..... all 4 chained in 4wd is best, rear in 2wd is a good compromise, no chains but 4wd is silly unless you got caught unprepared.  Slow WAY down and you greatly increase the chances of success.  Gearing does come into play, but to simplify, go low and slow.

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

Malpaso posted:
Bill, Idaho posted:

I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.

 

Shovel, MREs, cooler with water, wool blankets, extra clothes, orange tarp (signaling), hand/foot warmers (will also thaw a frozen fuel line)

If you have a pickup truck, don't shovel the snow out of the bed. It adds weight right over the rear wheels.

Do you have problems with batteries freezing as well?

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Linz posted:

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Blankets are more versatile than sleeping bags, especially if you have to lie on the nasty, wet, dirty ground to fix the fucking truck.  When it's really cold I can block the radiator with it and if I trash it, no pain.  I have both, the sleeping bag being either a SnugPak or a casualty evacuation bag depending on where I am going.  Two people can fit in it if the are willing .

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Yeah, I keep a couple of sleeping bags as well.    A handful of those2"x25' tow straps. Some shackles and a few other rigging items.  

    With a few cb/ham radios of various frequencies in my rig, I am not really concerned about being actually stranded for very long, but ya' never know......  

 Under the back seat I keep an extra field jacket, and a couple of sweatshirts.  Those get used probably more than anything else.   For example, we were at a Halloween thing a few weeks ago, and it was a little colder than we (they)  expected.   My wife and another couple that was with us started bitching about being cold.    A quick return trip to the pickup solved the problem, and all involved were appreciative.   They saved the day, even if it was something simple. It took everyone's mind off of one minor thing, and let us enjoy the day. 

       I also keep a handful of various reflective vests and related gear.  Those come in handy when outside the rig on a busy road.    

  One thing I did top my rig when I got it was install my own yellow lights up inside the topper shell facing back. I wired them into the emergency flashers, and wired them with a "wig-wag" type of flasher.  So, when I turn on the 4-way flashers, from the rear there is an additional two lights flashing inside the rear window.    It  multiplies the effect of the standard two tail-lights flashing.    They are taller than the regular tail lights as well.   (I am thinking of adding two LED  yellow lights behind the front grill, so that way they are pretty well out of sight unless they are on.  

Since CT  does not exactly miles and miles of backroads and wilderness and since what little we may have , I do not live near, I never gave much thought.  Help was always close I figured. 

Then during our epic winter storm a few years ago, I found out how wrong I was.  There were people stranded on the highway...in the very middle of Hartford...that were there for 16 hours dead stop.  Cars ran out of gas, so no heat.  People had no food, no water, no bathroom.  Most importantly, people who figured they would be home in a few minutes had none of their daily medicines...or even a candy bar for diabetics.

They were literally within a 3 wood of restaurants, bars, hotels and a CVS, yet they were stuck on an elevated section of the highway.  What a clusterfuck.  No one died but it was horrible to read about as some people thought they were going to die within sight of their job or home.

After that, I prepared a little kit.  Takes up hardly any space and has been there for years.  I can't remember everything but here's some, all in one of those awesome Eagle helicopter crew bags that Geronimo has once mentioned:

-Medical kit, more for every day thing, not GSWs.  That's separate.  Has a 2 day package of my everyday meds that I rotate, and basic boo-boo kit items.

-Victorinox Swisschamp with their survival kit. 

-Butane lighters, fixed blade knife, folding shovel (not a Spetznaz one though)

-A Stanley FUBAR.  Trust me, you NEED one of these.

- HK 26.5mm flare gun with 8 1500' reach parachute flares.  That'll get some attention.  Also, you can also shoot some miscreant in the chest and set him on fire if need be.  Yes, it is a dream of mine. Additionally, a couple of road flares.

-I also have a couple of blankets, water, snackie-snacks and a pair of boots.  I'm often in wingtips, not the best shoe to trudge around in when the weather is shitty.

When it's winter, I throw a couple of full sandbags in not so much for weight as they are to break open and spread on the ground if stuck.  Not as fancy as empty brass but I'm betting more effective.

Always make sure I don't dip below half a tank, wiper fluid topped off, tires good, phone always plugged into charger.  Basic shit.  Also, a spare work radio that I may have used my supervisory powers for to acquire for emergencies.

Finally, the usual assortment of guns, knives and ammo depending on the day, mood, destination, super moon, etc.

-------------------------

IT'S A COLT.  THEY'RE LIKE THE HK OF GUNS.

HRH (Ret.) The Most Reverend Consig

Stupidity is not a skillset.

I AM GROOT.

 

 

 

 

 Joined: 28 Nov 2004: 0037hrs        Location: The worst run state in the U.S

I currently only have one of those Cold Steel Shovels, jumper cables, a booboo kit, and a small tool box. That gets supplemented with a backpack daily that has a change of clothes and jacket, hand warmers, a second booboo kit, a beanie, and some other knick knacks. Now that its started getting colder I will toss a winter jacket and gloves into the backseat as well. 

I never let the gas tank get below half during the winter, well most the year actually. 

I keep wanting to add one of those self-jump boxes so I don't have to depend on another car, but I haven't looked into them enough to decide on one. When I get the funds I will add an extra jerry can of gas for longer trips too in winter just in case. 

I don't keep a thing of kitty litter or sand in the back anymore now that I have a 4wd Wrangler with limited space. 

And with consigs most now I want a flare gun just for shits and giggles. 

Also to add onto Consigs thoughts on personal meds, MOST insurances will pay for your meds 3-5 days early each month. All it takes is one month three days early to add a small stash. If they aren't controlled meds, you can also just buy a couple days worth out of pocket as long as you have the refills available, it'll just cost you more. 

--------------------------------------

Joined: 9/1/12

Linz posted:
Malpaso posted:
Bill, Idaho posted:

I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.

 

Shovel, MREs, cooler with water, wool blankets, extra clothes, orange tarp (signaling), hand/foot warmers (will also thaw a frozen fuel line)

If you have a pickup truck, don't shovel the snow out of the bed. It adds weight right over the rear wheels.

Do you have problems with batteries freezing as well?

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Never had a problem with a battery freezing.  The fuel line issue surfaced when we had a diesel generator running during a winter FTX in blizzard conditions. It was actually the fuel filter now that I think about it.

As far as a sleeping bag, yes, but I was only listing the extras I add during the winter. My regular vehicle inventory, like many others here, would warrant a new thread.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

I have 2 space blankets for each member of my family in EACH of our rigs in addition to what everyone here has posted. Glad to see I'm not the only one with a flare gun. Easy solution for most people is to get one of those offshore boating emergency kits as it will have everything you need nicely packed up in a well labeled and H2O proof container. They have 25yr shelf life survival food and water and a med kit

Space Blankets/Bags are the SCHIZNIT for making a vehicle comfortable in below zero weather taped to the ceiling, walls and floor as they reflect your body heat back to you instead of the windows/roof/doors/floor. and in short order will have you warm enough to the point you can de-layer some clothes. Don't forget to allow for ventilation and condensation.

If your vehicle battery is old, you can expect to have issues with it. I have those auxiliary phone battery cell things that hold a charge and can recharge your phone. If you get stuck the FIRST THING YOU DO is drop a pin via google maps in a text/email to several  friends/family so incase it goes completely sideways and you get busy trying not to die, they will at least know where to find your vehicle. If you tell yourself you will do it later fails to take into account you getting hurt or loss of comms of the situation deteriorates further.

Carry appropriate tools (mechanical and otherwise) for your immediate area and also the surrounding areas (because no one expects trouble on a "quick trip")

I also have 3 or 4 VC-17 panels in each rig and the big assed chemlights and a coupla LED flashlight AND headlamps (ever try changing a tire with only a handheld light?), because who doesn't want to be seen if you're stranded right?

Don't forget snacks, duct tape, 550 cord, murder plastic, shovel, paper note pad with sharpies and pencils and some books for you and the kiddos that will save your sanity while you wait for help.

Oh and don't forget toilet paper and gallon sized ziplock bags, for the same reason...

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

Malpaso posted:
Linz posted:

Do you have problems with batteries freezing as well?

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Never had a problem with a battery freezing.  The fuel line issue surfaced when we had a diesel generator running during a winter FTX in blizzard conditions. It was actually the fuel filter now that I think about it.

As far as a sleeping bag, yes, but I was only listing the extras I add during the winter. My regular vehicle inventory, like many others here, would warrant a new thread.

Thanks.

I can see I have a few updates if I expect to run into seriously cold weather.

I have pretty much the same things as everyone else.

I've always put about six pieces of tube sand in the bed of my truck even though I have 4WD.  I can always cut one open if I hit ice. Rain-X on all windows. Tools, clothes, food, water, first aid and medicine, and so on.

One thing that I learned long ago from my dad was to carry a dish soap bottle full of vinegar. When the windshield gets all shitty/grimy, a squirt of that onto the glass with the wipers will clean it off beautifully.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

yakc130 posted:

I have pretty much the same things as everyone else.

I've always put about six pieces of tube sand in the bed of my truck even though I have 4WD.  I can always cut one open if I hit ice. Rain-X on all windows. Tools, clothes, food, water, first aid and medicine, and so on.

One thing that I learned long ago from my dad was to carry a dish soap bottle full of vinegar. When the windshield gets all shitty/grimy, a squirt of that onto the glass with the wipers will clean it off beautifully.

Yakc130, can you describe "tube sand" in more detail.

I put a 1 pint of rubbing alcohol and 2 tablespoons of Dawn or car washing detergent in my windshield washer to cut through dead bugs, slush, frost and the occasional FSA snowflake that lands on my windshield.  That stuff never freezes.  It does have that rubbing alcohol smell ...

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Imagine a pre-made sand bag with 60 lbs of sand inside it shaped like a tube...

Quickrete and Sackrete make them and can be found at Lowe's and Walmart .  the biggest advantage to them is the LDPE liner inside the sandbag that keeps them from absorbing water and freezing solid.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

Does anyone carry fuel proof gloves for cold weather refueling?

Gasoline freezes at between -40 *F and -58*F.  I recall safety messages about not splashing super cold fuel on your skin to avoid flash freezing or on your clothes to prevent off-gassing and catching fire ...

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Fuel Handler Glove

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The gloves feature DIRECT GRIP® glove technology that combines barrier and liner to ensure protection while allowing you to perform a range of activities such as handling equipment and tools.

M. Wilson posted:

Imagine a pre-made sand bag with 60 lbs of sand inside it shaped like a tube...

Quickrete and Sackrete make them and can be found at Lowe's and Walmart .  the biggest advantage to them is the LDPE liner inside the sandbag that keeps them from absorbing water and freezing solid.

Yep. That's it.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

MWL posted:

Winter readiness you say?

Sure, I'm ready for winter!

Image result for girls in a hot tub winter

Regards.

Mark

I hereby declare Mark as fully proficient in the tiddlywink spirit.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Northern Montana perspective:

Batteries tend to freeze only when they are nearly fully discharged or near the end of their service lives. So the only ones we worry about here are those in equipment that will sit most of the winter without being run. For those batteries, one of the little 2 amp trickle chargers are hooked up and left on all winter. It is a cheap way to save a $250 dollar battery.

On the semi's, battery heaters do help with cold starts, but leaving the truck plugged in makes more difference. So each vehicle will have three plugins. One block heater, One oil pan heater, One paired cord going to the battery blanket on each battery. It costs about $3 a night, per truck. We will typically have two trucks plugged in, a plow tractor, and one or two utility tractors.

I have seen it cold enough that we had to fill an oil pan with charcoal brickettes, lit them and slide them under the vehicles oil pan for a few hours to get the engine block warm enough to crank over. One needs to wrap blankets or tarps around the front of the vehicle to keep the heat contained whan doing this.

 

On the subject of diesel engines, we keep a couple quarts of anti-gel in every vehicle and a quart of 9-11. We start treating the fuel at around 10F sustained. Below zero, we start and idle the engines for at least ten minutes to get the block warmed up and lubricants flowing. The trucks are equipped with fuel tank interheaters so this gives the fuel a chance to warm up as well. Each truck has a spare filter and filter wrench so that waxed up filter can be replaced if the 9-11 additive doesn't hit it fast enough. 

When the trucks come back at the end of the day, they are parked on a level surface with the brakes off/ chocks placed. This is because the frozen road slop will run into the brakes which are still warm from friction, then freeze over night. The remedy is a sledge hammer if you're lucky or a propane weed burner and ten minutes per brake if you're not. If you leave the brakes open the slop will run on through.

Winter does not make me nostalgic. But does keep the riffraff to a minimum here.

On the personal side, each member of the family has a A3 bag with winter stuff- snow pants, heavy jacket, beannie, mittens, Yak Traks, goggles, silk scarf, etc. This is in addition to the coat and hat gloves they brought to the Yukon with them. There are a couple sleeping bags and several blankets in the car along with a snow shovel, tow straps, comealong, bags of trail mix etc. That stuff stays in the vehicle from Oct-April.

 

MWL wins the thread drift award, and does so in stellar fashion

Longeye wins the "everyone else is in the tropics" award

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

My dad showed me pictures of setting a straw fire on the tractor engine in the 1940's.  This warmed the engine so that the kerosene used as fuel would ignite reliably.  It was winter and the snow was pretty deep.  He remembered the temperature as being 10-15*F as early as November in Tennessee's Cumberland River Valley.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

Malpaso posted:

MWL wins the thread drift award, and does so in stellar fashion

Longeye wins the "everyone else is in the tropics" award

Amen.  I thought life was bad when there was ice on my 'mog glass or the ute vinyl  cover cracked.

Im about 8-10 hrs north of Longeye.  I keep two shovels, a snow shovel, tow straps, blankets, extra gloves, mitts, toques, et al in the truck. Year round. 

Mounted the spare on the upper cargo rack on my taco. Crawling under a truck in the snow/mud sucks. Do not like. 

A set of oversize insulated coveralls is a great idea. Warm, and keeps snow/slop/road grime off you. 

Hi lift jack and numerous wood blocks. 

Only ever run full synthetic, only use -60 C rated windshield washer fluid. 

Always plug in the ol block heater. 

A toolbox in the bed, with numerous axes, hatchets, saws, tarps, etc etc inside. 

Full trauma kit, a booboo kit, and LBT go bag survival kit. 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-We are the sheepdogs, bad people looking out for the good people by killing worse people
-Don't get PTSD, Give PTSD. Make the taliban wake up screaming in the night because he fears Canadians are coming to Kill him.

-Location - Canada - Joined - 2006MAR19

One of those foam kids sleds are sweet to keep you off of the frozen ground changing a tire or having to be under a truck.

Reflectix "mylar  bubble wrap" insulation  you can find at Lowe's is even sweeter and it makes a kick assed ground mat for camping when you glue 3 or 4 layers together. I have also used it to put between the roof and the headliner on all of my vehicles because it works so well keeping the heat/cold away from my wife who will either freeze me or cool me to death depending on the season that I can remain reasonably comfortable. 2 layers with a 1.5 airgap is the same as an R21 fiberglass insulation  batt.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

I've been pretty cold in Southern Arizona.  Got snowed in once, too.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

“Governments may think and say as they like, but force cannot be eliminated, and it is the only real and unanswerable power. We are told that the pen is mightier than the sword, but I know which of these weapons I would choose.“   Lt. General Paul Carton de Wiart, British Army

 

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