I was looking through Arctic1's "Big Winter Gear Thread" and it struck me that I don't have chains for my truck.

What are you doing to get ready for the cold weather.  And yes, I am looking for recommendations.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Original Post
Linz posted:

"Cold weather"  You mean when drops under 18C?

Hehehe.  More like when water falls to the ground at a temperature fit for a martini.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Trajan Aurelius posted:
Linz posted:

"Cold weather"  You mean when drops under 18C?

Hehehe.  More like when water falls to the ground at a temperature fit for a martini.

Damn- the nitrogen can't be too far behind.

Still good question: sooner or hater I'm going to hit sub-zero...with or without snow.

If you want the best, here they are:

 

http://www.spikes-spiders.com

 

They are expensive.  But are the best/easiest/longest lasting.  I do not own a set, but a few neighbors do.  They're on my list.  For now, I buy the cheap cable sets from the local store as cheaply as I can.  The reason is that none of them last long until you get into REAL chains and REAL money.  I just buy a new set every other season or so.  Even those cheap cable chains do better on ice than 4wd will.  Where I live, our snow has a very high water content, so it turns to ice (we call it Sierra cement) as soon as it gets more than an inch deep.

 

Other than that, I'm stacking wood.  A lot of fucking wood.

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

I have a 2WD Dodge long box. With an HO  Cummins.  If there is one flake of snow within about three Idaho counties, I am stuck.  So, with that being said, I bought a pair of extra steel wheels and had a pair of gnarly off-road tires mounted, and install them about the end of November.   ( I usually find chains at the local thrift stores for next to nothing.)     I place four 20mm ammo cans full of empty reloading brass in the bed and tie them down with ratcheting straps. (The brass is all I had handy.)   Each one is about 150-200 pounds.  With those two winterizing tips, I can get around on the roads pretty good. I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.  One thing I did "update" was I found a bunch of orange colored emergency distress smoke bombs at a local boating shop. They were beyond their marked expiration date by about 6 months, but every one I ever tried worked perfect.

 

With 4WD do chains go on all four wheels or front or rear?

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Bill, Idaho posted:

I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.

 

Shovel, MREs, cooler with water, wool blankets, extra clothes, orange tarp (signaling), hand/foot warmers (will also thaw a frozen fuel line)

If you have a pickup truck, don't shovel the snow out of the bed. It adds weight right over the rear wheels.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

Trajan Aurelius posted:

With 4WD do chains go on all four wheels or front or rear?

If you're definitely going to be using 4wd, then all four tires in chains gets you the best traction, steering , braking, and lateral control.  

 

If you're not sure if you'll be using 4wd, then just rear (assuming rear wheel drive).  You can still use 4wd at that point, but steering and breaking suffer.  Slow speed is your friend here.

 

Personally, I'll put only rear on, then forgo 4wd in all but the worst conditions.  

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

Think of it this way.  

 

4wd gets you twice as good over 2wd.  Rubber sucks on snow and ice.  So 4wd gets you twice as good as really shitty in those conditions.  So you're still in shitty mode with just 4wd on snow and ice.  With chains, you add the traction that rubber lacks.  However, in 4wd, you're still only getting half the drive tires to have good traction.  The front "unchained" drive tires now have shitty traction.  Chaining all 4 gives you the best.

 

But......if you leave it in 2wd, ALL of your drive tires have good traction.  You only lack the benefit of better steering and lateral control (breaking also somewhat as you'll be 100% relying on the rear tires).

 

So..... all 4 chained in 4wd is best, rear in 2wd is a good compromise, no chains but 4wd is silly unless you got caught unprepared.  Slow WAY down and you greatly increase the chances of success.  Gearing does come into play, but to simplify, go low and slow.

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

Malpaso posted:
Bill, Idaho posted:

I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.

 

Shovel, MREs, cooler with water, wool blankets, extra clothes, orange tarp (signaling), hand/foot warmers (will also thaw a frozen fuel line)

If you have a pickup truck, don't shovel the snow out of the bed. It adds weight right over the rear wheels.

Do you have problems with batteries freezing as well?

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Linz posted:

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Blankets are more versatile than sleeping bags, especially if you have to lie on the nasty, wet, dirty ground to fix the fucking truck.  When it's really cold I can block the radiator with it and if I trash it, no pain.  I have both, the sleeping bag being either a SnugPak or a casualty evacuation bag depending on where I am going.  Two people can fit in it if the are willing .

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Yeah, I keep a couple of sleeping bags as well.    A handful of those2"x25' tow straps. Some shackles and a few other rigging items.  

    With a few cb/ham radios of various frequencies in my rig, I am not really concerned about being actually stranded for very long, but ya' never know......  

 Under the back seat I keep an extra field jacket, and a couple of sweatshirts.  Those get used probably more than anything else.   For example, we were at a Halloween thing a few weeks ago, and it was a little colder than we (they)  expected.   My wife and another couple that was with us started bitching about being cold.    A quick return trip to the pickup solved the problem, and all involved were appreciative.   They saved the day, even if it was something simple. It took everyone's mind off of one minor thing, and let us enjoy the day. 

       I also keep a handful of various reflective vests and related gear.  Those come in handy when outside the rig on a busy road.    

  One thing I did top my rig when I got it was install my own yellow lights up inside the topper shell facing back. I wired them into the emergency flashers, and wired them with a "wig-wag" type of flasher.  So, when I turn on the 4-way flashers, from the rear there is an additional two lights flashing inside the rear window.    It  multiplies the effect of the standard two tail-lights flashing.    They are taller than the regular tail lights as well.   (I am thinking of adding two LED  yellow lights behind the front grill, so that way they are pretty well out of sight unless they are on.  

Since CT  does not exactly miles and miles of backroads and wilderness and since what little we may have , I do not live near, I never gave much thought.  Help was always close I figured. 

Then during our epic winter storm a few years ago, I found out how wrong I was.  There were people stranded on the highway...in the very middle of Hartford...that were there for 16 hours dead stop.  Cars ran out of gas, so no heat.  People had no food, no water, no bathroom.  Most importantly, people who figured they would be home in a few minutes had none of their daily medicines...or even a candy bar for diabetics.

They were literally within a 3 wood of restaurants, bars, hotels and a CVS, yet they were stuck on an elevated section of the highway.  What a clusterfuck.  No one died but it was horrible to read about as some people thought they were going to die within sight of their job or home.

After that, I prepared a little kit.  Takes up hardly any space and has been there for years.  I can't remember everything but here's some, all in one of those awesome Eagle helicopter crew bags that Geronimo has once mentioned:

-Medical kit, more for every day thing, not GSWs.  That's separate.  Has a 2 day package of my everyday meds that I rotate, and basic boo-boo kit items.

-Victorinox Swisschamp with their survival kit. 

-Butane lighters, fixed blade knife, folding shovel (not a Spetznaz one though)

-A Stanley FUBAR.  Trust me, you NEED one of these.

- HK 26.5mm flare gun with 8 1500' reach parachute flares.  That'll get some attention.  Also, you can also shoot some miscreant in the chest and set him on fire if need be.  Yes, it is a dream of mine. Additionally, a couple of road flares.

-I also have a couple of blankets, water, snackie-snacks and a pair of boots.  I'm often in wingtips, not the best shoe to trudge around in when the weather is shitty.

When it's winter, I throw a couple of full sandbags in not so much for weight as they are to break open and spread on the ground if stuck.  Not as fancy as empty brass but I'm betting more effective.

Always make sure I don't dip below half a tank, wiper fluid topped off, tires good, phone always plugged into charger.  Basic shit.  Also, a spare work radio that I may have used my supervisory powers for to acquire for emergencies.

Finally, the usual assortment of guns, knives and ammo depending on the day, mood, destination, super moon, etc.

-------------------------

IT'S A COLT.  THEY'RE LIKE THE HK OF GUNS.

HRH (Ret.) The Most Reverend Consig

Stupidity is not a skillset.

I AM GROOT.

 

 

 

 

 Joined: 28 Nov 2004: 0037hrs        Location: The worst run state in the U.S

I currently only have one of those Cold Steel Shovels, jumper cables, a booboo kit, and a small tool box. That gets supplemented with a backpack daily that has a change of clothes and jacket, hand warmers, a second booboo kit, a beanie, and some other knick knacks. Now that its started getting colder I will toss a winter jacket and gloves into the backseat as well. 

I never let the gas tank get below half during the winter, well most the year actually. 

I keep wanting to add one of those self-jump boxes so I don't have to depend on another car, but I haven't looked into them enough to decide on one. When I get the funds I will add an extra jerry can of gas for longer trips too in winter just in case. 

I don't keep a thing of kitty litter or sand in the back anymore now that I have a 4wd Wrangler with limited space. 

And with consigs most now I want a flare gun just for shits and giggles. 

Also to add onto Consigs thoughts on personal meds, MOST insurances will pay for your meds 3-5 days early each month. All it takes is one month three days early to add a small stash. If they aren't controlled meds, you can also just buy a couple days worth out of pocket as long as you have the refills available, it'll just cost you more. 

--------------------------------------

Joined: 9/1/12

Linz posted:
Malpaso posted:
Bill, Idaho posted:

I always keep a bunch of "emergency" gear in the back seat area. 

  That consists of an old medium ALICE pack with some MRE's, heavy clothing, blankets, that kind of stuff.

 

Shovel, MREs, cooler with water, wool blankets, extra clothes, orange tarp (signaling), hand/foot warmers (will also thaw a frozen fuel line)

If you have a pickup truck, don't shovel the snow out of the bed. It adds weight right over the rear wheels.

Do you have problems with batteries freezing as well?

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Never had a problem with a battery freezing.  The fuel line issue surfaced when we had a diesel generator running during a winter FTX in blizzard conditions. It was actually the fuel filter now that I think about it.

As far as a sleeping bag, yes, but I was only listing the extras I add during the winter. My regular vehicle inventory, like many others here, would warrant a new thread.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

I have 2 space blankets for each member of my family in EACH of our rigs in addition to what everyone here has posted. Glad to see I'm not the only one with a flare gun. Easy solution for most people is to get one of those offshore boating emergency kits as it will have everything you need nicely packed up in a well labeled and H2O proof container. They have 25yr shelf life survival food and water and a med kit

Space Blankets/Bags are the SCHIZNIT for making a vehicle comfortable in below zero weather taped to the ceiling, walls and floor as they reflect your body heat back to you instead of the windows/roof/doors/floor. and in short order will have you warm enough to the point you can de-layer some clothes. Don't forget to allow for ventilation and condensation.

If your vehicle battery is old, you can expect to have issues with it. I have those auxiliary phone battery cell things that hold a charge and can recharge your phone. If you get stuck the FIRST THING YOU DO is drop a pin via google maps in a text/email to several  friends/family so incase it goes completely sideways and you get busy trying not to die, they will at least know where to find your vehicle. If you tell yourself you will do it later fails to take into account you getting hurt or loss of comms of the situation deteriorates further.

Carry appropriate tools (mechanical and otherwise) for your immediate area and also the surrounding areas (because no one expects trouble on a "quick trip")

I also have 3 or 4 VC-17 panels in each rig and the big assed chemlights and a coupla LED flashlight AND headlamps (ever try changing a tire with only a handheld light?), because who doesn't want to be seen if you're stranded right?

Don't forget snacks, duct tape, 550 cord, murder plastic, shovel, paper note pad with sharpies and pencils and some books for you and the kiddos that will save your sanity while you wait for help.

Oh and don't forget toilet paper and gallon sized ziplock bags, for the same reason...

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

Malpaso posted:
Linz posted:

Do you have problems with batteries freezing as well?

Also, wool blankets are mentioned by a couple here but not sleeping bags?

Never had a problem with a battery freezing.  The fuel line issue surfaced when we had a diesel generator running during a winter FTX in blizzard conditions. It was actually the fuel filter now that I think about it.

As far as a sleeping bag, yes, but I was only listing the extras I add during the winter. My regular vehicle inventory, like many others here, would warrant a new thread.

Thanks.

I can see I have a few updates if I expect to run into seriously cold weather.

I have pretty much the same things as everyone else.

I've always put about six pieces of tube sand in the bed of my truck even though I have 4WD.  I can always cut one open if I hit ice. Rain-X on all windows. Tools, clothes, food, water, first aid and medicine, and so on.

One thing that I learned long ago from my dad was to carry a dish soap bottle full of vinegar. When the windshield gets all shitty/grimy, a squirt of that onto the glass with the wipers will clean it off beautifully.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

yakc130 posted:

I have pretty much the same things as everyone else.

I've always put about six pieces of tube sand in the bed of my truck even though I have 4WD.  I can always cut one open if I hit ice. Rain-X on all windows. Tools, clothes, food, water, first aid and medicine, and so on.

One thing that I learned long ago from my dad was to carry a dish soap bottle full of vinegar. When the windshield gets all shitty/grimy, a squirt of that onto the glass with the wipers will clean it off beautifully.

Yakc130, can you describe "tube sand" in more detail.

I put a 1 pint of rubbing alcohol and 2 tablespoons of Dawn or car washing detergent in my windshield washer to cut through dead bugs, slush, frost and the occasional FSA snowflake that lands on my windshield.  That stuff never freezes.  It does have that rubbing alcohol smell ...

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Imagine a pre-made sand bag with 60 lbs of sand inside it shaped like a tube...

Quickrete and Sackrete make them and can be found at Lowe's and Walmart .  the biggest advantage to them is the LDPE liner inside the sandbag that keeps them from absorbing water and freezing solid.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

Does anyone carry fuel proof gloves for cold weather refueling?

Gasoline freezes at between -40 *F and -58*F.  I recall safety messages about not splashing super cold fuel on your skin to avoid flash freezing or on your clothes to prevent off-gassing and catching fire ...

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Fuel Handler Glove

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The GORE-TEX® glove liners keep your hands dry and comfortable by allowing your perspiration vapor to escape while repelling wind, rain, and snow. These liners also keep your hands odor-free by preventing fumes from JP-8 and other POLs from entering the glove.

The gloves feature DIRECT GRIP® glove technology that combines barrier and liner to ensure protection while allowing you to perform a range of activities such as handling equipment and tools.

M. Wilson posted:

Imagine a pre-made sand bag with 60 lbs of sand inside it shaped like a tube...

Quickrete and Sackrete make them and can be found at Lowe's and Walmart .  the biggest advantage to them is the LDPE liner inside the sandbag that keeps them from absorbing water and freezing solid.

Yep. That's it.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

MWL posted:

Winter readiness you say?

Sure, I'm ready for winter!

Image result for girls in a hot tub winter

Regards.

Mark

I hereby declare Mark as fully proficient in the tiddlywink spirit.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Northern Montana perspective:

Batteries tend to freeze only when they are nearly fully discharged or near the end of their service lives. So the only ones we worry about here are those in equipment that will sit most of the winter without being run. For those batteries, one of the little 2 amp trickle chargers are hooked up and left on all winter. It is a cheap way to save a $250 dollar battery.

On the semi's, battery heaters do help with cold starts, but leaving the truck plugged in makes more difference. So each vehicle will have three plugins. One block heater, One oil pan heater, One paired cord going to the battery blanket on each battery. It costs about $3 a night, per truck. We will typically have two trucks plugged in, a plow tractor, and one or two utility tractors.

I have seen it cold enough that we had to fill an oil pan with charcoal brickettes, lit them and slide them under the vehicles oil pan for a few hours to get the engine block warm enough to crank over. One needs to wrap blankets or tarps around the front of the vehicle to keep the heat contained whan doing this.

 

On the subject of diesel engines, we keep a couple quarts of anti-gel in every vehicle and a quart of 9-11. We start treating the fuel at around 10F sustained. Below zero, we start and idle the engines for at least ten minutes to get the block warmed up and lubricants flowing. The trucks are equipped with fuel tank interheaters so this gives the fuel a chance to warm up as well. Each truck has a spare filter and filter wrench so that waxed up filter can be replaced if the 9-11 additive doesn't hit it fast enough. 

When the trucks come back at the end of the day, they are parked on a level surface with the brakes off/ chocks placed. This is because the frozen road slop will run into the brakes which are still warm from friction, then freeze over night. The remedy is a sledge hammer if you're lucky or a propane weed burner and ten minutes per brake if you're not. If you leave the brakes open the slop will run on through.

Winter does not make me nostalgic. But does keep the riffraff to a minimum here.

On the personal side, each member of the family has a A3 bag with winter stuff- snow pants, heavy jacket, beannie, mittens, Yak Traks, goggles, silk scarf, etc. This is in addition to the coat and hat gloves they brought to the Yukon with them. There are a couple sleeping bags and several blankets in the car along with a snow shovel, tow straps, comealong, bags of trail mix etc. That stuff stays in the vehicle from Oct-April.

 

My dad showed me pictures of setting a straw fire on the tractor engine in the 1940's.  This warmed the engine so that the kerosene used as fuel would ignite reliably.  It was winter and the snow was pretty deep.  He remembered the temperature as being 10-15*F as early as November in Tennessee's Cumberland River Valley.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Malpaso posted:

MWL wins the thread drift award, and does so in stellar fashion

Longeye wins the "everyone else is in the tropics" award

Amen.  I thought life was bad when there was ice on my 'mog glass or the ute vinyl  cover cracked.

Im about 8-10 hrs north of Longeye.  I keep two shovels, a snow shovel, tow straps, blankets, extra gloves, mitts, toques, et al in the truck. Year round. 

Mounted the spare on the upper cargo rack on my taco. Crawling under a truck in the snow/mud sucks. Do not like. 

A set of oversize insulated coveralls is a great idea. Warm, and keeps snow/slop/road grime off you. 

Hi lift jack and numerous wood blocks. 

Only ever run full synthetic, only use -60 C rated windshield washer fluid. 

Always plug in the ol block heater. 

A toolbox in the bed, with numerous axes, hatchets, saws, tarps, etc etc inside. 

Full trauma kit, a booboo kit, and LBT go bag survival kit. 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-We are the sheepdogs, bad people looking out for the good people by killing worse people
-Don't get PTSD, Give PTSD. Make the taliban wake up screaming in the night because he fears Canadians are coming to Kill him.

-Location - Canada - Joined - 2006MAR19

One of those foam kids sleds are sweet to keep you off of the frozen ground changing a tire or having to be under a truck.

Reflectix "mylar  bubble wrap" insulation  you can find at Lowe's is even sweeter and it makes a kick assed ground mat for camping when you glue 3 or 4 layers together. I have also used it to put between the roof and the headliner on all of my vehicles because it works so well keeping the heat/cold away from my wife who will either freeze me or cool me to death depending on the season that I can remain reasonably comfortable. 2 layers with a 1.5 airgap is the same as an R21 fiberglass insulation  batt.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

I've been pretty cold in Southern Arizona.  Got snowed in once, too.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Well, winter finally hit Lake Erie. It's been blowing for the last 18 or so hours. The last 12 have had consistent winds at 25 mph or better with rain/sleet/snow. I should have ordered that truck cap a few weeks ago.

I'm thinking that the leaves won't need to be raked up anymore this season.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Sounds like the major bases have been covered here, hard to top a LF list.   One thing I always make sure to have on my person, in my stuff and in my vehicle in the winter is a reliable way to make fire.    In the winter, this usually involves a refillable butane lighter, a Bic or two, plus some stormproof matches and a couple of Esbit or Trioxane tablets.   I also have a camp stove (little MSR Pocket Rocket) and a titanium cookset and steel Nalgene.    I have used this in the past to defrost stuff in a pinch.   I also carry a bath towel cut in half in with the blankets and stuff, in case I get wet and need to dry off or dry something off.

Although this didn't make the last move,  in addition to the regular winter prep stuff and recovery gear for the vehicle, I had two sections of conveyor belt material about 18"x6' that I used to put down underneath the tires if needed.   Put them together, made a mat you could lay on, also.

EDIT:  Forgot to mention I keep a spare set of winter wiper blades in the car, too.

The thing to remember is that winter and cold... DO NOT CARE. Like a gunfight if you are prepared you keep what you have. If you are unprepared, nature takes her forfeit early. Pretty simple.

So all of the things I mentioned above are just my way of making life easier. Winter can be a lot of fun, but everything is done slower with a eye towards conservation of energy and not breaking a sweat.

Heat conservation is important as well. I have igloo camped when the ambient temp was -10F. But the inside of the igloo warmed up to very comfortable 25-30F just from stationary body heat. That means the artic bag is now redundant and just the bivy cover and the green patrol bag should get one through the night in relative comfort. Insulation is key- I used two ground pads.

 

concentric posted:

Sounds like the major bases have been covered here, hard to top a LF list.   One thing I always make sure to have on my person, in my stuff and in my vehicle in the winter is a reliable way to make fire.    In the winter, this usually involves a refillable butane lighter, a Bic or two, plus some stormproof matches and a couple of Esbit or Trioxane tablets.   I also have a camp stove (little MSR Pocket Rocket) and a titanium cookset and steel Nalgene.    I have used this in the past to defrost stuff in a pinch.  

Good call on the matches. I have been in cold enough temps that the butane fired lighters would not gas off. I have not had good luck with the storm proof matches. I still rely on the old stand by strike anywhere in a water tight case. I tend to care several candles and in the vehicles a handful of 15 and 30 minute road flares. While they don't burn real hot, they can be used to warm fuel enough to get it to burn.

I once used a case of aerial flares trying to light gasoline/diesel mix on a slash pile. Temp was about -5F. The gasoline/diesel mix would not vaporize enough to flash off. I finally had to do it the old fashioned way.

 

Longeye posted:
concentric posted:

Sounds like the major bases have been covered here, hard to top a LF list.   One thing I always make sure to have on my person, in my stuff and in my vehicle in the winter is a reliable way to make fire.    In the winter, this usually involves a refillable butane lighter, a Bic or two, plus some stormproof matches and a couple of Esbit or Trioxane tablets.   I also have a camp stove (little MSR Pocket Rocket) and a titanium cookset and steel Nalgene.    I have used this in the past to defrost stuff in a pinch.  

Good call on the matches. I have been in cold enough temps that the butane fired lighters would not gas off. I have not had good luck with the storm proof matches. I still rely on the old stand by strike anywhere in a water tight case. I tend to care several candles and in the vehicles a handful of 15 and 30 minute road flares. While they don't burn real hot, they can be used to warm fuel enough to get it to burn.

I once used a case of aerial flares trying to light gasoline/diesel mix on a slash pile. Temp was about -5F. The gasoline/diesel mix would not vaporize enough to flash off. I finally had to do it the old fashioned way.

 

So in those conditions, a Zippo style lighter ain't going to work either?

Longeye posted:

 

 I have not had good luck with the storm proof matches. I still rely on the old stand by strike anywhere in a water tight case. I tend to care several candles and in the vehicles

 

I've never had the lifeboat matches fail me. When the igniter on my jetboil wouldn't function on the side of a mountain in a gale, I was able to get the fuel to light with them. YMMV

Good call on the candles. Even a tea light will raise the temperature in a vehicle cab or tent by a few degrees. Sometime that's just enough to help you survive.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

FourNinerZero posted:

Im about 8-10 hrs north of Longeye.  I keep two shovels, a snow shovel, tow straps, blankets, extra gloves, mitts, toques, et al in the truck. Year round. 

Mounted the spare on the upper cargo rack on my taco. Crawling under a truck in the snow/mud sucks. Do not like. 

A set of oversize insulated coveralls is a great idea. Warm, and keeps snow/slop/road grime off you. 

Hi lift jack and numerous wood blocks. 

Only ever run full synthetic, only use -60 C rated windshield washer fluid. 

Always plug in the ol block heater. 

A toolbox in the bed, with numerous axes, hatchets, saws, tarps, etc etc inside. 

Full trauma kit, a booboo kit, and LBT go bag survival kit. 

Yeah, I miss Edmonton......friends and colleagues....not the f****g weather!

Joined sometime in 2008.                  Live in Canada.        

Was looking at those portable battery packs to jump your car, does anyone know how well those things hold a charge in cold temps? Saw Amazon had one of the Beatit brand ones as a flash deal I missed out on. I figure they would be good to have around, unless they dont hold the charge as well during the cold months.

--------------------------------------

Joined: 9/1/12

So, I'm getting ready to bite on a cap for my Frontier. Since I have an extended cab with a real shitty interior design, I need to place a lot of stuff outside under the cap.

How do you divvy up what goes outside in the bed under the cap, and what stays inside the limited space behind the front seats? I'm thinking clothes, sleeping bag/blankets, water and maybe food inside. Everything else in some kind of locking tough box outside in the cold.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

shadow93 posted:

Was looking at those portable battery packs to jump your car, does anyone know how well those things hold a charge in cold temps? Saw Amazon had one of the Beatit brand ones as a flash deal I missed out on. I figure they would be good to have around, unless they dont hold the charge as well during the cold months.

How cold is cold ?

I have 900 amp Booster Pack that I have used but it has been below freezing but above zero.  It has worked well for me and I have jumped autos, a tractor and a Ford 7.3L PSD. 

If the PSD is stone dead on both batteries it won't do the job. But as a boost to a low battery(ies) it does.

On a 3 cylinder wheel tractor with a completely dead battery and alternator I have gotten 4+/- hours of work time without it running out of juice.

Additionally, if I make a long trip or head out into the desert it is with me.

Not sure if that answers your question, but some info for your use.

k

 

Joined: 7/15/04 8:49 AM
Location: Northern Nevada

yakc130 posted:

How do you divvy up what goes outside in the bed under the cap, and what stays inside the limited space behind the front seats? I'm thinking clothes, sleeping bag/blankets, water and maybe food inside. Everything else in some kind of locking tough box outside in the cold.

Your on the right track. Think, what would you need that you wouldn't want to get out and rummage around in the cold and dark for, or if you can't get to the truck bed for some reason? When I had work box in my truck bed, I only put tools and redundant gear in it. 

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

I have one of the new Chevy Colorados with a double cab and short bed.

I got a Leer cap for it. It does not create a watertight environment. There are too many gaps in the bed and between the bed and the cap door edges.

I solved the wet, too hot in summer, too cold in winter problem by purchasing the biggest Igloo cooler box I could find, and securing it to the bulkhead. I didn't put a lock on it, but you could.

I now have secure, waterproof storage that maintains a constant temperature all year round, which is good for fluids, MREs, batteries and lighters.

Regards.

Mark

Formerly known as ML

MWL posted:

...I solved the wet, too hot in summer, too cold in winter problem by purchasing the biggest Igloo cooler box I could find, and securing it to the bulkhead. I didn't put a lock on it, but you could.

I now have secure, waterproof storage that maintains a constant temperature all year round, which is good for fluids, MREs, batteries and lighters...

We used to do that with our water in the winter, put in the cooler with no ice, just to keep it from freezing.

I enjoy the cold, when properly layered with good gear. Some of the guys I worked with looked at me a bit strange because they thought I was only wearing a light jacket. and wondered how I stayed warmer they did.

but once your nostrils freeze shut when you breathe, that is getting a bit extreme.

 

Kahana posted:
shadow93 posted:

Was looking at those portable battery packs to jump your car, does anyone know how well those things hold a charge in cold temps? Saw Amazon had one of the Beatit brand ones as a flash deal I missed out on. I figure they would be good to have around, unless they dont hold the charge as well during the cold months.

How cold is cold ?

I have 900 amp Booster Pack that I have used but it has been below freezing but above zero.  It has worked well for me and I have jumped autos, a tractor and a Ford 7.3L PSD. 

If the PSD is stone dead on both batteries it won't do the job. But as a boost to a low battery(ies) it does.

On a 3 cylinder wheel tractor with a completely dead battery and alternator I have gotten 4+/- hours of work time without it running out of juice.

Additionally, if I make a long trip or head out into the desert it is with me.

Not sure if that answers your question, but some info for your use.

k

 

I'm in Illinois, so negatives during the day are not uncommon even before wind chill very less at night. What brand do you have? Or what brands are worth looking at. If it could hold a charge for 2+ mo with temps that dip to -15 I would be happy enough. I need to look at a new pair of regular jumper cables as well as the current pair I have are some cheap short things. 

--------------------------------------

Joined: 9/1/12

shadow93 posted:

Was looking at those portable battery packs to jump your car, does anyone know how well those things hold a charge in cold temps? Saw Amazon had one of the Beatit brand ones as a flash deal I missed out on. I figure they would be good to have around, unless they dont hold the charge as well during the cold months.

Shadow:

A lot of that might have to do with the battery tech inside the pack.   They make ones with AGM tech, but there are LI-Ion and LIPO models as well.    

Storing batteries in the cold will actually help them keep a charge, but the output will be less than when warm, leading to more risk over an overdraw situation in which you pull the battery down and potentially cause damage.   To get max effectiveness from your jump pack, just make sure it's charged and bring it up to a reasonable temp. before you use it.    If it's one of those micro jobs, taping a few handwarmers to it could work.

I think Shadow is talking about how long a jumper/booster will hold the charge while just sitting in the truck waiting to be used.  That right?

 

If so, it depends on what type of battery it has, but my experience with the $80-$100 versions was horrible.  Bad enough that I ditched it.  I had been Taking it on hunting trips, but by day 3 it was dead.

 

This was probably 10+ years ago.  I'd like to hear reports on newer versions and what type of storage tech they use.  It'd be nice to have one that I could rely on.

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

Yes Pira is right. I'm talking about just leaving it in the vehicle how long it would hold. I keep hearing good and bad about them. They seem like a good small option to have in the vehicle, especially in the winter months. 

--------------------------------------

Joined: 9/1/12

Booster Pac  brand,  model ES2500.

I just checked it and it is sitting at 50% charge and been at least 2 months since I last charged it.

If I was looking at one, figure out the amps you think you will need and by a bigger one. For my truck I actually need a much bigger one as this will not start the truck when cold with two low or dead batteries. Look more at the cranking amps than the advertised peak amps.

I bought this one while on a trip and was having slow start issues in my Ford diesel PU. It was the biggest one they had. It did the job, but it is more the size for a passenger car.

As far as keeping it charged while on a trip it is fairly simple to adapt a cig lighter plug to keep it charged while driving.  Also, solar is an option.

k

Joined: 7/15/04 8:49 AM
Location: Northern Nevada

Bought a Ranch brand cap for my truck. Now I need some kind of boxes for storage inside it. Most likely locking boxes, probably the size of a footlocker, I guess.

Any suggestions?

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Rubbermade Tough Boxes/Action Packers are nice,fairly inexpensive but durable and lockable.

https://www.uline.com/Product/...HAQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

If you have a local military  surplus store check them out.  I pick up rocket boxes (metal shipping/storage boxes for rockets/missiles) for under a benjamin for all kinds of storage needs.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

yakc130 posted:

Bought a Ranch brand cap for my truck. Now I need some kind of boxes for storage inside it. Most likely locking boxes, probably the size of a footlocker, I guess.

Any suggestions?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Sta...ox-037025H/202300294

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Sta...ox-029025R/203710098

These are the shit. We use them for dive classes. Load them up in the shop, roll them out to the trucks. They hold ridiculous amounts of weight. Stanley makes a whole line of different sizes, the ones above were just what I found on the HD web site.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

On the vehicle front, we lived at 7,200' for a while , where the temperature would freefall into -30F to -40F as sunrise approached. My most expensive learning lesson was to change to a 5W motor oil in the winter. I left 15W40 in an old Chevy Blazer and trashed the engine. 

Engine block heaters are the bomb.

Even when I'm driving around / near town, I dress for walking for help. I keep a pair of Goretex lined boots and an insulated Carhartt jacket with a knit hat and insulated elkhide gloves in the back seat of my Jeep.  Survival gear was simple - keep a full set of camping gear in your vehicle, including 0°F sleeping bags. 

I've never been stranded in my vehicle but I have woken up to impassible streets, snow drifts filling the doorway and a general inability to go anywhere for 2-3 days except on foot. The mountain town I lived in had one road that led to civilization. The locals had stories of the road being closed for a week at a time and stores (including fuel) not being restocked. The highway closed kinda regularly for a part of a day and if it happened on a Monday, the shelves at the single grocery store got a little thin of perishable goods until the highway opened. We didn't go "full prepper" but we kept bread in the freezer and a modest amount of boxed milk in the pantry. 

Joined: 1/14/08                   Location: Central Wyoming

After reading and re-reading this thread, it all boils down to planning ahead,  stocking enough to get by for awhile (whether it be for mobile or stationary use), and using your head---calmly. 

 

Laugh all you want, but how many of us keep a couple of rolls of ass-wipe (survival paper) in our rigs? 

Bill, Idaho posted:

Laugh all you want, but how many of us keep a couple of rolls of ass-wipe (survival paper) in our rigs? 

Anyone who has been to a third world country keeps one in their go bag. This stuff - https://www.amazon.com/Charmin...Tissue/dp/B004I50XMS - is the shit.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

Bill, Idaho posted:

After reading and re-reading this thread, it all boils down to planning ahead,  stocking enough to get by for awhile (whether it be for mobile or stationary use), and using your head---calmly. 

 

Laugh all you want, but how many of us keep a couple of rolls of ass-wipe (survival paper) in our rigs? 

After reading this I'm glad I live in the sub-tropics.

Mind you, -20C would clear out some of the more nasty low life.

Malpaso posted:
Bill, Idaho posted:

Laugh all you want, but how many of us keep a couple of rolls of ass-wipe (survival paper) in our rigs? 

Anyone who has been to a third world country keeps one in their go bag. This stuff - https://www.amazon.com/Charmin...Tissue/dp/B004I50XMS - is the shit.

Bought up a lot of that type of package sold at stores in the Philippines.

I will check into the boxes. i knew they were out there. I just couldn't remember who made the quality ones.

 

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

M. Wilson posted:

I have a kid in diapers so I have to have baby wipes, love me the unscented Huggies.

All my trucks have two packs of baby wipes and two rolls of TP.  Always.

----------------------------

"Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword."


Friends, in your life I hope you do four things; lie, steal, cheat, and drink. When you lie,do it to save a friend. When you steal, steal someone's heart. When you cheat, cheat death. And when you drink, drink with me.

Joined 06/02/09.        Sierra Nevadas, Ca.

Make sure you keep the poop tickets  in a heavy "doodie" freezer bag. otherwise you may find it turned into expensive confetti  by said youngster when most needed.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

Bill, Idaho posted:

Laugh all you want, but how many of us keep a couple of rolls of ass-wipe (survival paper) in our rigs? 

Full roll, squeezed flat, and sealed in a  1 gallon freezer ziplock bag.  

Working out in the middle of no where, many times the nearest mesquite bush  was useful.   and if you could find a porta- shitter that was nearby it was likely raided for the paper from the guys who at one time had to use a there shirt tails as a substitute. 

 

Do yourselves a favour, and put your heavy duty zipplocked toilet roll into a second heavy duty ziplock bag with the opening 180 degrees from the first. Ziplock bags are not infallible.

There is nothing worse than discovering that you are the proud owner of a ziplocked bag containing a 1lb  papier mache model of a bogroll.

Regards.

Mark

Formerly known as ML

You beat me to that one.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Let me thank you for all the tips.  Keep'em coming. 

Sometimes winter storms are rain events.  We visited the Los Angeles Basin for the turkey fest and I-5 was horrifying.  I saw at least 30 accidents between the Bay Area and LA.  Lessons learned - SLOW DOWN!!

Toilet paper can also be stored in a coffee canister. I bought one at "Bed, Bath & Beyond".

We have managed to reduce our hotel load to one suitcase and a toiletry bag each for a week.  The wheelchair takes up a lot of room.  Add Class VIII, Line 3 and a cooler and he sedan is packed tight. The F150 has a lot more room even when used logpac.   

I try to keep the loads less than 50 pounds per box as I usually travel solo or as caretaker.  Duffel bags work well as they can be stuffed into a corner protect a box like an Action Packer size box.  And labels for everything. 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

So we have the sub-zero temps today finally. The area south of me, and on the east side in the snow belt area got nailed pretty good.  Right now, it's 15 outside, with a windchill of -7 or so. The news is harping big on the road conditions and snow removal. Also had a guy found on a porch this morning who froze to death somehow. He was laying on a couch on the porch of a house in da hood.

My day consisted of feeding the birds and animals out back, cleaning out the wood box, and filling it back up again. Now, trying to figure out what to get the wife for Christmas online, and  re-reading this. The new cap is on and is awesome! Got one of these to put stuff in:  https://www.lowes.com/pd/Blue-...led-Tool-Box/3355634.

Coleman's Surplus seems to have a decent selection of stuff. 6-pack of the orange marker panels, a variety of Swedish med bags, and an Esbit stove 4-pack ($10).

This is fun.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

The German Army has had extensive experience on the Russian steppes.   Their experiences are worth studying here.  Many of the lessons learned are familiar to the reader here.  40 pounds has consistently been the practical limit for carrying loads in the field.  Dress in layers.  Initiative carries the day.  Everything takes twice as long and sometimes you don't need to go there.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Going to be down to 20 below tomorrow night with the wind chill.   Temp sinking pretty fast right now.  At least Hartford will be quiet.  Crime doesn't like the cold.

-------------------------

IT'S A COLT.  THEY'RE LIKE THE HK OF GUNS.

HRH (Ret.) The Most Reverend Consig

Stupidity is not a skillset.

I AM GROOT.

 

 

 

 

 Joined: 28 Nov 2004: 0037hrs        Location: The worst run state in the U.S

Consigliere posted:

Going to be down to 20 below tomorrow night with the wind chill.   Temp sinking pretty fast right now.  At least Hartford will be quiet.  Crime doesn't like the cold.

With the Counselors post and quoting YAKC130

"So we have the sub-zero temps today finally. The area south of me, and on the east side in the snow belt area got nailed pretty good.  Right now, it's 15 outside, with a windchill of -7 or so. "

"So we have the sub-zero temps today finally. The area south of me, and on the east side in the snow belt area got nailed pretty good.  Right now, it's 15 outside, with a windchill of -7 or so. The news is harping big on the road conditions and snow removal. Also had a guy found on a porch this morning who froze to death somehow. He was laying on a couch on the porch of a house in da hood"

We are expecting "Sever Winter Conditions" here in Northern NV.

Sure seems like this "Global Warming" is pretty damn cold.

 

k

Joined: 7/15/04 8:49 AM
Location: Northern Nevada

Trajan Aurelius posted:

The German Army has had extensive experience on the Russian steppes.   Their experiences are worth studying here.  Many of the lessons learned are familiar to the reader here.  40 pounds has consistently been the practical limit for carrying loads in the field.  Dress in layers.  Initiative carries the day.  Everything takes twice as long and sometimes you do need to go there.

Tucked away for a 'best out of 5' match?

One of the local news channels just had a report about the local animal wardens and the Animal Protective League going out and confiscating animals left outside on leashes in these conditions.

I'd most likely rather be with these poor animals than their owners.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Dogs are part of the house/bed heat protocol here. Single digits outside, thermostat turned to 52 or so for the night, with the upstairs vents all closed, and I still sweat. At least one dog on the bed, and the other right next to it. Two humans. Queen bed, one blanket. Toasty warm at a minimum.

- - - -
Never be biased. Get to know people, and then hate them for objective reasons. They will almost always give you plenty.

www.routledge.com/9781138302969 (NOTE: Live Link)

Linz posted:
Trajan Aurelius posted:

The German Army has had extensive experience on the Russian steppes.   Their experiences are worth studying here.  Many of the lessons learned are familiar to the reader here.  40 pounds has consistently been the practical limit for carrying loads in the field.  Dress in layers.  Initiative carries the day.  Everything takes twice as long and sometimes you do need to go there.

Tucked away for a 'best out of 5' match?

I have seen the map for the Heer  plan to defend Germany in case of a Soviet inspired Warsaw Pact attack.  It was a map of Poland and Russia with a big red arrow going straight for Moscow and marked "12th Panzer Division" with a 72 hour timeline. 

 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

We are currently having a little winter weather here.

It is -39C (-38F) with the wind chill, with winds gusting to 60km/h (37mph).

We have about a foot or so of snow on the ground still from the last storm, and it is moving around in the wind pretty good.

Walking the dogs (we have two Samoyeds and a Samoyed/Great Pyrenees), at 06:15 this morning was quite bracing.

I'm at work now, hoping that everyone behaves themselves, and I don't have to go out and raise my eyebrows at anyone.

Regards.

Mark

Formerly known as ML

MWL posted:

We are currently having a little winter weather here.

It is -39C (-38F) with the wind chill, with winds gusting to 60km/h (37mph).


I'm at work now, hoping that everyone behaves themselves, and I don't have to go out and raise my eyebrows at anyone.

Regards.

Mark

Otherwise they will crack & fall off?

Well, the power is out right now. Has been for the past 2 1/2 hours, and the earliest estimate is another 2 1/2 hours before it is back on.

No generator at work, so it is rapidly getting cooler inside, and darker.

My eyebrows cracking and falling off is now the least of my concerns.

Regards.

Mark

Formerly known as ML

MWL posted:

Well, the power is out right now. Has been for the past 2 1/2 hours, and the earliest estimate is another 2 1/2 hours before it is back on.

No generator at work, so it is rapidly getting cooler inside, and darker.

My eyebrows cracking and falling off is now the least of my concerns.

Regards.

Mark

Did I mention there was going to be a test?  Let us know what your grade is.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

The power is now back on. It got cool enough towards the end, that I considered putting on a jacket.

I have my fully equipped 4x4 truck outside with a full set of cold weather clothing and survival pack in the back with snow shoes and poles.

At home I have an automatic standby generator with a weeks supply of fuel in two tanks.

At least this shift wil be over in a couple of hours.

Regards.

Mark

Formerly known as ML

Up to 20 now, and snow is supposed to start in a few hours, followed by sleet in the morning. Glad I'm working and not wasting a day off with shitty weather.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

This is what we got today.

If I can figure out how to load pics from my phone previously taken I have some rather interesting ones. 

Gonna get @ -8*f tonight with out the windchill...

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

Attachments

Photos (1)

I do not envy you. Even if it is the Christmas season.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Bad weather on the east coast. Tanker driver and another person killed during multi-car pile up on I-95. Video of a gasoline tanker trying to stop on an icy overpass and going over the edge and crashing and exploding below. Also video of  Cincinnati, OH pumper sliding into cars on an icy hill. All from Statter911.

Everyone be extra careful out there.

https://www.statter911.com/201...-crash-in-baltimore/

https://www.statter911.com/201...y-hill-hitting-cars/

https://www.statter911.com/201...y-roads-in-virginia/

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

We got around six inches of snow last night. Temps drop to zero and have stayed there all day. All the Colorado transplants make the driving more hazardous than the weather.  Tomorrow is gonna be in the thirties so there will be some melt. That's when it gets bad is the roads that then freeze. 

Because...........Malinois 

We're starting to get into the see-saw portion of the year, with long freeze periods followed by temperate thaws and melt, so it's either snow/ice/crunchy ground or mud until about April.   We started the woodstove in November this year, it will burn continuously with only clean-out periods until late April as well.   So all is well.    Plenty of food and water until spring, even if we got snowed in to then.    Once we get into this weather, everyone in the house (people and critters) all pile up and keep each other warm.  

Diesel plugged up to block heater on the cold days now, got everything all loaded up in the truck, gear, chains, etc.   Extra gloves and hats in both vehicles.    Stopped by the farmer's coop and got new shoes on Subaru, tried some Toyos on the recommendation of the staff there, we'll see how they go.   Goal this year is to stay out of the ditch, easier said than done on a 90 minute commute through the mountains on the twistys.

Couple questions:

If power isn't available for diesel block heaters in the winter, what do you guys do to start diesels in extreme temps?   A small generator would work, of course.    A propane heater under the truck would probably help, I know my buddy has used some sort of pan and a straw/gelled alcohol product they sell in Alaska for cold starts.   Cycling glow plugs a few times.   Any other tips?

I need some decent cables/chains for a 2005 Subaru Forester, any brands I should look at?

 

I've heard of making a small fire under a semi-truck's engine in a pinch, but there is a lot more clearance room. It heats the 10+ gallons of oil and the block. You'd have to watch pretty carefully. You could probably do some good with a small propane torch or the like, but I'd have to be pretty desperate because the only ways I can see that working involves a lot of miserable time in the cold. Not sure how long it would take to get enough heat into the block.

It was one thing I really liked about spending most of my OTR time in Mack trucks. Their engines, at least the old ones (not real old, mid 80s, but not like the current generation), would tolerate some nasty cold and still start when not plugged in. It is a lot easier on them if they are plugged in, of course.

I got the V8 Superliner to start at -5F once when it got a lot colder overnight than I expected. A lot of guys did not know that Mack did not allow winter fronts (radiator covers) to be used without violating the warranty. I compare that to an old Freightliner I drove with an old tech Reman 400 Cummins. Screaming fast, but a really narrow power band (1800-2200); if it fell to 1799 it was time to downshift in a hurry. That was one nasty bastard to start - most of the time if it was under 50F, it was ether and 30 minutes of feathering the throttle.

- - - -
Never be biased. Get to know people, and then hate them for objective reasons. They will almost always give you plenty.

www.routledge.com/9781138302969 (NOTE: Live Link)

WD-40 is better than ether for cold starts. You can use the IR propane heaters with a hose from the propane tank to the heater under the truck. Tarp the front end and use a salamander forced air heater to blow hot air under the truck if you forgot to put additive in and gelled up.

You can get the WEBASTO coolant heaters that can run off of gasoline or diesel and they use maybe a gallon or two a night of fuel, but are perfect for off the grid use. They use the vehicle's fuel to run or you can plumb them to an auxiliary tank, but using your existing fuel tank also keeps the fuel warm. They are super nice as your heater is preheating the cab and engine. If you slide off of the road they also will run for over a week if your tank was even half full vs a day day and a half with only using the engine to provide heat.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/2...ps&ul_noapp=true

https://www.google.com/webhp?s...asto+coolant+heaters

Commercial trucks use them, I love them and I have my local truck breaker looking for a specific model to use in my '06 Superduty so my kids will quit complaining when they have to ride in the back... (it has a cap, seatbelts etc, I'm not a totally heartless monster)

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

This random thought crossed my mind ... where do y'all keep your bottled water stash, in the cabin or in the bed of the truck?  I was just thinking, "Get stuck. Get thirsty.  DAMN! The water is frozen!"

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Trajan Aurelius posted:

This random thought crossed my mind ... where do y'all keep your bottled water stash, in the cabin or in the bed of the truck?  I was just thinking, "Get stuck. Get thirsty.  DAMN! The water is frozen!"

In a cooler on the back floor inside the cab of the truck. It rarely freezes completely, and when it has, a couple minutes over the defroster thaws it sufficiently 

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

M. Wilson posted:

WD-40 is better than ether for cold starts.

[ Can you elaborate? ]

You can get the WEBASTO coolant heaters that can run off of gasoline or diesel ..

[ Are they tapped in to the existing fuel system?  Is the heat source ( fire ) inside the cabin or truck bed? The VW Thing had a similar system that sometimes backfired into the cabin. That made mornings 'interesting' and messed with mileage calculations?  Or do they heat the coolant in the engine compartment and circulate the water that way? ]

 

 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Take the air filter out and spray the wd40 into the intake as you crank it over and it fires up as the wd40 has more energy in it than ether does and doesn't hurt the engine like ether can  (ether can wash the oil off of the cylinder walls and score/scuff the bore).

The wabasto heaters can be mounted in the engine compartment or along a frame rail. They are tired into the heater line and pump the heated coolant through the system. They have another style that heats air (think of your home's furnace) in the cab and the combustion air and the cab air never meet. They also circulate the fuel to keep it from gelling but when I was in ND I ran some extra coolant lines around the fuel cell and put that Reflectix insulation to keep more heat in. Guys thought I was crazy shutting off my truck and couldn't believe that it would fire back up 12hrs later at -40 (and colder) without being plugged in or in a heated garage. I got my old set up fromy a semi truck wrecking yard for a bit under $500 for everything.

This winter I may finally get around to putting my HVAC system out of a ford conversion van back into the rear cap of my wife's Superduty so the kids don't freeze to death when we go on drives.

They have a rough life, I took a third row seat out of Tahoe and built a frame to mount the seats to (the belts are built into the seat) so they are a tail gunner. Each side has USB ports, iPad and a 12v port for a heated blanket and a mini fridge.

Location: in SE Idaho, the birthplace of television.  And Epstein didn't kill himself...

Well, the first winter storm of the 2017-18 is making it's way through the norther tier of the United States this week.  Are you ready?

 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Well, I just bought a 50lb bucket of ice melter from BJ's tonight. I never really took my bag out of the back of the cab during the summer. I've been waiting for the temps to drop so that I could go buy new snow tires for my truck.

No. I'm not ready. 

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Trajan Aurelius posted:

Well, the first winter storm of the 2017-18 is making it's way through the norther tier of the United States this week.  Are you ready?

 

The answer to this was pretty much a "NO" for me. Went to the long sleeves and a beenie at work already. First layer of the winter clothes in the squad car and actually was wearing it a couple days. I have to remember to throw a couple hand warmer packs into my duty bag when I go back to work this week. 

My POV was only about 50% ready. I had already thrown my bag of winter clothes into the back, made sure my shovel and jumper cables were back there still. I added a heavy blanket (I need to find some quality wool blankets cheap one of these days) and made sure I had extra batteries for the flashlights.

This week comes a final car wash, changing the windshield fluid to winter stuff, tire rotation and a needed alignment, new windshield wiper blades, and application of RainX. 

The winter months of last year I was in the police academy, so this will be my first winter on duty. Fun Fun.

--------------------------------------

Joined: 9/1/12

According the the local weather folks here, the lake effect from Lake Erie is going to be bad this year.

Lots of cold, and lots of wet this year. I miss the winters in Saudi, already.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Vehicle serviced and snow shovel, kitty litter for traction, chains, clothes and sleeping bag loaded. Stocked up on soup, electric blanket on the bed. Will charge the hand held scanners and close crawlspace vents this weekend. Touched up some spots where the paint had gotten bad on the house a month ago. Traded fans for space heaters in the house. Second winter storm expected to hit the Sierras Fri/Sat.

Dave

"Keep that cheap, wail'n slut quiet!" A.J. Maggott

And meanwhile, I have a big thunderstorm just offshore here on Lake Erie rolling through with awesome lighting and window-rattling thunder and a temp of 60 degrees while I drink my coffee before heading out to work this morning.

Temps will then proceed to plummet later today.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

And the weather MILF here just mentioned tornadic activity is possible for us (STL area) today.... sure feels like it outside...

------------------------------------- "A True Warrior knows neither Left or Right"  Looking for a doc who can fix my allergies.. Stupid People and IED's...

As this will be my first winter with a 4WD vehicle, I'm pretty sure that my area won't see much more than an occasional dusting or flurries.

In the years past I have always had a 2WD pickup and through driving with a little common sense and decent tires, I have been ok.

We did have one year that was a little more challenging and I added a ShurTrax bag to the bed of my truck. Added a decent amount of weight to the bed of the truck without taking up a lot of room OR shifting around on me.

In the previous winters I have kept a small toughbox in the bed with a cable come-a-long, tow chain x2, tow strap x2, Hi-Lift Farm jack, ratchet straps and bungies, heavy gloves, spare coveralls (the good carharts are in the backseat) muck boots, basic tools, midget D-Handle and Flat Shovels, propane plumbers torch (with a single burner screw on "coffee" burner) tire plug kit, and a 7 gal air tank. Fire Extinguisher. All of this is covered -inside the toughbox- by a folded/ rolled insanely heavy weight "waxed" canvas tarp that is about 12x20.  A few years back I did screw in a couple of battery powered LED lights on the underside of the lid (note-- change the damn batteries every year even if you don't think they need it.

The tarp is a lot better to lay on when working on the side of the road than the frozen - wet- slushy ground.

Inside the truck in 3 x3day packs- Insulated Carhart coveralls, good insulated work gloves x2, neck gaiter, Wiggys Lamelite poncho liners x2, heavy knit cap (some of you may call it a stocking cap) Heavy winter work coat (Duluth Trading) spare pants (flanel lined Carharts), spare socks,  spare thermals and flannel shirt. Jumper cables, JetBoil, various lights / flashlights, Stanley FuBar (drivers door pocket), SOG hawk (drivers side console pocket. Fire Extinguisher (laterally across the front BOTTOM of the drivers seat)

Under the back seat - case of water, box of granola bars, 2 boxes of breakfast bars.

Hanging from the back of the passenger seat headrest- CLS bag.

This is in addition to those things that normally manage to make it into my truck on a daily basis depending on my threat assessment / spidey sense.



Thoughts?

------------------------------------- "A True Warrior knows neither Left or Right"  Looking for a doc who can fix my allergies.. Stupid People and IED's...

yakc130 posted:

According the the local weather folks here, the lake effect from Lake Erie is going to be bad this year.

Lots of cold, and lots of wet this year. I miss the winters in Saudi, already.

Yeah but the Saudi forecast has been downgraded to "Partly clear skies with a 20% chance of ballistic missile or interceptor debris"

~Will

 




 

 

   Anybody can blow something up, but to disarm anothers bomb, this is when talent, skill, bravery & LUCK will all determine "Success or Failure".  

 

Location: UTAH              Joined: 2003

Perhaps this should get moved to the preparedness section, no? 

 

You'd never know winter is coming with it being about 70 degrees yesterday. I'm ready for a couple big ass dumps of snow.

 

 

 

 

 

Joined:      14 January 2010                Location:  MAINE

So today we had thunderstorms blow  through with all kinds of warnings. I haven't seen any news, but apparently there were spotter reports of at least three funnel clouds around here.

59 right now, and by morning it's supposed to be about 40-45.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Doesn't snow where I live. It does in one of the areas I work in, so I keep a kit in the work truck. Chains, shovel, black GI fleece jacket and pants, water in an igloo to keep it from freezing, a couple of MRE's. Tarp for laying down on when putting on chains. I also have a 2 meter/440 mobile in the truck for bad cell areas. The fleece suit works better for me than sleeping bag or blankets when trying to lay down on the pickup seat. I have been stuck once up the mountain overnight and frequently end up babysitting a generator for power outages. Also keep Carhart hooded jacket for over the fleece if needed. Also, several pairs of wool socks and a spare pair of boots.

Garg 'nuair dhùisgear

7 months of the year is snow up here, so winter vehicle prepardness is on everyones mind.  I keep a toolkit with 30" breaker bar and torque wrench to ease with tire changes.  I also have a full size winter spare cause my summer donut is just terrifying to drive on in winter.  WINTER snow/ice rated tires are a must, as all terrain just doesnt cut it.  I also keep ice chains on hand if i do a roadtrip, as some areas require them in winter.  Bucket of ice melt to help with traction as well to melt the ice under my vehicle jack to prevent it from slipping if i have to change a tire.  A couple of Wool/fleece blankets cause im a heat slut.  I always keep my washer fluid topped up with a spare in the back, because with ice melt on the roads it can get pretty slushy even in -15C.  Extra POL as well (Coolant/oil).  Block heater stays plugged in when at home or work to keep the battery from freezing. 

I also keep spare winter clothes (Integral Designs SilPoncho, Arcteryx puffy jacket, merino wool thermals, wool socks, toque, balaclava, gloves, and hiking boots with grips).  Regular survival items in a backpack (road flares, flare launcher, CB radio, handheld radio, hand/foot warmers, cliff bars, bottles of water, pocket rocket and fuel, canteen cup, SOL Escape Bivy, emergency candles, marker panel, flashlight, headlamp).   I use the back of my SUV for car camping, so theres already a 2" foam mattress in the back.

I live 40KM outside of the city in a small town, so recovery if i go off the road or hit a deer or moose can take hours, especially in winter.  I also have a couple of cellular dead spots that get amplified during storms so i require the alternate means of comms.   I have a fairly detailed mass cas trauma kit in the car, as well as a booboo kit, as the highway I drive on gets rather sketchy with idiot drivers, and theres always a couple of fatalities a year.

IMHO the best prepardness for winter, especially driving, is to keep your vehicle in good condition for the the weather.  Tires, oil type, block heater etc.  Always drive to the conditions, and allow lots of time for breaking.  Mostly just dont drive like an idiot.

RIP Sgt. George Miok, Sgt. Kirk Taylor, Cpl. Zach Mccormack, Pte. Garrett Chidley 30-Dec-2009 Cpl. Joshua Baker 12-Feb-2010 TF3-09 KPRT

Having lived in Canada for the last 10 years, I have come to the conclusion that the best preparation for winter, is to move to Arizona.

The first couple of winters here was fun, but shovelling up to 10 feet of snow every year has become tedious. Throw in the odd ice storm, and winter can go f@ck itself.

Regards.

Mark

Formerly known as ML

Got four new Cooper snow tires last Thursday, and had to go in today and have them checked. Turns out that two of them are out of round. The shop tried to re-balance them, and moved them from front to rear. They said  to give that a try, and if it doesn't work, come back and they will see what they can do, including replacing them outright.

Cleaned out the back of the truck and threw in the 360 lbs of tube sand, and ran the portable generator for my BIL to make sure that it still works.

I guess that I should be ready for the snow that they are predicting later this week.

Fuck winter, cold, and snow.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

I'm still trying to get everything situated in the new truck for winter. Debating on if I need to buy sand tubes or not. Really want to get a tri-fold tonneau cover put on and figure out some underseat storage for my SuperCrew seat but I don't think I'm going to have that before we start getting snow. Its already started getting stupid cold and windy here. And to think it was 60 here last weekend. 

--------------------------------------

Joined: 9/1/12

I've been thinking about getting a short-handled broom to sweep my truck off with in addition to the small ice scraper brushes I have.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Packed up my old RAID pack with my Jetboil stove and a fresh canister of fuel, boo boo kit and some food, and threw it in my Subaru as a get home bag. I have a 30 mile commute to work each way. I also have my old black MSS sleeping bag with the bivy cover, an old black issued fleece jacket, hat, gloves, and Salomon hiking boots, in there. I'm still trying to figure out water. I usually carry a 40 oz Kleen Kanteen to work everyday, but I go through that fast, and I don't trust the water where I work to refill it there. I may have to do a test to see of frozen water will rupture the Kleen Kanteen if I leave one in the car.

"Never underestimate the predictibility of stupidity" RIP SSG Brad King. KIA April 2, 2007.

Only 30 miles round trip for work here. Always have my # DAP loaded with some necessities but there is nothing really remote enough on the drive that I couldn't seek help if absolutely needed.  The longest stretch without houses or some business is about a mile.  Between my pack and what's in my truck, I'm GTG for my daily routine.  Different story were I to venture West into the Sierras.

Mojo/Mark
__________________________
Yo homey, is that my briefcase...?
Vincent from "Collateral"
__________________________
You want the good life, you break your back, you snap your fingers, you snap your neck... Prong/Demon Hunter
__________________________

Because...I Can. 


Joined: 9/30/09
Location: Northern Nevada (Reno/Sparks)

 Normal way to work is 7 Km, with one ramped bridge which might get tricky from frozen rain or compressed snow.

Last Sunday I had the first snow slush on the windshield overnight, so Winter is coming...

Preparations:

Snow tires put on car     ->OK

 Coolant checked for content of Antifreeze   ->OK 

Wiper fluid tank filled with antifreeze mixture +extra bottle antifreeze concentrate   ->OK 

Car washed and waxed   ->OK 

Door and window seals treated with sillikone (and vaseline at spots where you don´t get it likely on chlothing) also antifreeze oil in lock openings and keyholes.     ->OK 

Driving down the tanklevel near reserve to fill up with ARAL Ultimate (aprox. 10¢ more per liter) Diesel (CFPP test to -39 Grad Celsius)        ->in process

 put in fresh  bic ligthers and matches in firekits and car compartments     ->OK 

put more max. tea light candeles, fatwood and other firestarter  in car         ->OK     

put more icesraper, snowbrooms and a snowshovel in car.       ->OK 

double plastic bag rolls of kitchen paper to stay dry     ->OK 

Put window de icer fluid in car       ->OK  

Woolblanket, one more tarp and some pair of winter workgloves in car.   ->OK 

small cooler with ¾ filled sturdy plasic waterbottels stored horizontally (freezing water so can expand best) and assorted bars candy and schokolade.       ->OK 

one multiplex wood plate 40x40 cm (to knee at while working on Car, as snowplate for carjack or to sit on snow  or as fire platform)       ->OK

small bags of birdcage sand and salt       ->OK 

Packing duffel (for overland travel in Winter)    with:

 Spare warm chlothing, one big old aluminium pot aprox 1 gallon? for melting snow. (Also handy for moving snow if here are more persons than shovels.)  Sleepingbag, foam mattress and tent    -> packed.

Cookset      -> packed

Swedish bowsaw 30# + axe  ->need new blade and axe not proper sharpened   -> to do

I took all my old clothes out of my kits and replaced with new. While it costs, I decided that if I have to rely on clothes that I'm going to toss, they won't work for survival. Why use something I won't wear daily?

Know thy enemies, but be aware of thy friends...

 

The average age of the world's great civilizations has been 200 years. These nations have progressed through this sequence:
from bondage to spiritual faith;
from spiritual faith to great courage;
from courage to liberty;
from liberty to abundance;
from abundance to selfishness;
from selfishness to complacency;
from complacency to apathy;
from apathy to dependency;
from dependency back again to bondage."

In the winter I carry a medium-sized cooler with some bottled water in it. I open it whilst (I love using that word)  I am driving, and close it over night. They have never froze overnight even when it gets down to -20.  If I am not going to be driving for more than a day, I take the cooler inside with me.  The cooler keeps the cold out just as well as it keeps the cold in.  

Unrelated to driving:  In two rooms of my house that don't get used, last summer I got some 2x4"s and made a frame about 1/2" smaller than the windows in those two rooms. I put some 1/8" siding with insulation between the two sides-essentially building the same wall the windows are in.  I then put that foam-tape stuff around the edge and placed them up against the actual windows on the ledge. (If that makes sense). I left the drapes up so you can't see what's behind it, and I noticed from the outside it just looks dark-like the lights aren't on in that room.   I have noticed my heating bill is not near as high. And, I admit boys and girls, this would therefore show my windows need replaced, but at this point- I don't need imitations of my wife bitching at me.  My house is only 30 years old, the windows are double-wall, and pass the no-draft test with a candle.  I just figured insulation about 4" thick HAS to do better than a window-no matter how fancy/new it is.

 Back to vehicles.   I covered half of the grill on my Dodge 2500 (Cummins).  I tried different levels/amounts  of covering the opening in the grill, and it seems covering half is the optimum amount to help speed up the time it takes to get the engine up to normal temp, and not risk overheating due to covering TOO much. Just an observation.  

yakc130 posted:

I've been thinking about getting a short-handled broom to sweep my truck off with in addition to the small ice scraper brushes I have.

Whisk brooms cost ~$3 and are widely available.  You may want to consider a small broom depending on how much snow you get and what kind of vehicle you drive.  A pickup drive is kind of hard to sweep clean with a whisk.   Check the local auto parts store in your area for a combination ice scraper and window whisk.  

I also add a pint of isopropyl alcohol and a tablespoon of Dawn Dish Washing Detergent to my windshield washer reservoir to keep it from freezing.  It also strips the road crud off the window and slings ice off the window.

shadow93 posted:

I'm still trying to get everything situated in the new truck for winter.

...

figure out some underseat storage for my SuperCrew seat

...

Du-Ha and Husky both make under the seat storage boxes for an F-series.

Available here https://www.realtruck <DOT> com/consoles-and-organizers/?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=consolesorganizers

DU-HA Under Seat Storage

 

 

 

 

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Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Trajan Aurelius posted:

Du-Ha and Husky both make under the seat storage boxes for an F-series.

Tough to utilize when it's full of long guns 

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

Trajan, I'm somewhere in-between the Du-Ha, building my own, and a Tuffy Lock Box. The Du-Ha is the easiest, building would be cheapest, but the Tuffy...Its just badass. 

I also added a roll up blanket and a packable down blanket into the back of the truck along with a full change of clothes, which includes a extra hoodie/jeans/undies/socks/tshirt, and an extra jacket. My drive to work is 6 miles each way through town so I'm not worried about anything too serious. It does however offer a compliment in the super rare occasion this part of the state would get enough snow I'd have to stay at the PD for the night or if I go home and something happens that gets me wet, or just to build layers.

Trajan, I've heard of you using that windshield washer solution before and its definitely something I need to try. However, I'm sure the dealership filled up the reservoir with summer stuff before I bought it.

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Joined: 9/1/12

Vinegar makes a great window cleaner for all of the crud kicked up from the road.

I may just buy a  regular corn broom and cut the handle down.

On a tangent, while tearing apart the bathroom in the house we bought, I found  that thee is NO insulation along the outside wall of the bathroom.

No wonder they are so cold in the winter.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

Re: small pickup truck in-cab storage, I recently skinned that cat and came up with one of these (at a slightly better price than linked) for the rear floorboard. Sits behind the driver's seat and center console, provides a nice platform for setting bullshit on top of (my briefcase/everyday bag goes back there on the way to work), and contains pretty much everything that has been mentioned in this thread. I can even reach into it from the driver's seat if need be, like an enormously oversized console. Only downside is that it does require the rear seat to be folded -- but the box is waterproof, so I can just throw it in the bed for the 1 time in 10,000 that I'm transporting more than 2 passengers and know that no matter the weather it'll all be fine. Any similar waterproof/water resistant box (depending on your level of givadamn) would do nicely. Or a medium-sized cooler (though many of them are of dubious rainproofness).

For those who aren't going to click through an ebay link, I use a pelican spacecase about 15" wide by 30" long. Relevant traits are waterproofness and ability to fit behind the seat of a Nissan Frontier (extended cab).

Malpaso posted:
Trajan Aurelius posted:

Du-Ha and Husky both make under the seat storage boxes for an F-series.

Tough to utilize when it's full of long guns 

I trust you are speaking from experience.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Trajan Aurelius posted:
Malpaso posted:
Trajan Aurelius posted:

Du-Ha and Husky both make under the seat storage boxes for an F-series.

Tough to utilize when it's full of long guns 

I trust you are speaking from experience.

@Shadow93:

"Trajan, I've heard of you using that windshield washer solution before and its definitely something I need to try. However, I'm sure the dealership filled up the reservoir with summer stuff before I bought it."

That summer stuff freezes at about 28-32*F.  I'm fair sure it gets a bit nippy in your neighborhood.

 

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Ground Pounder posted:

 I may have to do a test to see of frozen water will rupture the Kleen Kanteen if I leave one in the car.

I'm pretty sure that Kleen Kanteen explicitly warns against freezing their containers.  I think I saw that while reading up on washing/disinfecting instructions.

Pat_E posted:
Ground Pounder posted:

 I may have to do a test to see of frozen water will rupture the Kleen Kanteen if I leave one in the car.

I'm pretty sure that Kleen Kanteen explicitly warns against freezing their containers.  I think I saw that while reading up on washing/disinfecting instructions.

From their FAQ page -

Freezing your Klean Kanteen voids Klean's Strong as Steel™ guarantee because the expansion of the water can put so much force on the steel that it causes it to bulge or even split at the weld. Sometimes nothing at all happens. It depends on whether the cap was on and how much liquid was in the Kanteen.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

Thanks for the info on the Kleen Kanteens. I was warming my car up this morning and realized I left my bottle in overnight in 20 degree temps. Luckily I only had about 1/4 full of water, so no damage. I'll have to figure out another solution. I guess I could just fill up my bottle at work at the end of the day, but the fact we had the water in our building tested multiple times this year doesn't give me a warm and fuzzy.

"Never underestimate the predictibility of stupidity" RIP SSG Brad King. KIA April 2, 2007.

I just keep bottled water from the store in the truck.  The dimples in the bottom of the plastic bottles are there for them to expand when frozen, to prevent rupture.  I keep them in a plastic tub, just in case though.  I fill up my nalgene or steel bottles from these as needed.  I always have some kind of pot or canteen cup to heat water.

------------------------------------
Assaulting enemy camps from 400 yards away since 1972.

"There is no nice way to arrest a potentially dangerous, combative suspect. The police are our bodyguards; our hired fists, batons and guns. We pay them to do the dirty work of protecting us. The work we're too afraid, too unskilled, or too civilized to do ourselves. We expect them to keep the bad guys out of our businesses, out of our cars, out of our houses, and out of our faces. We just don't want to see how its done."
-Charles H. Webb, Ph.D.

Joined Lightfighter 1.0: early 2001, Lightfighter 2.0 11/19/02

Location:  Fucking Connecticut.  Goddammit.

Kleen  Kanteens also make insulated water bottles, which is what I use up here in Canada. They keep water from freezing in your truck at -30C.

Stings like a bitch when you sip from it at that temp, but hey, at least it’s still flowing!

"Well, thank God we all made it out in time... 'course now we're equally screwed."

This is what I have - http://www.rubbermaid.com/en-U...slim-cooler%E2%84%A2

It fits perfect behind the driver's seat of my F150, under my trauma pack, without having to raise the rear seat. I can actually unlatch, open and retrieve a water while driving.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

Thanks for the link to the cooler Malpaso. That looks like a good solution to fit behind the drivers seat in my Subaru. My space gets tight with the kid and my GSD in the back, along with all my other gear I'm hauling.

"Never underestimate the predictibility of stupidity" RIP SSG Brad King. KIA April 2, 2007.

When you prep your vehicle, think about rescuing someone else in addition to being stranded your self.

Case in point. Couple hours ago, the g/f's cousin calls, she has run out of gas (who does that?) on the interstate about a half hour from us. No problem, I've got multiple cans of gas in the garage. We get there, and it's pitch fucking dark with cars whizzing by at 70. While I position the truck with the headlights on the filler port, I realize what I don't have it my reflective coat, which I took out and replaced with my ECWCS suit (black). Dumbass.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

Malpaso posted:

This is what I have - http://www.rubbermaid.com/en-U...slim-cooler%E2%84%A2

It fits perfect behind the driver's seat of my F150, under my trauma pack, without having to raise the rear seat. I can actually unlatch, open and retrieve a water while driving.

“...water...” yeah....right....

Know thy enemies, but be aware of thy friends...

 

The average age of the world's great civilizations has been 200 years. These nations have progressed through this sequence:
from bondage to spiritual faith;
from spiritual faith to great courage;
from courage to liberty;
from liberty to abundance;
from abundance to selfishness;
from selfishness to complacency;
from complacency to apathy;
from apathy to dependency;
from dependency back again to bondage."

How much weight do people add to the bed of their truck in winter? Was going to buy about 200lbs of tube sand but I don't have anywhere to put it come summer right now either. Is 200 enough or should I go up to about 400?

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Joined: 9/1/12

I have six tubes, so that's what, 360 lbs?

I just stand it on end in the garage during the summer.

_____________________________________________

 

Doug

If I mention Corona, I ain't talking about beer.

 

"It's your turn to do until it's not."  TA

 

"Afterall.... if you get yourself into a fair fight.. you really haven't learned anything in all the time you have spent on Lightfighter, your tactics suck, and you don't deserve to breed."  David Reeves

 

JOINED:  9/20/09     LOCATION:  Outside of KSA Finally!

How big is your pickup?  I have a long box 2WD Dodge 2500 3/4 ton (2003) with a Cummins. Did I mention 2WD!   If there was one flake of snow within two counties, I was pretty well screwed.  I put four 20mm ammo cans full of 9mm brass (each of which max's out my artificial shoulder's allowable weight limits by a far piece...) in the bed and it damn-near turned it into a 4WD!  And I should say all I have is plain ol-fashioned  street tread tires.  In last years Treasure Valley's snowmageddanm , I had to chain up only once or twice.  Without the added weight....I would have been dead in the water.

  I would guess each can weighs somewhere are 200 pounds.   So, in my rig, about 800 pounds does the trick.  However, if you have a smaller pickup, more than likely 400 would work.  I was also told if you do put weight in the bed, it needs to go towards the front of the bed.  I left mine right near the tailgate for two reasons:  1.) that's as far as I could push them, and 2.) I figure the Cummins puts plenty of weight on the front end by itself!

NO MATTER HOW MUCH BALLAST YOU ADD, OPERATOR HEADSPACE NEEDS CONSTANT MONITORING.

 

yakc130 posted:

I have six tubes, so that's what, 360 lbs?

I just stand it on end in the garage during the summer.

I've got a 1/2t Sierra and I'm rocking 6 tubes also.  We haven't had much snow this year in the Minneapolis area (yet) but I haven't had to put it in 4x4 yet.  A new set of Goodyear Duratracs also helps though.

"These are the rules. Everybody fights, nobody quits. If you don't do your job I'll kill you myself."

 

Joined: 04/01/2004     Location:  Twin Cities, MN

I have an F150 4x4. I've never had to add weight, although I do not shovel the snow out of it, generally letting it melt to coincide with elapsed time from the storm.

---------------------------------

 

The .45-70 is the only government I trust

 

 

Joined: 1/30/06 3:34 PM - Location:MA

For those east of the Mississippi, how are your winter readiness preparations working out?

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

Malpaso posted:

I have an F150 4x4. I've never had to add weight, although I do not shovel the snow out of it, generally letting it melt to coincide with elapsed time from the storm.

I put a camper shell on mine.  That lively back end that danced around under power settled right down and helps in all road and off road conditions.

And I have spent the night there a couple times.

 

 

 

 

....

Sincerely,

 

Trajan Aurelius

 

 

When violence is the local language, be fluent.

 

"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins.  For unreasonable patience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but even the good to do wrong."  Saint Thomas Aquinas, "Summa Theologiae/Second Part of the Second Part/Question 158", c. 1274

I wrecked my collapsible shovel this summer while I was out gold panning. I'm glad I never had to dig myself out with it. I replaced it with a Cold Steel shovel. This thing is bomb-proof... and you can easily sharpen the edge. It's riding in a plastic bucket full of goodies in the back of my Jeep Cherokee.

Joined: 1/14/08                   Location: Central Wyoming

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